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2

Possibly. In order to win in such a lawsuit, you would have to prove that the damage resulted from the contractor's negligent actions or inactions. To show this, you have have to establish exactly what was done (or not done) by the contractor that resulted in damage, and you must show that this was not a decision that would be made by a professional ...


2

Could you insure yourself either given the fact that- you bought the property on mortgage? A mortgage does not generally have the legal effect of insurance. You owe the debt to the lender, which is a strict liability obligation, without regard to the value of the collateral. So, if the collateral is devalued, you still owe the debt, whether or not the ...


1

Can an employee be sued? Option A: An organization does not have password policy. Option B: An organization has a policy but does not enforce it Short Answer It would be up to the jury (or judge in a bench trial) to decide based upon the facts in that particular case following an evidentiary trial on the merits. There is no black and white rule ...


1

In general, a contract will state who the parties to the contract are, often near the top of the contract. If the contract says that the parties are "John Jones" (the instructor) and "Great Bend Yoga Studio" Jones may be bound personally, even if Jones signs as manager of "Jones Courses, LLC". It is better practice for the contract to be written so that it ...


2

SHORT ANSWER The hold harmless agreement binds you individually if you sign it individually. But, you may have liability to the firm you are contracting with as a matter of law anyway, as an individual, unless that is expressly waived by contract with the person who might otherwise sue you. You should get liability insurance for yourself and your LLC. If ...


0

Option A: definitely no. There is no possibility for that to happen. Option B: Maybe. It really depends in what actually the company did after creating the policy. did they create the policy and let it sit on a drawer and did nothing else --> No. did they create the policy and: a) informed the users about it     a.1) have no proof of informing all users ...


1

It depends (of course). Has the employee been negligent? Did the employee know (or should they have known) that using a bad password was a bad idea? If the employer had a password policy which they enforced, then presumably the breach would not have occurred. (Although PasswordOctober19! will pass almost all rules but is a very weak password.) If the ...


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Firstly: that depends on the jurisdiction. It might not even be possible at all for employers to attempt to sue their own employees for damages caused by negligence. Even terminating an employment contract for reasons of negligence is quite difficult in many jurisdictions. Second, if it is possible, the question is wether such legal proceedings could be ...


3

No more than using your own phone, eyeglasses or underwear while working for the LLC. These are all tools of trade than one wold expect employees of the LLC to bring to their job (especially underwear). There is potentially a problem if assets of the LLC are alienated for personal use rather than the other way around. However, that would be subject to a ...


4

If an employee takes home information that his or her employer considers confidential, that would be a matter of company policy. The employer could discipline or fire the employee if it learned of the incident, and chose to act. If the information is considered to be a trade secret, or part of one, disclosing it or mishandling it so as to risk disclosure ...


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