29

Law does not have an all-encompassing syntax and structure that, if not followed, makes it null and void. If a reasonable person could determine that (in the example of the sign you have) you are required to get written permission from any or all of the Paulding County Commissioners, then the sign is enforceable. I honestly don't see anything wrong with the ...


24

Employment discrimination based on the initial or native language of a prospective employee is probably not lawful under US federal law. Requiring the English-language skills actually needed for a particular job is lawful. Doing "editing, writing, or translation" obviously requires language fluency. But unless a business can demonstrate that it is ...


20

It's only a problem if it's ambiguous or unclear. Courts contend with grammatical mistakes and typos when interpreting text all the time, and have ways of determining what they mean—in fact, determining what text means is a large portion of what courts do. Even typographical errors (often called "scrivener's errors") that change a contract's ...


16

company does not warrant that use of the Software will operate uninterrupted or error free. A court will not find that statement to be ambiguous or contradictory. Mere grammatical differences will not void a contract. See Typing errors in legal contract I have recently encountered the following perl of perspicuous and immaculate syntax: Correct ...


14

Because of its French roots, Louisiana uses civil law.


13

Since use cannot operate in any sense, shall the whole sentence be annuled and the license treated as if without it? No. The statement is intelligible enough for a reasonable person would grasp the substance thereof; namely, that the company cannot be held liable for software interruptions or bugs. Therefore, the sentence is not to be voided or stricken. ...


13

This is a potentially litigatable matter under US employment law, where the outcome would hinge on what a "native speaker" is. One interpretation – a legally discriminatory one – of "Native speaker of Somali" is "a person born and raised in Somalia, who acquired Somali as their first language". This requires a specific national ...


11

The First Amendment is absolutely relevant to the question (in a public school which is subject to the First Amendment, because it is a governmental entity), although it isn't the end of the story. Generally speaking, a school can establish reasonable rules and regulations for its students and punish those violations with punishments such as detentions, ...


11

Details depend on the juristiction. For that, consult a lawyer if you plan to publish your app anywhere. But generally, even simple texts from exercises can be covered by copyright. Compare song lyrics, which are not much longer (and might not involve more creative thought than a good exercise ...). For vocabulary lists, it gets more tricky, but those can be ...


9

I would have liked to comment on this, but not enough reputation... I assure you that those statements are vetted by highly paid lawyers I think it's a clash of culture. The OP's view on these signs seems grounded in pure logic (possibly computer science?) I assure you that from a purely logical perspective, both statements are indeed nonesense. "...


8

The relevant question is whether the material has a smidgen of intellectual creativity. That is the case with language-teaching dialogues, because they require careful selection to be successful. The typical conventional exchange "Subax wanaagsan. Ma nabad baa?" may be unprotected as an automatic greeting, but after that, significant creativity ...


7

“I’m going to kill you” is not a threat Or at least, not necessarily. A criminal threat is more than words - it must encompass the intent to carry out the threat. Except in wholly exceptional circumstances, this type of language between parent and child is not a threat.


7

They are setting that requirement in q very broken and illegal way - but their core goal is a legal one. Think about it: if you require employees to speak Navajo because you need that, that is lawful, even though it will have a strong tendency to select for certain Native American tribes (i.e. Navajo). An employer can require English language because it's ...


6

Malta has two official languages, one of which is English (the other is of course Maltese), and its legal system is based on a mixture of common law and civil law. I don’t know in which language its legal decisions are published, though.


5

The term doesn’t come up Because, AFAIK, there are no circumstances where being ignorant of the law allow a person to escape culpability. There are, however, laws that allow ignorance of the facts to be an excuse. For example, a person who receives stolen goods where it is reasonable to believe that they aren’t is not guilty of the crime (although the ...


