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I see no reason to doubt your conclusion; since it's not allowed by the license it's forbidden by copyright. As you figured it, you gain the right to use these tools by obtaining one of those 3 Visual Studio licenses. A Visual Studio Code license is free, so it makes business sense that it doesn't include a license for Microsoft C++ Build Tools. I.e. you ...


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Its completely allowed to use the domain name with java in it based on the trademark policy: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nominative_use As specified in the last comment of the link , the domain owner of javaslang wanted it to protect the domain as a trademark and that's where the problem arose and they changed the name.


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(This post is only to provide a general definition of the word. I am not telling you how to interpret the contract; you should consult a lawyer for that.) "Gratis" means, as in the link you posted, "without reward or consideration". It's basically a synonym for "free of charge". "On a gratis basis" is just a longer way of saying the same thing. The ...


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It seems relatively clear that you owe them 5%... Royalty You agree to pay Epic a royalty equal to 5% of all worldwide gross revenue actually attributable to each Product, regardless of whether that revenue is received by you or any other person or legal entity, as follows: a. Gross revenue resulting from any and all sales of a Product to ...


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Word and Excel files are stored in Open Office XML format1 As the name suggests, this is an open format - specifically, it’s a bunch of zipped XML text files. Change the extension of any office file to .xml and you can open them with any zip program. 1Since 2007. However, that begs the question ... Copyright law allows reverse engineering, particularly ...


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Reads to me like you're answering your own question. For the most part, users must have the opportunity to view the privacy policy before the data is actually used. For mobile apps/apps there are various options to fulfil this obligation: Making the privacy policy available on the App Store; Display inside the app and immediately before the first start of ...


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No, since you are a Canadian resident, you are required to have a driver's licence that is issued in Canada. For British Columbia, you are required to do so within 90 days. If you have not done so yet and it has been longer than the given period you are driving illegaly Once you have converted/switched your California licence to a British Columbian (...


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Why does it have this exception at the end, if purpose is to protect author from being held liable? The exception is so poorly written that it actually increases the risk of liability, thereby potentially defeating the purpose of the disclaimer. It seems to me that what the drafter had in mind was something akin to this: The licensor/author/contributor (...


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This travel StackExchange question has some relevant discussion. CVC §12505 goes into more detail than the fragments that are extracted and appear on the California DMV web site. (a) (1) For purposes of this division only and notwithstanding Section 516, residency shall be determined as a person’s state of domicile. “State of domicile” means the ...


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From the CA DMV website https://www.dmv.ca.gov/portal/dmv/detail/pubs/brochures/fast_facts/ffdl05 Residency Documents You must provide 2 California residency documents if applying for a DL, renewing a California commercial DL, or converting to a REAL ID Compliant DL. DMV will not accept an application without the accompanying residency ...


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The copyright holder can licence on whatever terms they like A licence that allows use only on Tuesdays in months with a “y” in them is a totally valid licence.


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If Alice, Bob, and Cassandra are working on the program and releasing it as a joint work, the copyright statement should reflect it: Copyright (c) 2017 Alice, Bob, Cassandra If, on the other hand, Bob and Cassandra are taking advantage of the "modify" clause of the MIT license to create derivative works, the copyright statements are required by the ...


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There are 190+ sovereign nations in the world - generalization is not possible However, if it’s legal in each relevant country, there’s no reason to believe it wouldn’t be legal between them. That said, the risk involved increases massively as cross-border enforcement is considerably more difficult than the already difficult single jurisdiction enforcement.


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I think that there probably is consideration to be found in an open source licence, I wrote my dissertation on this question 10 years ago: http://willhardy.com.au/legal-essays/oss-consideration/view/ But even when there is no consideration, you can have a bare licence without a contract. This interestingly has some important consequences, for example: a ...


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