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41

The real story is that the articles you link to are logically fallacious. The first hedges its assertions by saying a mailbox is "effectively considered" to be federal property. It cites 18 USC 1705, which it correctly notes "puts your mailbox under Federal jurisdiction." But that's not the same as assuming ownership of it. The piece also says that you "...


36

Reports I've seen are that these seed shipments have false customs declarations, claiming that they contain something else, e.g. this one which was declared as "ring". That would violate 18 USC 542: Whoever enters or introduces, or attempts to enter or introduce, into the commerce of the United States any imported merchandise by means of any ...


22

As indicated here, throwing away mail is the crime of obstructing mail. There is no exception for "junk mail" i.e. standard mail. It is possible (virtually guaranteed) that an individual postmaster or the USPS has a different disposition of the two kinds or mail when returned, but that is about USPS and not you. It is highly unlikely that you will find an ...


15

We have an intersection of two very different effects. Agricultural import laws This is an area of law that normally, consumers have no reason to deal with. However the laws apply to absolutely everyone connected with import of biological items like this. Of course a recipient of unsolicited seeds has no reason to have learned any of this. What scientists ...


9

Close family members can stay as long as the tenant wants The tenant is entitled to "quiet enjoyment" of the property which includes living with their close relatives - spouse, de facto and children would all qualify; parents and siblings might as well. It doesn't matter if these people are children or adults. You cannot contract out of this as you are not ...


4

Junk mail usually identifies the addressee as "John Z. Xmith or current resident." If it says "...or current resident", then by policy it is not to be sent to John Z. Xmith's new address. The current resident is considered the addressee.


4

In the US it is generally illegal for you to open somebody else's mailbox. Your best course of action is to contact your neighbor and let them retrieve the package for you. In practice it might depend on your relationship with your neighbor. If you are good friends, they are unlikely to object or report you to the authorities as they'll be willing to trust ...


4

Assume that this happened in a matter that goes to court. In civil court, there is no "innocent until/unless proven guilty". In civil court, the judge hears everyone's story, and decides which story is more likely to be true. So I tell the judge "I sent a letter by registered mail; this is what was in the letter, and the post office reported to me that ...


4

Residents agree that the receipt of mail by any individual not listed as a Resident or Occupant in this Agreement at the Leased Premises shall be proof of occupancy of that individual and a violation of this Agreement. I assume that the lease states that only the listed individuals can reside in the unit. Maybe they think that this says that receipt ...


4

As for a member of the Universal Postal Union, what repercussions will occur for country B? None. Are they allowed to keep stealing stuff at the sender insurer's expense? Well, country B isn't stealing stuff. Bad actors in the employe of country B are stealing stuff. This is a matter for law enforcement in country B. If country B is endemically corrupt ...


3

There is no clear legal answer, and in case the matter goes to court, the jury would compare actions of the parties. For example, shipper could say "mail it back to us" and recipient could refuse, saying "come pick it up in the next 10 minutes". Both parties are being unreasonable, imposing significant obligations on the other party (time and money, in the ...


2

I would advise calling some law offices to consult if there is a case here, but there are plenty of valid reasons why you could have a package sent to your address with a different name (It's Christmas and you want to keep presents for different people stored and organized, so you have their names on the shipping lable to do this on the cheap. You have a ...


2

Courts almost always have very specific rules for calculating deadlines that vary considerably from one court system to another. In the U.S., the court document usually has a date of mailing at the bottom of the last page under a heading entitled "certificate of service", or a signature date if it is from the court, and the date on that document is usually ...


2

No, it is not necessary to send certified mail 720.303(5) requires "a written request"; emails are a form of writing under law as are text messages, Facebook posts etc. If a dispute arises, the onus is on the owner to prove on the balance of probabilities that "a written request" was made. 720.303(5)(a) provides that a receipt for "certified mail, return ...


2

what actions do I need to take to reclaim my address? Make the address really yours (buy the property). Use your current address for all correspondence. Setup mailbox with address prominently written on it. Approach the neighbor nicely explaining them the situation and ask to stop using the address. If 3 fails, hire a lawyer and instruct them to approach ...


2

It is not illegal to lie per se. But the liar needs to mind the possible consequences: depending on them, lying (e.g. putting wrong return address) may prove illegal. My concern is that whoever is receiving the letters (unlike the ones which were returned to me as "undeliverable"), may be unstable and potentially dangerous. Say the potentially dangerous ...


1

In the US, what is illegal is possession of certain things (drugs; firearms; alcohol; explosives; stolen goods...). Taking Washington drug laws as an example, the numerous prohibitions generally start "It is unlawful for any person knowingly or intentionally...". If you requested it, you are intentionally in possession. If someone sent it to you without your ...


1

It it was delivered to your residence, you received it The evidence from Royal Mail that the package was delivered to a given address is very strong to the point of being almost irrefutable. It doesn't matter who signed for it; if it was your residence the, legally, you received it.


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