5

The Gnu General Public License text specifically refers to versions published by the Free Software Foundation when availing yourself of the “or any later version” option: If the Program specifies that a certain numbered version of the GNU General Public License “or any later version” applies to it, you have the option of following the terms and conditions ...


4

It isn't necessarily "illegal" (in the sense you are committing a crime) but you may be in violation of a verbal contract (which would fall under tort law). Let's take this a bit further. Perhaps Joe Schmoe gave you his debit card information so that you could make deposits for him and he said you could take $5 out for yourself for the trouble. This is a ...


4

Not the free version Your use is commercial so you have to buy the software which (presumably) allows commercial use.


3

Uniform just means the same and license agreement means, well ... license agreement. So the decision means that every OEM has to have the same license agreement as every other OEM - Microsoft cannot make preferential deals with some OEMs and not with others.


3

Yes. A license is a legal form of permission to do something (usually, to use a particular property, whether real or digital or intellectual) and the conditions applied to that use. Different licenses for the same property are extremely common, for example, a free license for hobby or non-profit work and a paid license for commercial usage. Other ...


3

You can licence your copyright under as many licences as you like to as many people as you like It's your copyright - you can do what you want with it. What you can't do is give someone an exclusive licence and then give licences to others - that would be a breach of contract with the exclusive licensee. How you let people know about the available ...


2

All of the statements in the license have to be complied with. The no reverse engineering requirement must be obeyed by all. Section 14 lists some additional conditions that are not applicable to everyone, and (d) specifically limits use of the software made available under the academic license at the time of acquisition – you must be student, staff or ...


2

Not very novel What you are talking about is a derivative work. This is arguably the most famous example: It's an interesting example because Leonardo da Vinci did not have copyright in the original but Marcel Duchamp and Francis Picabia do have copyright in the derivative. Even though the changes are physically small, they are enough. A crucial factor ...


1

Sorry, I'll have to opt for a no-quotes answer. The question is, does your answer have the scintilla of creativity required for copyright protection? That creativity arises from identifying relevant text from elsewhere, deciding how much is relevant, eliminating superfluous verbiage, collecting a relevant set of such texts (assuming that the parts of an ...


1

Legal unless you violate copyright. Screenshots will probably be fair use. The manuals/how-tos need to be your originals, not copies from anywhere.


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