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81 votes

Why are there no laws rewarding people

There are plenty of laws that reward people These include: Literal rewards - payment for information leading to an arrest/conviction. Welfare systems - the government is literally paying money in ...
Dale M's user avatar
  • 213k
72 votes
Accepted

Who is supposed to teach the law to the citizens?

The answer from @user6726 is a good one. But, I'd like to add to it by pointing out that the body of law applicable to an individual is usually much, much smaller than the entire body of law. I'm a ...
ohwilleke's user avatar
  • 221k
65 votes
Accepted

Self incrimination during medical examination

If such conversations are reported, it can place the suspect in a dilemma. Consider a man who appears to have overdosed on illegal narcotics. He is taken to the hospital, and the doctor asks what ...
Nate Eldredge's user avatar
51 votes
Accepted

Is it a real legal principle that any ambiguity in a contract is interpreted to the benefit of the side that did not write the contract?

Contra proferentem However, it's a principle that is rarely applied in practice since it's at the end of a long line of judicial reasoning that gets applied first. Ambiguity in contract provisions are ...
Dale M's user avatar
  • 213k
42 votes

Why can't the current legal system handle liability for harm caused by artificial intelligence?

Real-world situations are rarely so clear-cut Let's say, hypothetically, that I'm in the driver's seat of a car. The company told me that the car has "Full Self Driving" capabilities based ...
Ryan M's user avatar
  • 10.3k
32 votes
Accepted

Everything which is not forbidden is allowed

It's generally correct in the American system that everything not forbidden is permitted. But the law you're looking at isn't really an exception. You have the legal right to tamper with evidence if ...
bdb484's user avatar
  • 60.7k
30 votes

Is there any merit in continuing to fight a trial despite an overwhelming chance of losing and there being no plea deal?

Yes. Juries aren't terribly accurate. There is an irreducible chance that no matter how clear the outcome should be that the jury will get it wrong. Based upon a review of the academic literature on ...
ohwilleke's user avatar
  • 221k
29 votes

Who is supposed to teach the law to the citizens?

This is a difficult question in the philosophy of law, which in some views of what "law" is, is outside the scope of law (that's the view that "the law is whatever is enacted by the ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 215k
26 votes

Neither guilty or not guilty

Your question assumes the omniscient-observer perspective, that there is someone who knows everything but doesn't interfere in human affairs. Thus the premise; the person committed the crime, nobody ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 215k
24 votes

Is natural law a type of common law?

No, Natural law is not a type or subset of Common Law Natural Law is derived from what some person thinks is a logical and obvious rule, or what some person thinks is God's Law. There are many ...
David Siegel's user avatar
24 votes

Why are there no laws rewarding people

In the UK, judges sitting on criminal cases can award cash sums to individuals for exceptionally public-spirited actions which have come to light during the trial. For many years the customary sum was ...
Michael Harvey's user avatar
22 votes

Faulty legal advice

Question 1: would the charges be lessened, if I say that my lawyer told me it was ok? Question 3: let's say the scenario was very different, involving something much more complicated, such as ...
ohwilleke's user avatar
  • 221k
20 votes

Why can't the current legal system handle liability for harm caused by artificial intelligence?

Error is not always Wrongdoing The OP writes of "wrongdoings of algorithms". To me a "wrongdoing" is something that would be criminal, or at least involve civil liability. But not ...
David Siegel's user avatar
17 votes

Everything which is not forbidden is allowed

@bdb484's answer is good and correct. I'm coming in with the advantage of its commentary to address the questions generated there; this is just too long for a comment. I own a kitchen knife. I can do ...
minnmass's user avatar
  • 311
15 votes

Why are there no laws rewarding people

Boy, the "yeah-but" gang just hates this question. I added a bit at the end about how to see for yourself. The rule of law exists to replace any of these: { violence, extortion, corruption ...
Harper - Reinstate Monica's user avatar
14 votes

Neither guilty or not guilty

It makes a different whether "charges are dropped" or whether there is an actual trial and the person has been acquitted. It also makes a difference under what jurisdiction this occurs. In ...
David Siegel's user avatar
12 votes
Accepted

Why do legal documents often have a place next to the date?

The validity of the execution of a contract is governed by the law of the place where it was signed. A location next to the date establishes that place and hence often, the governing law for the ...
ohwilleke's user avatar
  • 221k
12 votes
Accepted

Is there "evidence-based" practice in law?

The primary field of research where the kind of studies you are thinking about are done is often called "empirical legal research." There is a fairly rich literature, that a substantial ...
ohwilleke's user avatar
  • 221k
10 votes

Is there any merit in continuing to fight a trial despite an overwhelming chance of losing and there being no plea deal?

The defendant cannot be sure that the evidence will leave the trier of fact (judge or jury) with no reasonable doubt that the defendant committed the crime. Thus, the defendant can only "know&...
Jen's user avatar
  • 59.7k
9 votes

What if a citizen does not accept all laws?

I am not sure what you mean by "accept". A citizen need not agree that any particular law is desirable, or good policy, or even rational. What a citizen must do is comply with all laws, or ...
David Siegel's user avatar
9 votes

Is there any merit in continuing to fight a trial despite an overwhelming chance of losing and there being no plea deal?

In the English legal system you get a small bonus for pleading guilty early. Since that might equate (in a murder trial) to less than a few months of additional jail time after a potential sentence of ...
Richard's user avatar
  • 4,095
8 votes
Accepted

Legal remedies if a lower court ignores stare decisis?

The alternative is the same whether just one lower court or many lower courts ignore SCOTUS precedent. An aggrieved parts will appeal the lower court ruling, and the matter will work its way up the ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 215k
8 votes

Why can't the current legal system handle liability for harm caused by artificial intelligence?

Any system that might endanger people must be reasonably safe. In the UK the likelihood of an accident must be "As Low As Reasonably Possible" (ALARP). In the event of an accident it is for ...
Paul Johnson's user avatar
  • 13.6k
7 votes

Neither guilty or not guilty

The question "how is this explained legally" is worth answering. Its not the same as "how does guilty/not guilty work", or even the "not proven" verdict in Scottish law. ...
Stilez's user avatar
  • 3,189
7 votes

Neither guilty or not guilty

As someone that has served on a criminal jury at a criminal trial, I can say that the verdicts "guilty" and "not guilty" don't literally mean that. The jury isn't actually judging ...
Ray Butterworth's user avatar
7 votes

How can one utilize an "objective observer", if one cannot be such?

The objective observer is not a real person She is one of a number of imaginary people who are used in law to inform judges and jurors how they should intellectually engage with a legal issue. We may ...
Dale M's user avatar
  • 213k

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