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52 votes
Accepted

Could a British monarch "go full dictator" if they wish to do so?

Parliamentary Supremacy was established by the Glorious Revolution of 1688 in which James II & VII was deposed by Parliament, and the line of succession was changed by Act of Parliament to favor ...
David Siegel's user avatar
25 votes
Accepted

Legal definitions differentiating 'corporation' and 'private estate' in relation to Duchy of Cornwall

As a matter of law, the Duchy is correct, because a superior court of record agreed, and dismissed the arguments made on the other side. The cited claims from Republic come from a case in the First-...
natso's user avatar
  • 266
16 votes

Could a British monarch "go full dictator" if they wish to do so?

Most of the Royal Prerogative powers are today exercised by the politicians in government, not by the monarch. That is partly a matter of the goodwill of the monarch, but mainly a cultural fact that ...
ajd138's user avatar
  • 257
12 votes
Accepted

Legal obligations towards monarchs

Lèse majesté is not prosecuted in the UK While it is still technically illegal to advocate the abolition of the monarchy under the Treason Felony Act of 1848, more recent freedom of speech laws means ...
Dale M's user avatar
  • 214k
12 votes
Accepted

Why is there a consort coronation for female consorts but not for male ones in the United Kingdom?

There has only been one Prince Consort Albert, the husband of Victoria, was the only Prince Consort in post-conquest English/UK history. It was a title created specifically for him because the ...
Dale M's user avatar
  • 214k
10 votes
Accepted

Why is the Queen of Canada known as Elizabeth II?

Actually, Queen Elizabeth I and Queen Elizabeth II are not sovereigns of any common state. QEI was sovereign of England and Wales and QEII is sovereign of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and ...
Dale M's user avatar
  • 214k
9 votes

Could a British monarch "go full dictator" if they wish to do so?

The Queen COULD have refused to ask Liz Truss to form a government last week. She COULD withhold Royal Assent to a bill that Parliament presented to her. She doesn't (didn't, RIP) do such things. ...
Laurence's user avatar
  • 792
8 votes
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What is the point of a Royal Assent?

Because rituals are important You might well ask what is the point of the ceremony of the Black Rod: Black Rod is best known for their part in the ceremonies surrounding the State Opening of ...
Dale M's user avatar
  • 214k
8 votes

What are the effects on the Crown appointments following the death of a monarch?

Things like Queen's Counsel immediately and automatically become "King's Counsel" A whole group of barristers will have to get new paperwork printed! At some point, domain names will, too: ...
James K's user avatar
  • 996
8 votes

Challenge the appointment of the prime minister

united-kingdom There is no direct legal mechanism for an ordinary member of the public to challenge the monarch's appointment of the Prime Minister such that it could force a different appointment. ...
Lag's user avatar
  • 17.6k
7 votes

What effect does the coronation have after accession had already taken place upon the predecessor’s passing?

Other than the oath (see the Coronation Oath Act), nothing at the ceremony has any legal significance. The coronation is a "symbolic formality." The reign begins at the moment of the ...
Jen's user avatar
  • 61.2k
7 votes

Legal definitions differentiating 'corporation' and 'private estate' in relation to Duchy of Cornwall

In addition to natso's excellent answer, the Duchy does not claim in its accounts that it is not a separate legal entity. It claims "it is not a separate legal entity for tax purposes.' These are ...
abligh's user avatar
  • 306
6 votes
Accepted

Why was no constitutional amendment needed to change the rules on succession to the Canadian throne?

The top courts in both Ontario and Quebec have heard challenges to the Succession to the Throne Act, 2013, both upholding the Act, but for different and somewhat contradicting reasons. For reference, ...
DPenner1's user avatar
  • 4,951
5 votes
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What are the effects on the Crown appointments following the death of a monarch?

I'll note that traditionally the demise of the Crown did cause the authorities (the Parliament, courts, offices under the Crown etc.) deriving from the previous Monarch to cease as the personal nature ...
xngtng's user avatar
  • 6,188
5 votes

Would royal assent be required if the British crown were in abeyance?

Parliament would be able to legislate to choose a claimant, even if there were some irregularity about royal assent. The chain of events could be: For some bizarre reason there is a genuine doubt ...
alexg's user avatar
  • 7,220
4 votes

Challenge the appointment of the prime minister

There's an important step missing from the question (and the other answer): the incoming PM is appointed on the advice - or at least, the recommendation - of the outgoing PM*. It is assumed that the ...
Steve Melnikoff's user avatar
4 votes

If the reigning monarch in a constitutional monarchy commits serious offences like terrorism or mass murder, are they really immune from punishments?

nepal This actually happened in Nepal in 2001. Crown Prince Dipendra shot & killed his parents (the king & queen) and several other members of the royal family before shooting himself in the ...
Michael Seifert's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Could a British monarch refuse royal assent if an act of Parliament was very unpopular?

This would surely be a constitutional crisis in a country where the constitutional order is spread over many separate laws and traditions. The UK is generally accepted as a genuine democracy which has ...
o.m.'s user avatar
  • 18.8k
2 votes

Could a British monarch "go full dictator" if they wish to do so?

The Sovereign has no real power Power in the UK (and Canada, Australia, New Zealand etc) rests with Parliament. This has been the case since the Bill of Rights of 1689. While the sovereign has some ...
Dale M's user avatar
  • 214k
1 vote

Would royal assent be required if the British crown were in abeyance?

canada By Letters Patent of October 1, 1947, the Governor General has the power to grant Royal Assent, and is normally the person to do this in any case.
Jen's user avatar
  • 61.2k
1 vote

What is the point of a Royal Assent?

Jurisdiction: united-kingdom The monarch, in its capacity of granting royal assent, is a component of Parliament. So a "bill passed by the parilament" by definition means a bill which has ...
JBentley's user avatar
  • 8,356
1 vote

Could a British monarch "go full dictator" if they wish to do so?

This would be a constitutional crisis where the formal laws of the government don't allow an easy solution. They couldn't go full dictator, but they could do stuff like suspend parliament. What would ...
Nepene Nep's user avatar
1 vote

Why is the Queen of Canada known as Elizabeth II?

This could be considered to be an extended application of what one might call the "Churchill Rule". Although I am sure neither The Queen nor her advisers could seek to bind their successors in such ...
owjburnham's user avatar

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