6

Here are the opinions I found which do not explicitly state that Regina is fictitious. University of Utah Hospital and Medical Center v. Bethke, 611 P.2d 1030, 101 Idaho 245 (Idaho, 1980) ...in my judgment, the majority seriously errs in using an esoteric, artificial and strained construction of the phrase "in Idaho" to hold that the legislature ...


3

Law doesn't have a monopoly on bad writing. Steven Pinker, in "Sense of Style" and other articles, says that the kind of poor writing you mention is a symptom of the "curse of knowledge". Justice Kagan believes that good legal writing needs to at least be good writing, and law schools aren't doing enough to teach that. All the other Justices expressed ...


3

Read the whole opinion. It's pretty clear the judge was having some fun with it. Judges do this from time to time. When someone involved in the case didn't consider seagulls, ducks, or geese to be birds, and the judge is writing a humorous opinion, he'll pick up on that, and a joke about horses with down pillows on their back counting as birds is a natural ...


3

The first student-edited law review was The Albany Law School Journal - of Albany Law School - which was published for only one year, in 1875. The first student-edited law review was the Albany Law School Journal, which lasted only one year, through 1875. This law review contained articles, Moot Court arguments, and a calendar of law school events. The ...


2

The customary length of a law review article is to a great extent a matter of tradition and historical issues like length limitations. There are many people who believe that law review articles are too long, and indeed, law review articles are quite rarely cited by courts or lawyers, although they are fairly often used to locate cases on points relevant to ...


2

At least in common law jurisdictions, where judicial precedent forms a large part of the way the law works, the authors of academic or review articles are often at pains to avoid appearing to prejudge any issue, while at the same time seeking to get their own interpretation of the ramifications of some quirk or novelty of the law across to a wider readership....


2

I think the underlying reason is the requirement (somewhat shared with philosophy) to be exhaustive, i.e. cover all perspectives on a question and all relevant facts. Short articles narrowly focused on hair-splitting minutia might cover all of the case law and legal literature within a few pages, but anything that takes on a massive topic like "what does '...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible