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2 votes

What is the difference between a judge and a justice?

Its like the difference between “Colonel” and “Sir” australia The rules are nicely complicated and depend on the particular judicial officer’s place in the court hierarchy. The term justice only ...
Dale M's user avatar
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4 votes
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What is the difference between a judge and a justice?

There are two kinds of judges who are commonly referred to as "Justices" in the United States. First, judges on state supreme courts or the U.S. Supreme Court are called "Justices"....
ohwilleke's user avatar
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0 votes
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Can I legally bypass software when their data is freely available?

You can definitely legally never use the manufacturer's software. But you need to consider: Whether, if you have used their software in the past, you agreed to a contract where you promised not to ...
interfect's user avatar
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1 vote

Is "Innocent until proven guilty" merely a cliche used in legal dramas?

I was in the jury pool a couple years back for a murder trial. Houston, Texas. The presiding judge opened with the question, "Is {defendant's name} guilty or innocent?" He paused to let us ...
EvilSnack's user avatar
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21 votes

Is "Innocent until proven guilty" merely a cliche used in legal dramas?

The comment which sparked this question was in relation to how the phrase is used in that question, specifically: Does that mean “innocent until proven guilty” is to be taken literally? Even though ...
Greendrake's user avatar
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30 votes

Is "Innocent until proven guilty" merely a cliche used in legal dramas?

Innocent until proven Guilty is more than a stock phrase Trials happen all the time. In most Western societies and legal systems, trials start by setting out the rules. By restating the rules, again ...
Trish's user avatar
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48 votes

Is "Innocent until proven guilty" merely a cliche used in legal dramas?

"Innocent until proven guilty" or "innocent until proved guilty" can be found in English in, among others: The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, article 11: "Everyone ...
Lag's user avatar
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13 votes

Is "Innocent until proven guilty" merely a cliche used in legal dramas?

The phrase "Innocent until proven guilty" is not relegated to "cliche for legal dramas." It and related phrases are used ubiquitously, sometimes in conjunction with a notion of a ...
Jen's user avatar
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