45

You need to know two things about the GPL: The GPL is a license which requires that when you distribute binaries, you distribute the source code with them (binaries being the things you can directly run) The GPL is viral - any project using something licensed under the GPL must also be licensed under the GPL The easiest way to comply with the first point ...


40

I don't see how. Remember that a license is a contract where the author gives permission to copy (modify, redistribute, remix, etc) a copyrighted work, provided that the licensee fulfills the stated conditions. If the license is not in effect, then we revert to the default situation under copyright law, which is that the potential licensee has no rights to ...


28

It depends on exactly how you are "using" the GPL code. If you have copied and modified the source code then you can only distribute copies under the GPL. If you have invoked a GPL program as a separate process so that your code can use its output then you can distribute your program without the source code, as long as you comply with the terms of ...


13

What you have been told is incorrect. You are in no way required to release your product under an open source license, nor to publish it in any form. If you do "convey" a work that is under the GPL, or a modified version of a work under the GPL, then you must provide the source code, and include the GPL license text, and for a modified version, ...


12

In practice, it is abundantly clear to which entity the “Free Software Foundation” refers, even if the FSF were to change its name, even if there are unaffiliated organizations with the same name. Version 3 of the GPL also contains a link to the FSF website, making it clear which organization this referred to in 2007 when the license text was published. If ...


6

For your case specifically, the API for that library is licensed under MIT, not GPL. MIT is non-viral, so as long as you only call into the API for that library, you do not need to make your code open-source.


4

Yes and no. Yes: If you post something to a personal website or blog, you can use whatever license and requirements (as long as they are legal) that you like. If you require people to strip naked and dance in Antarctica, then that’s your requirement. No: If you are posting to a website you don’t own, they will have requirements you have to agree to before ...


3

You are not "citing" the image - a citation is a reference to a (scholarly) work from another work, you are attributing a work that you have directly copied. The licence tells you what you must do: Attribution — You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable ...


2

To address a comment by OP on Paul White's answer, about the paragraph "and from How do I properly attribute material offered under a Creative Commons license?:" Additionally, you may satisfy the attribution requirement by providing a link to a place where the attribution information may be found. The comment was: It would seem if the method of ...


2

I did some research and found the information below. It took me a while to figure out that the issue is known in German as "Insichgeschäft". The quotes below are translations from Wikipedia. The term self-dealing is also used in Switzerland. It is regulated in Art. 32 ff. OR. The Federal Supreme Court has consistently ruled that self-contracting ...


1

Create a page on your website titled "Image attributions", to contain a list of the images and the attribution text. Place a link to your image attributions page in the footer of the website, along with the other links to things like your terms of service, privacy policy and cookie settings (as required). Scroll down to see a footer with this kind ...


1

Open Source as defined by the Open Source Initiative is very much about being able to use the software freely, without purpose limitations. So your partner's lawyer is on point. I also like their suggestion of Apache-2, but that is a very business-friendly license. There are of course some open-source-ish licenses that do try to rule out some commercial ...


1

Preface This answer assumes that OP has a GPL'ed modified work he is distributing to his friends, and wants to avoid giving them his modifications to the source code. If by "uses another software" he means he simply executes their unmodified executable, then this answer would probably, depending on the exact details, be quite different (for example ...


1

You are using open source software in your project. You are allowed to do that because of the open source license. Most likely (for example for GPL licensed software) you are allowed to do the following: Create and use software that is derived from the open source software, without any obligation to you. Distribute your modified software IF you distribute ...


1

Not if you host it on a web server. If you host a program containing open source code on a web server, you don't need to abide by the terms of the open source licenses and distribute the source code to the people who access your server, because you're technically not considered as distributing the code. This is also known as the "SaaS (Software as a ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible