7

In general, you still need to pay for the drink. If you had purchased the drink (on credit, ie a tab or similar as you appear to have done), and you had offered the vendor CASH, and he had refused, [if you can prove you offered him cash] he would be unable to pursue you for the debt (technically you would still owe it to him, but as he had declined ...


6

Yes This statute means that all United States money as identified above is a valid and legal offer of payment for debts when tendered to a creditor. There is, however, no Federal statute mandating that a private business, a person, or an organization must accept currency or coins as payment for goods or services. Private businesses are free to develop ...


5

While it is true that cash is legal tender, this can still be overridden by mutual agreement (i.e. in a contract). So the legal tender status only matters if payment methods were not agreed upon before entering into an agreement. In other words: If a restaurant lets you eat without telling you they do not accept cash, they will have to accept cash. However, ...


4

Your understanding of “legal tender” is flawed There is plenty of case law to show that governments can place reasonable restrictions on payment by legal tender up to and including excluding it entirely. Picano v Borough of Emerson explains this very succinctly: Finally, there is no basis for concluding that defendants violated 31 U.S.C. § 5103. Section ...


4

Yes, you can charge for providing a service Even if many businesses provide that service for free.


3

Title 31 (Money and Finance), Subtitle IV (Money), Chapter 51 (Coins and Currency), Subchapter I (Monetary System), Section 5103 (Legal Tender) of the United States Code states: United States coins and currency (including Federal reserve notes and circulating notes of Federal reserve banks and national banks) are legal tender for all debts, public ...


3

You didn't consent to being ripped off. You did however fail to grasp the terms under which you were permitted to park on their property, and you failed to pursue an alternative (such as looking for change; using a credit card). It is possible that you should have known that this was a no-change-given machine, since one can often see that there is no ...


2

It doesn't even have to be pennies. Any cash denomination is open to discretion. The Federal Reserve tells us "There is, however, no Federal statute mandating that a private business, a person, or an organization must accept currency or coins as payment for goods or services. "


2

They don't have to accept cash - they could make arrangements for you to return with a different card, for you to send a cheque through the post, for you to make a direct transfer to their account, or they could waive the cost of the meal. For all but the last option, you have a debt with them which they could recover through court if payment wasn't ...


1

I was wondering if there is a disposition for small claims court that was settled via arbitration (no appeal is allowed and the decision is final) - then would it be unlawful to pay more than the extra amount? Normally, when a case is resolved via arbitration, the arbitration award is filed with a court together with a motion to "confirm" that ...


1

Yes, they are legal tender. 31 USC 5103: United States coins and currency (including Federal reserve notes and circulating notes of Federal reserve banks and national banks) are legal tender for all debts, public charges, taxes, and dues. They are United States coins so they are legal tender. The age of the coins is irrelevant and I don't think that the ...


1

If a business literally has an "exact change only" policy, that can't be enforced in post-pay situations. But if they have a "you are free to overpay, but we won't give you change back", that's different, especially if it's communicated from the beginning. If they tell you they don't give change, then you're taking their goods/services ...


1

I provided an answer to a similar question regarding paying with pennies here. I touch on what I think is a conceptually related issue related to restrictions on methods of payment after service is rendered in an answer here. Perhaps a fully generalized answer might be as follows: unless the payee can demonstrate that the payer knew, or that the payer ...


1

The restaurant is not legally required to accept pennies as a method of payment. However, what is the outcome of this situation going to be? They call the police? There is no crime, only a contract dispute over the method of payment. The police will probably take a report, separate the parties and tell you to take it to court. Take it to court? Judgment for ...


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