16

This answer is limited to options in the United States. According to the U.S. News and World Report annual survey of over 197 law programs, the average cost of attending a private law school is $43,020 and attending a public law school costs an average of $26,264 for in-state residents and $39,612 for out-of-state students. At the top 10 law schools in the ...


12

If Tratatoria has anti-discrimination laws, or provisions in its constitution forbidding discrimination, the Minister's actions might be illegal under them. But if it does not, or if it does not enforce whatever laws it may have, there is no international authority that can enforce any rule against discrimination. People and groups in other countries could ...


9

To add to jimsung's detailed response, some U.S. state ethics panels have issued opinions regarding the usage of the title "doctor." Over the last couple decades, formal positions suggesting that JDs ought not to use the title (including the ABA's own position) have begun to erode as the various states have relaxed the strictures (albeit with cautionary ...


9

The answer isn't really legal (though some jurisdictions regulate the use of such titles through statute), but academic. It depends on specific countries. Italy, for instance, allows all graduates, including undergraduates, to use the title doctor. However, in general the title doctor is reserved for those in medical professions, upon graduation, or holders ...


8

The customary honorific in the United States used to identify someone who has a J.D. (doctor of laws a.k.a. "Juris Doctor"), which is a recent invention, or an L.L.B. (bachelor of laws), the more common historical name for the same degree, if that person is also admitted to the practice of law, is to state someone's name followed by the honorific "esquire". ...


8

Although your question hints at the USA, you didn't tag this with a jurisdiction so I will answer for England and Wales in case it is useful to you or anyone else. I'll also assume that the goal is to qualify as a lawyer (rather than specifically to attend "law school" for its own sake). The Solicitors Regulatory Authority has recently overhauled ...


7

In the U.S, at least for some time in our not too distant history, there were a substantial number of jurisdictions that allowed people to "read in" to a law degree, meaning exactly what @cpast said in his comment - that people who were so inclined and with the intellectual aptitude to understand old english common law and modern stare decisis (essentially, ...


7

In the US, the terminal degree in law equivalent to an academic doctorate (i.e. a Ph.D.) is not the J.D., or the L.L.M. It's the S.J.D. Here's Harvard's program. Here's UCLA's. Hardly anyone gets them anymore. Here's a Georgetown Law Weekly blurb. Lawyers may jokingly call each other "doctor." I do that sometimes when I run into someone from my law ...


7

If you simply want to acquire knowledge in law, reading is the most effective way. Even law courses (at least where I am from) consists of tons and tons of reading. Read, read, read. Usually the items are: Legislation (i.e. the actual law). If you are attending an Intellectual Property class, you will be assigned to read Copyright laws. In a Criminal Law ...


6

Here are the opinions I found which do not explicitly state that Regina is fictitious. University of Utah Hospital and Medical Center v. Bethke, 611 P.2d 1030, 101 Idaho 245 (Idaho, 1980) ...in my judgment, the majority seriously errs in using an esoteric, artificial and strained construction of the phrase "in Idaho" to hold that the legislature ...


5

I am wondering if anyone here could say if it is worth going into law, particularly when coming from a good law school (and assuming I have a real interest in the subject and enjoy research, etc.). Is it true that the profession is contracting, and that it could be hard to find a decent job? Is there decent upward mobility in the profession, or should one ...


4

Basically: what Flup said in his last paragraph (and so upvoted accordingly). Every one of the practitioners you named has an undergraduate degree from the UK, and an undergraduate degree from Canada. This, presumably, is because you're not permitted to practise law in most jurisdictions unless you have some kind of qualification in the law of that ...


4

"Understanding the law" and the availability of information on law and in particular the real estate laws of NYC are different things. There are many online resources for the law; Google "NYC Real Estate law" and look at Wikipedia, Findlaw, Justia, the Cornell and Stanford law sites, state and federal government sites that make codes available, etc. But ...


4

The first thing you need to know is that if you go to law school, you will hate your life for at least those three years. Law school is not like other graduate school programs. If you do reasonably well, it will almost certainly consume your life. Law school students (and lawyers) experience substantially higher rates of alcoholism, drug abuse and depression....


