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There are no property rights on celestial bodies ... at present The Outer Space Treaty “explicitly forbids any government to claim a celestial resource such as the Moon or a planet.” And, since only governments can make such claims under international law, no one can. However, the treaty was drafted at a time when only governments could play in space and ...


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Probably First of all, a warranty is different from a guarantee under Australian Consumer Law (ACL). The license purports to exclude the former but not the latter. So, on a literal reading, the license doesn't offend the ACL and is probably fine on that basis alone although this may not be what the licensor intended. Notwithstanding, even if "warranty" and ...


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Basically it depends on whether there is a contract and whether the licensor is a business (vs private individual). For Australian consumer law to apply, the "material" must be supplied "in trade or commerce". That is, if you are supplied with the "material" outside of a trade or commerce (simply put, outside of a contract, but see DaleM's comment), ...


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Greendrake has some great points about what businesses are considered to be operating in the EU. It should of course be noted that the US is not part of the EU and is thus not part of the EU's jurisdiction. Which brings us to the question of how is the GDPR enforced in this case: This answer in Politics suggests that there isn't really a way to enforce ...


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