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2

In California, each spouse has a vested present interest in 50% of all of the marital property of the couple. The circumstances in which a single spouse can dispose of or transact marital property vis-a-vis a third party are complex in some cases, but in the case of a residence, both spouses would be required to sign off on a sale, even if the residence was ...


3

Ohwilleke's answer provides the basic modern rundown of the theoretical basis for spousal privilege (or privileges, rather, as his answer also details). But we can also jump into the way-back machine to determine where that came from. We'll start with: Protection against self-incrimination Common law jurisdictions trace their origins to the common law of ...


4

When you are giving evidence on the stand you cannot just refuse to say jack or just go with the "I can't recall" thing" Refusing to tell what you know would be contempt of court. Lying would be perjury. Spousal privilege simply frees the spouse from having to either commit one of those or testify against their spouse.


7

Regardless of whether a defendant is a wife or husband in relation to a potential witness, the latter can always refuse to say jack or just go with the "I can't recall" thing. What, will they torture them? What's the point of these "privileges" then? There are actually two separate spousal privileges, the confidential communications ...


1

... any countries' copyright laws ... Here in Germany, we don't have a "Copyright" but an "Urheberrecht". One of the main differences is that the "Urheberrecht" does not define the copyright as some kind of (negotiable) property which is owned by some person or company; instead, it defines that as long as the person who created ...


9

Apparently "alienation of affection" is still a tort in Hawaii, Mississippi, New Mexico, North Carolina, South Dakota and Utah. The assumption originally behind alienation of affection this is that one spouse (most usually the wife) belongs to the other and a third party stole them from the other (husband). This is now archaic, sexist, thinking ...


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