4

Legal Education Compared In the U.S., the customary way that one learns about the law for purposes of being admitted to practice as a lawyer is by completing three years of course (with no thesis or dissertation) at the graduate level, after completing a non-law related undergraduate degree (customarily four years but including non-legal studies), and then ...


4

There is no blanket international law against all forms of discrimination, so there is no way to make an official determination. It might be possible to do so in a specific case for a particular kind of discrimination, so you have to find what treaties Tratatoria has entered into. The International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial ...


3

A lot, but let's be practical. Or nothing, depending on how it is taught. I experienced the joy of obligatory 4th grade Spanish instruction, where there were virtually no Spanish-speaking teachers (they relied on a edu-tv show): it was not at all effective and didn't last a year. Teacher training on the subject matter is a big problem: so it should be ...


3

Is it possible to become a lawyer if you have a record? Yes. But, it is also possible to refuse to admit someone to the practice of law based upon a criminal record. The decision is made by a "character and fitness" committee of a state's bar admission system after someone has finished law school and passed the academic part of the bar exam. If one state ...


3

The (ancient) Romans had schools of rhetoric, which was largely informal when compared to the current legal education system. Consul Tiberius Coruncanius gave legal classes in the 3rd century, but they would have been small. Over one millennium later - more like 1500 years - universities in Europe began studies in law, mainly ancient. This wouldn't have ...


3

In common law countries there was, and in some areas still is, the practice of "Reading the law" which was similar to an apprenticeship. A prospective lawyer would work for an established one until they were ready to practice on their own. In the United States California, Maine, Vermont, Virginia, and Washington still have processes that permit this ...


3

In the states of California, Maine, Vermont, Virginia, and Washington, an applicant who has not attended law school may take the bar exam after reading law under a judge or practicing attorney for an extended period of time. In 2013, 60 people became lawyers this way out of 84,000 via law schools. from Wikipedia®


3

In England and Wales, there are three stages of legal training: academic vocational professional (not covered here) The academic stage is satisfied by a qualifying first degree in law (e.g. an LLB). At this point the student must decide whether to qualify as a solicitor or a barrister; the former must undertake the LPC, the latter must do the BPTC. This ...


3

The first student-edited law review was The Albany Law School Journal - of Albany Law School - which was published for only one year, in 1875. The first student-edited law review was the Albany Law School Journal, which lasted only one year, through 1875. This law review contained articles, Moot Court arguments, and a calendar of law school events. The ...


3

In some Eastern European countries lawyers are in fact called doctors. They use this title as physicians (medical doctors) do.


3

Read the whole opinion. It's pretty clear the judge was having some fun with it. Judges do this from time to time. When someone involved in the case didn't consider seagulls, ducks, or geese to be birds, and the judge is writing a humorous opinion, he'll pick up on that, and a joke about horses with down pillows on their back counting as birds is a natural ...


3

Wave Broadband is a private company; they can probably decide to not provide service to an address that is in arrears or collections. I'm sure there is a clause in their service contract that states they can do that, and there would be local or state laws to support that. Whatever public service commission governs the state may also allow that. It's ...


3

California, Virginia, Vermont, and Washington allow a person to substitute a pattern of study in a judges or lawyer's office. In California, this is per rule 4.29 of the California Bar, and rule 6 of the Washington Supreme Court. These states require the candidate to be supervised and tutored by a practicing attorney or judge, which makes it challenging to ...


3

The author of a text or essay may cite in whatever order s/he thinks best. It m,ay be that a basic text gives a better and clearer overview than any actual case, and so is worth citing first. It is true that actual case law is often more authoritative than a statute, and cases and statutes are normally more authoritative than any text or essay, but there is ...


3

If the main objective is to be permitted to practice law, the options are not limited to law school. One may opt to seeking an apprenticeship at a law firm in certain States of the U.S. and depending on the state (for e.g. California, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, and West Virginia). After a certain number of years, one may be eligible to take the bar exam. ...


3

If you speak German, or can learn it, you can study in Germany. That is not only possible from the EU, but explicitly also for people living outside of the EU, including the USA. For free. Seriously. If you do not speak German, there are only a few lectures on special law topics (1 or 2 years) that may be interesting to specialize on something. The field of ...


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