5

I've found a source from the Budapest Government Office in Hungarian. A nyelvtudást nem kell nyelvvizsgával igazolni, a magyar nyelven történő kommunikáció az elvárás; a kommunikációnak kétoldalúnak kell lennie, azaz mind a megértésnek, mind a kifejezőképességnek középszinten kell állnia. A magyar nyelvtudás vizsgálatánál nem probléma a nem magyar ...


5

There is no internationally-enforceable mechanism regarding how other people call something, or what alphabet can be uses to write a word. I can legally call that country between Bangladesh and Thailand "Burma" or "Myanmar", I can call Україна Ukraine, The Ukraine, or Ukrainia (the latter seems to be old-fashioned, but it's still legal). As a diplomatic ...


5

Generally yes - I need only English text e.g. for the French or Germany law. A list of (semi-offcial) German Federal Law translations can be found here: Gesetze im Internet - Translations Translations of these materials into languages other than German are intended solely as a convenience to the non-German-reading public. Any discrepancies or differences ...


5

Similar to Louisiana, the Province of Quebec in Canada uses Civil Law, also due to its French roots.


4

Here is a list of language-regulating bodies. There is none for English, but they exist for Spanish (Real Academia Española), French (Académie française) and Swahil (Baraza la Kiswahili la Taifa for Tanzania, Chama cha Kiswahili cha Taifa for Kenya). No language regulator addresses the issues which arise in the interaction between natural language and the ...


4

Hospitals in the US that receive federal funding (e.g., Medicare, Medicade, FCHIP, etc.) are required to provide language services under Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 52 U.S.C. §2000d et seq to those persons of limited English proficiency who receive services. This US Government Department of Health & Human Services page notes: Persons with ...


4

The legal implications are negligible. A ceremonial declaration that English is official has no practical effect; other legislation is required to have an effect. Congress could pass a law declaring that English is the official language of the US, but they would also have to pass additional legislation for that to have any effect. For example, to prevent a ...


3

Because animal has several definitions, specifically: 2 b : Mammal While you are probably thinking of: 1 : any of a kingdom (Animalia) of living things including many-celled organisms and often many of the single-celled ones (such as protozoans) that typically differ from plants in having cells without cellulose walls, in lacking chlorophyll and the ...


3

In the US, Congress may pass an act, and this creates one kind of law (if it is promulgated: signed, ignored, or re-passed with a super-majority). Some of those acts direct the executive branch to do things, and pursuant to that act, a regulation is promulgated. Together with case law, the whole thing is "law". A bill (in the House, or the Senate) may result ...


3

Even though I am not a lawyer, I am pretty sure that any German employment court would decide to use a common sense interpretation of the contract and assume "EUR 45,000" means "Forty-five thousand Euro" not "Forty-five Euro". Euro is a currency with two decimal places, not three Mixing up English and German number formats is a common mistake The English ...


3

Can you ask the company to add the spelled out of the number to the text? If this will make you more comfortable. Also, I sometimes found an English text from European body that use the format of 12456 (no thousand mark at all) or 12 456 (use space).


3

There is no such thing, legally, as "an attack on someone's writing". The only way in which any use of one person's writing by another could be the subject of legal action would be if it infringed copyright. But individual words, short phrases, and individual numbers are not subject to copyright protection. In theory such things might be protected ...


3

Nothing specific and nation-wide prevents you from doing this, but you might be stopped in a specific way in a specific location. You may even be allowed or required to do so, for example RCW 26.21A.630 says (in the context of child support issues) "A record filed with a tribunal of this state under this article must be in the original language and, if ...


3

First of all, this is probably a poor idea even if it is legal. Verse, and song lyrics, are notoriously hard to translate well, and make poor examples for language learning, They tend to employ metaphor, allusive language, and idiom heavily, and will in many cases distort the sense of the language for the sake of rhyme, meter, or other auditory effects. But ...


3

It may depend on how strictly they interpret the term "native speaker". I would certainly have cause for complaint if they classified me as a non-native speaker of English, given that it has been my primary language since I was about 4. If they're using the term as a shorthand for a level of fluency in the language, rather than its literal meaning ...


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