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Different socities, including some that are not considered sovereign nations, create laws, that is enforceable rules of conduct, in different ways. Not all write them down. But they are all Law in that they are rulwa that societies can and will enforce mon their members. I recommend reading Legal Systems Very Different from Ours by David D. Friedman (...


3

I take it that the author is saying that when a set of facts fit the general rules of an area of law, but do not fit the "more nuanced cases" of a specific kind of law, that indicates that those facts will not make out a prima facie case in that specific area. That may or may not be a correct statement of legal theory—your point about new issues ...


3

Yes though usually adverbs are not subject to statutory definition, so case law resolves most interpretive questions. But, 18 USC 1515: (b) As used in section 1505, the term “corruptly” means acting with an improper purpose, personally or by influencing another, including making a false or misleading statement, or withholding, concealing, altering, or ...


2

Not really. There are very specific subfields that have that kind of practice (e.g. oil and gas title opinions, or trust and estates inheritance rules). But none of the fields you mention have any well established "industry standard" methods. This isn't to say that no one uses diagrams, and some textbooks use good ones. But there isn't any widely ...


2

You can’t have complete mathematics; you have no chance of a complete legal system Godel’s incompleteness theorems tell us that mathematics has no complete, consistent and finite set of axioms that can prove every correct statement. If we can’t do it for something as logical as maths, we certainly can’t do it for anything involving things as messy as people. ...


2

Does a law have to be a written law in order to be a legal law? No. Their laws are binding to them even if they are not in writing. To some extent that happens also in modern, bigger civilizations insofar as verbal contracts are binding and enforceable. Likewise, many common practices and customary laws are not in writing, yet they have can be dispositive ...


2

Those are just three ways of saying the same thing, there is no legal difference. One could also say: The parties to this agreement are NameA and NameB. This agreement is entered into among NameA, NameB, and Name C. NameA and NameB have entered into this agreement as of {date}. All these have the same legal effect, to list the parties to the agreement, and ...


1

It isn't common to do so. Normally, you would define an "incident" or an "occurrence" or a "scheme", for certain events that happened, but you would ordinarily reserve the legal effect of what happened to a separate spelled out cause of action for each such type of wrong. If you need to say something like "negligently and/...


1

Jurisprudence is the philosophy of law Jurisprudence is not the same as law just like metaphysics is not physics and theology is not religion. The study of law is specific to a specific legal system, like Greek law, English law, Sharia law etc. Jurisprudence is the study of the general principles behind and between these specific legal traditions. For ...


1

The definition of what constitutes a law is up to each sovereign nation. Most have a process these days where laws are voted in parliament, countersigned by somebody, and officially published before they take effect. Obviously a society without written language would have a different process. Supposedly the Romans decided in 451 BC to write their laws down ...


1

You can't legally represent someone without being authorised or exempt under sections 18 and 19 of the Legal Services Act 2007: This is because both the "right of audience" and the "conduct of litigation" is a reserved legal activity under section 12 of the Act: (1) In this Act “reserved legal activity” means— (a) the exercise of a right ...


1

Besides "section" in the common law, it can have different meanings in other legal systems. For example, in Germany, § marks a "Paragraf".


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