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1. United States It is recognized that the right to meaningful access to courts generally requires access to adequate resources under the Fourth Amendment. "More importantly, [the U.S. Supreme] Court's experience indicates that pro se petitioners are capable of using lawbooks to file cases raising claims that are serious and legitimate [...] therefore, ...


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When you need information like this, you generally just need to start searching court websites. If the case is in a court's online database, just having one party's name will almost always be enough to find the case. Unfortunately, our court systems are so balkanized that proving the negative -- that Hamilton never sued anyone over "Pulsar" -- ...


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Given the following: We know the name of the plaintiff, The name is likely to be unique so that there won't be too many cases involving a different party with the same name, and The plaintiff is a company so it is not likely to have been involved in an overwhelming number of cases (as opposed to e.g. the IRS); The approach I would use would be to search a ...


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One domain with lots of confusion is the names of natural persons (that is, excluding corporations and similar entities that are sometimes considered legal persons). One difficulty is the lack of consistent meanings in different areas of the law. "Legal name" or "full name" can mean one thing to the department of motor vehicles in a state,...


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It depends on whose law you are interested in, and what area of law (suits) you want to know about, for what purpose. The easiest DIY approach is to read appellate decisions in the area of interest, for example breach of contract (which is still way to vague). Such opinions from the US are often made available on the internet with free services like Findlaw, ...


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You've described the subject matter of the discipline of language and law within linguistics. Insofar as all law is promulgated with linguistic expressions and the potential for ambiguity in language is very high, there are plenty of examples, indeed an enterprise of taxonomizing the types of ambiguity. In addition, the legal profession has adopted a number ...


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I use Westlaw and Practical Law (paid services) for this. I'm in the UK but I know they also cover other jurisdictions. If I know the particular piece of legislation I am interested in, Westlaw allows you to view a specific part (e.g. a section, rule, article, or regulation number) and from there you can view cases which have referred to that. "Key ...


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Try worldcat.org. It knows the catalog of most libraries in the world. You look up a book or periodical and enter your location. I’m in CA and I found four libraries that have The Listener within 25 miles of me. Wikipedia references a 1976 issue for one of the items.


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For Elective Dictatorship you could try visiting, or if that's not feasible, ordering a copy from the British Library. And there's also the Bodleian Library. Details on how to join are here if you're not already a member.


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