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1

I just had the brilliant idea to ask a firm specialising in contract law for help, and they confirmed that the example sentences that I list in my question are indeed correct :)


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how it's used According to this source A call-off contract, also known as a blanket order, is a purchase order which enables bulk orders over a period of time. This is a form of framework agreement that is often used in construction where projects can last for months or even years. The benefit of using a call-off contract is that it allows the supply of ...


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A country can assert jurisdiction irrespective of whether or not they can practically enforce it or whether that assertion is accepted or contested by other countries.


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Are there any legal terms which can make it clear that such questions are about the "outside of reach" rather than "outside of claim of reach" situations? Enforceability Laws that claim but cannot reach lack enforceability. Note that enforceability is case-specific and subjective. The US may or may not be able to reach out to those it ...


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Note that this depends on the jurisdiction. In england-and-wales, it is not illegal to give legal advice other than in specific cases. Reserved and non-reserved legal activities Section 14(1) of the Legal Services Act 2007 provides that you need to be entitled to carry out "reserved legal activities". Entitled here means that are either authorised ...


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It’s what a reasonable person in the position of the parties would consider “significant” The reasonable person test is well established in common law and under it, an item will be of significant value if a reasonable person would consider it to be such. This would include considerations of its value: in absolute terms relative to the size of the estate ...


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It first depends on what state you are dealing with. This expression shows up in standard forms in Georgia, where it is not defined. You can read the associated statutes (Georgia Code, Title 53) especially the definitions, and it won't tell you. The probate court rules also don't tell you. So in Georgia, it would be "what a reasonable person would ...


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