New answers tagged

2

It will be fact-specific, but potentially not unlocking your phone for such a reason could be a "reasonable excuse". However, you will need to provide evidence for such an excuse. The prosecution will still have to prove, beyond reasonable doubt, that the excuse is not "reasonable". It is entirely possible that the court would determine ...


3

The law says you need to be covered by a TV Licence to: watch or record programmes as they’re being shown on TV, on any channel watch or stream programmes live on an online TV service (such as ITV Hub, All 4, YouTube, Amazon Prime Video, Now TV, Sky Go, etc.) download or watch any BBC programmes on iPlayer. This applies to any device you use, including a ...


0

Start with the facts as published: TV Licensing website Which says: The law says you need to be covered by a TV Licence to: watch or record programmes as they’re being shown on TV, on any channel watch or stream programmes live on an online TV service (such as ITV Hub, All 4, YouTube, Amazon Prime Video, Now TV, Sky Go, etc.) download or watch any BBC ...


3

Officers get to be tricky The problem here is you're expecting the TV enforcement officers to deal fairly and not pull dirty tricks or be manipulative. There's no legal obligation for them to do that, just as there's no legal obligation for police detectives to not trick you. There are limits to what you can do, but this is where we get into the difference ...


5

It is currently a criminal offence, and as such the same procedures (including "innocent until proved guilty") apply as with any other criminal offence. If entry to premises is required to obtain evidence, the court can issue a warrant. However the reality of the situation is that almost all the defendants who are summoned to court (about 120,000 ...


11

In legal terms, the "innocent until proven guilty" principle still holds. However, the dirty tactics utilised by licensing officers try all sorts of underhand tricks to disregard "innocent until proven guilty". The general advice is that you should not engage with such licensing officers in any way, unless they actually have a search ...


25

Sorry Matthew, that is wrong. But lets start with the Ops statement "In the UK you have to state that you don't have a TV license and sign a declaration to that effect every 2 years (unless you then get a license)." You do not have to state this at all. You are under NO legal obligation to reply to TVLA's letters. All that will happen is they will ...


36

The system operates on "innocent until proven guilty" If you watch or record live television or you download or watch programmes on BBC iPlayer (live, catch up, or on demand), you must have a TV licence. You do not have to let TV Licensing officers into your home unless they have a warrant, per Section 366 of the Communications Act 2003. They will ...


2

The bike was signed over to A, which constitutes a sale. So A owns the bike. He can sell his bike as he sees fit. Further, A should have responded to all tickets with identifying B as the driver.


4

Yes, you can fork it - but you can’t use it GitHub explain what’s a public deposit with no licence means here. If you find software that doesn’t have a license, that generally means you have no permission from the creators of the software to use, modify, or share the software. Although a code host such as GitHub may allow you to view and fork the code, this ...


1

Without a license you fall back on basic copyright - and the copyright owner has not granted any rights to you to distribute their code or derivatives of their code. Github also does not grant you any rights to do so. So, yes you can fork the repository, but you cannot distribute it or any derivative code you base on it even for non-commercial use - the ...


0

Under Indian law you own copyright in your code as soon as it is created, without any need for registration formalities. You are then free to license other people to use that code as you see fit. The AGPL is one way of doing this. So the answer to your question is that you don't need to register anything. Just put copyright messages at the top of your source ...


2

This is similar to giving a hammer and needing to state to one is not responsible if the taker uses it to hit their head with. I believe this is the wrong analogy to use here. It would be more like giving somebody a hammer and saying you are not responsible if the head flies off and injures you. There is a concept in "things" you obtain called &...


-4

I do not think your question makes sense. To aid discussion, let me introduce a concrete example. I think everyone knows that making death threats against the president of the united states is a federal offense. If you write a program that automates the process of sending death threats against the president, have you boken the law? I don't think so. IANAL ...


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