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The sea area in question is a Marine Protected Area, which is referred to in the united-kingdom as a Marine Conservation Zone (as per No17 on the 2016 linked list) and lies within the UK's territorial waters. What UK law prohibits this? I have discounted my initial thoughts about s.58(2) of the Merchant Shipping Act 1995 as I strongly suspect the Greenpeace ...


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Yes More exactly, nations will not regard places outside of their physical limits as outside of their jurisdictions. Overview Traditionally, a nation has regarded any ship flying its flag as under its jurisdiction, and a place where it may enforce its laws. More recently, many nations will undertake to enforce laws in cases where their citizens are the ...


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The thing is: there is nothing to prevent a sovereign state from making laws whatever it wishes (subject to international agreements/treaties/conventions it signed, if any, and the extent it is prepared to flout those). A country could make a law that assumes jurisdiction over whatever wherever — be it international waters, Mars, Alpha Centauri or even just ...


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Can someone by prosecuted if they commit a crime outside of all jurisdictions? This is a tautological question. If they can be prosecuted, then they are by definition subject to the jurisdiction they are being prosecuted under, and if they are outside of all jurisdictions, then there is no jurisdiction they could be prosecuted under. Also, if they are ...


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As pointed out in a comment, exclusive zones cannot overlap by definition, given the meaning of "exclusive." Your question is answered in the Wikipedia article you link to: Generally, a state's exclusive economic zone is an area beyond and adjacent to the territorial sea, extending seaward to a distance of no more than 200 nmi (370 km) out from ...


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Whatever else it may be, it isn't piracy. Piracy is covered by the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea, Part VII, and Article 101 defines it: Piracy consists of any of the following acts: (a) any illegal acts of violence or detention, or any act of depredation, committed for private ends by the crew or the passengers of a private ship or a private aircraft,...


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To me, they are synonymous but england-and-wales legislation often uses "in accordance with" as well. By way of an example: a word search of that phrase in the Merchant Shipping and Maritime Security Act 1997 returns 91 hits, whereas "under an order" and "under regulations" have just three each, and "stipulated" does ...


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I cannot find the Italian Criminal Code from 1968 to see whether they had, or had not, extraterritorial jurisdiction for the alleged offence of avoiding national taxation, but I have found this more modern reference that suggests they might have it nowadays if the conditions are right: Italy does not have general extraterritorial jurisdiction, although ...


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Distance from land and bilateral contracts. In the North Sea the jurisdictions of Noway, Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands, Belgium, England, Scotland create almost a full circle around, leaving only a gap in the Iceland-bound area. There's a spec of Denmark that way, but that's typically not seen as in the North Sea. Where not otherwise possible, the EEZ ...


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There is no such thing as a jurisdiction free place on earth If you are on a boat, you are in the jurisdiction of the boat's registered country or the country. If it is not registered, the law of the owner's country applies. If you are off a boat, you are a citizen of your country and it has jurisdiction over you. No spot of permanently dry land known to ...


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