4

It is reasonable to interpret the statement in their Github repository README.md as a "public domain" license for anything contained there. However, their "usage guidelines" backpedals a bit ("generally are not copyrighted", the misleading implication that content used commercially is subject to restrictions that educational and personal uses are not subject ...


3

When a company stops existing for whatever reason, then its assets (physical, financial, intellectual or otherwise) don't stop existing. When the company dissolves voluntarily, those assets usually go to the owner(s) of the company. When the company got bought up and integrated into another company, the buying company will usually own them. When the company ...


3

You can read it, you can examine it to the point where you understand it, and then you can get inspired by the code and write your own code, without copying the code on the website, which does the same thing. If there is no license, then you can do what copyright law allows you to do. You are not allowed to copy the code, or create derived works by taking ...


3

Defining the value of a privately held company is hard (tax returns don't provide a very informative basis because accountants will tend to under-value things like "goodwill" in order to avoid paying tax). However that doesn't matter for this stack, because the only legal question is: If I had some means of coming up with a number and presenting it, ...


2

What do I need to do? You should explain the counterparty why the terms of the clause are impractical (or perhaps unduly burdening), and propose amendments thereto. In every contract to which you are a party, you need to ensure that its terms are clear to you. Never be shy to ask for clarifications and have them reflected in the binding contract. That is ...


2

If running Linux on same physical computer as Windows, can one legally use Microsoft's files? Apparently not. The fonts would be considered a feature of the software. Even mounting the Windows file system in your Linux partition, as opposed to copying the fonts, would violate the terms of the license. That is because the terms of the license allow the ...


1

No, you cannot do that based just on the EULA. You need to talk to the product owners and make a deal. The Product may be incorporated into, and may incorporate itself, into software and other technology owned or controlled by third parties. Although the EULA mentions third parties, it is focused on what end users (the "second" parties) can do with the ...


1

Probably First of all, a warranty is different from a guarantee under Australian Consumer Law (ACL). The license purports to exclude the former but not the latter. So, on a literal reading, the license doesn't offend the ACL and is probably fine on that basis alone although this may not be what the licensor intended. Notwithstanding, even if "warranty" and ...


1

If you read their user agreement, you will see that the content which is available to those who have a subscription may be owned by the company, or may be owned by users who upload such content. They allow content owners to specify license terms. §7 of the agreement is where the uploader licenses material to the company: you hereby grant to Musescore a ...


1

Software licenses, like most text documents, are protected by copyright. You don't have a right to just copy someone else's software license. You have even less rights to create a derived work by modifying someone else's software license (and in practice you would have to do that, even if only to change company and product names). The creators of the GPL ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible