63

If you are not a member of the Bar of Maryland, you may not "practice, attempt to practice, or offer to practice law in the State unless admitted to the Bar." Maryland Business Occupations and Professions § 10-601. "Practicing law" includes "representing another person before a unit of the State government or of a political subdivision." Maryland Business ...


41

The law is known to everyone in theory. But as various people are said to have said, In theory, theory and practice are the same. In practice, they are not. Starting from zero and actually finding out what law is applicable to your circumstances is not a trivial matter. To have an answer you can rely on you need to do the following: Find out what law ...


21

There are four similar answers here already, all about why it's a good idea to involve an expert. There isn't much engagement with the apparent discrepency you're asking about; the discrepency between high standards of qualification for lawyers and the suggestion that the law is understandable for the typical citizen implied by the claim that "ignorance is ...


17

This depends very much on the nature of the agreement, and whether it affects the client's rights and obligations. It may also depend on which US state this is in. If the agreement is "We will hold the negotiating meetings at your office instead of mine." the client's rights are not affected and the client probably has no veto. If the agreement is "Yes we ...


9

We are not (generally) required to be represented by lawyers in court. Many people do their own legal work. The requirement to be approved by the bar association is a separate consumer protection law, which is a more general instance of the fact that government reserves the right to limit things done as "commerce" that they do not limit when done as an ...


8

One element not touched on so far is the time and effort it takes for courts to support people who are representing themselves. In England & Wales we have had significant problems with an increase in the number of "Litigants in Person" since deep cuts were made to Legal Aid. This has resulted in hearings taking longer, Lawyers and Judges time being ...


6

A legal court is not like school debating where you can make any argument to support your case. There are strict rules about admissible evidence. There are rules about which documents you must give to the other side before the trial begins. There are rules for how to ask questions of witnesses. And in a common law legal system simply knowing the statutes is ...


5

If a defendant has committed a crime, they would choose to self-represent to ensure that no one else would know about the circumstances of their crime. Although lawyers are ethically bound to not disclose information that would not be in the interest of their client, the decision to breach this duty would be up to the sole discretion of the ...


5

Yes and No In the lower court (Amtsgericht), yes you can proceed without a lawyer, but for certain cases. In those cases and in the upper courts, you have to have a lawyer. That is called "Anwaltspflicht" or "Anwaltszwang". You need a lawyer whenever the case is in the layers of Landgericht, Oberlandesgericht, Oberstes Landesgericht, ...


3

You should apply for a Beratungshilfeschein at your local court (Amtsgericht), if you cannot afford a lawyer. See link for list of documents (passport, registration, rent cobtract, financial situation) that you will need to show. You should collect all relevant information to the case (as you would when bringing this to a lawyer for the first time), which ...


3

My best guess would be that they're recommending that you get a lawyer if you're trying to get your money back from the thief. A criminal prosecution may not be able to do that.


3

As a person who has done a large amount of (mostly successful) pro se work, I have long advised people against doing pro se litigation in any case where they attach serious value to their case. There are, of course, people who are well-suited to the task, but even if you have a natural aptitude for the core tasks involved (legal research, legal analysis, ...


3

when is it a good idea to get a lawyer? Only when you are not confident that you can put enough dedication to the matter & learning curve, or when you are not confident of your ability to cope with the emotional/frustrating toll of judicial proceedings. I do not mean this in an ironic way or to challenge you. It is just important to avoid a false sense ...


3

Generally, a managing member of an LLC cannot speak for the LLC in court. The LLC needs to hire a licensed lawyer to do that. The general rule is that entities may not represent themselves "pro se" through non-lawyer officers and must have a licensed attorney represent them in any court matter (in practice, a court will usually allow an officer or manager ...


3

No. The U.S. Attorney brings charges on behalf of the United States, which is the filing party, at least in criminal cases. That's why every criminal case is styled "United States v. [Whomever]."


2

No If they do not earn a reward they can give legal advice but they cannot represent you. From s24 of the Lawyers and Conveyancers Act 24 Reserved areas of work for lawyers and incorporated law firms (1) A person commits an offence— (a) who, for gain or reward (whether direct or indirect) and not being a lawyer or an incorporated law firm, ...


2

IANAL Let's see. We have an offender, who committed some form of fraud against the bank (he used your card and Pin to identify as you to get access) to yours and the bank's damage (he was not allowed to take the money). Now, there are two ways the offender can be tried for: As you are harmed, you can sue for damages, as could the bank, but for them you ...


2

This is one situation where I suspect that Germany doesn't differ too much from the United States. Ordinarily, you would contact both courts to explain the situation and ask how to obtain a rescheduling of one or both of the court dates. Sometimes, it would be necessary to make a written request to do so in advance of the hearing. Depending upon the nature ...


2

You can call the public defender's office and ask for advise on the matter. They have phones for that purpose (among others). However, if the defendant accepts the invitation of the prosecutor or law enforcement to chat or agrees to the Prosecutor's request without understanding what he's agreeing too, that's not the failure of the process. You have a ...


2

It should be someone authorized to sign agreements on behalf of the company. Company policy or bylaws will indicate who is authorized, and if that power can be delegated. Generally it is someone fairly senior, but the exact position can vary. Such agreements usually include an assertion that that person signing is authorized to do so.


1

You beg the question (since explicitly raised in edits to the original question): Does anybody know the entire body of law? At least in the U.S. the answer is apparently: No! Not even lawyers know every law. Most citizens don't even know what is encompassed by the term, "law." (As I said in a comment elsewhere, "So you somehow managed to find and digest ...


1

When to stop responding to repetitive pre-action letters? At what point do I overrule my lawyers and decide to call the other side's bluff and stop responding? There are no guidelines for neither the timing for, nor the pertinence of, ignoring pre-action letters. More important: You mention that your ex-girlfriend "has more money than sense", yet also you ...


1

Most parts of the US have a legal aid group that helps indigent with matters that plague underprivileged. Some cities, for example, have legal aid attorneys that help folks who are having their homes repossessed by banks in a civil action called foreclosure, while others have groups that help immigrants with their visa procedures. Further, many attorneys ...


1

Should one be unconditionally honest with their lawyer whenever one is being charged with a crime ? Yes. Otherwise, the defendant risks doing one or more of the following: (1) hinder the litigation strategy his lawyer devised; (2) increase the likelihood of inconsistencies that can only hurt the defendant's credibility on factors relevant to the ...


1

To your second question, the answer is THE TRUTH. If you did it, tell your lawyer this. If you didn't do it, tell your lawyer this. Never lie to your lawyer because it will backfire on you. Keep in mind, this is the entire reason for Attorney Client Privilege - So that no matter what you say to your lawyer, you are not legally confessing to a crime and a ...


1

Don't know about New Zealand, but in the United States, any law student who agreed to do this would probably not be worth the money you paid. I don't think any state permits law students to practice the law, and every student knows that. There are some exceptions, but the only ones I know of involve work for the government or nonprofits, and still require ...


1

I'm in Canada, so some of this may be different in other countries. According to a 2013 study, the most common reasons why people have self-represented are the following: Finances (p. 38): either they had but could no longer afford counsel, or they could not afford counsel to begin with. This is the most common reason. Problems with counsel (p. 44): either ...


1

...under what situation would compel someone to self-represent? Your grammar appears to be incorrect; I think what you intended to write is "feel compelled." Compel (Collins English Dictionary) means to force or constrain, as to do something or to get or bring about by force. No court compels or forces an individual to self-represent in a criminal ...


1

In the US, the rule is that once you assert your 5th Amendment rights, interrogation is supposed to stop: this does not even require you to have been arrested. If you have been arrested, then once you've lawyered up, you can look for an attorney. "If you cannot afford an attorney, one will be provided for you". Phone rights depend on the state. In Nevada ...


1

This is analogous to a "contingent fee" where the lawyer only gets paid if they win the case. In at least some jurisdictions, yes, this is considered unethical and not allowed in criminal cases. See for instance the American Bar Association's Model Rules of Professional Conduct, Rule 1.5 (d) (2): (d) A lawyer shall not enter into an arrangement for, ...


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