New answers tagged

2

To supplement the points made in other answers, which are good, it is important to note that while physically holding someone down and giving them a shot or pill is one way to enforce a requirement to receive a drug, it is not the only, or the most common way to enforce a violation of this requirement. It is far more common to, for example, pass laws that ...


2

The state can, and does force people to undergo medical treatment without their consent, and indeed against their wills, in cases other than vaccination or contagious disease. In particular, various laws compel treatment of mental illness in some cases without the consent of the patients. in O’Connor v. Donaldson, 422 U.S. 563 (1975) It was held that a state ...


3

In this statement of "Patient Rights & Responsibilities from Nash UNC it is said that: A patient has the right to know the names and the jobs of his or her caregivers. But I do not find any actual law that establishes such a right. Hospitals usually have a policy that doctors and other caregivers must wear name-tags and identify themselves to ...


3

BC employers are required to give workers three days of unpaid personal illness & injury leave per calendar year. However, this protection only applies to workers who have held a job for more than 90 days. If you have not held the job for that long, it does not appear that any protections apply to you. Note that (as of March 2021) there are separate ...


-3

The manager can change the schedule if you are run over by a bus. Or if your urgent need for a specialist makes you collapse on the way to work. I suppose you can judge yourself whether the manager can’t change the schedule or if it is a slight inconvenience for him which is more important than your health. Take the matter to HR. Tell them what’s the worst ...


2

To go beyond what the accepted answer says (that they can refuse) in many circumstances they in fact MUST refuse. Every conceivable test incurs some element of risk. Inserting a needle to draw blood risks nerve damage and infection, for example. These risks may be very small, but if the value of the information gained from the test is even smaller, then ...


0

Insurance companies are usually under no obligation to pay for tests that make no medical sense. You have 2 options Ask your doctor nicely and if it makes medical sense to perform the test basing on your symptoms, I don't see why not. Pay for the test directly out of pocket and still ask nicely :) The doctor can still refuse to perform the test if it will ...


19

If I go to my doctor's office and request that they order a specific blood test for me, can they refuse? Yes. Is there anything in HIPAA (or other laws) that compels a medical professional to order a test that has been requested by their patient? Generally, no. Unless the medical professional has entered into a contract to provide it with the patient ...


38

There is no such legal requirement coming from federal or NY state law. Doctors can refuse treatment when the patient is abusive or the matter is outside the scope of their practice, and that can include a test which requires skills, equipment or a contractual relationship that they don't have. Also if a procedure conflicts with their professional duties (...


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