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8

No. If the transmuted material is truly gold, which is simply a chemical element, there is no duty to disclose its source if the source is not an illegal one. And, there is no legal prohibition on transmuting other materials into gold via alchemy. In real life, however, the only way to transmute other materials into gold is through a nuclear reactor (fusion ...


6

The Bank of England actually makes this pretty clear with the following line: Legal tender has a very narrow and technical meaning, which relates to settling debts. It means that if you are in debt to someone then you can’t be sued for non-payment if you offer full payment of your debts in legal tender. Essentially, if you are in debt (frequent examples ...


5

It is unlikely that you could successfully sue the bank for breach of contract, but of course the first thing you should do is carefully read the agreement and see exactly what they promised. It is understandable that you would like to get your money right now, but that isn't necessarily guaranteed under the agreement. Assuming there is no statement in the ...


5

It's not a violation because Congress created and gave the Federal Reserve the power to issue Federal Reserve Notes in the Federal Reserve Act which created the Federal Reserve. More here on the relationship between Congress and the Fed: https://www.bloomberg.com/view/articles/2017-09-27/how-congress-governs-the-federal-reserve.


5

Obviously, it's not simply illegal to have a business that exchanges currency - legal currency exchanges do exist, after all. But you'd have to be careful if you wanted to open a business that does this. According to 31 CFR 1010.100, you are considered a "dealer in foreign exchange", and thus a "money services business", and thus a "financial institution", ...


5

My understanding is that the "flow-through" treatment is specifically a tax law concept. The LLC has its own income, which it can use to pay expenses or acquire assets or for whatever other purpose, and such assets become the property of the LLC. It's just that when it comes time to pay taxes, the LLC's net income is taxed as income to the owner. But that ...


4

If only the tip is left in such "fake" money, it would not be theft as there is no legal obligation to leave a tip at all (except in those establishments that add a tip or "service charge' to the bill.) If the "money" is not an attempt to imitate real cash, it wouldn't be counterfeiting (leaving monopoly money for example would not be counterfeiting). The ...


4

Here are the suggested federal jury instructions for aiding and abetting: To "aid and abet" means intentionally to help someone else commit a crime. To establish aiding and abetting, the government must prove beyond a reasonable doubt: First, that someone else committed the charged crime; and Second, that [defendant] consciously shared the ...


4

The part of the statute (which is part of an article of the Uniform Commercial Code model language applicable to the sale of goods) that you are discussing reads as follows: 1) A purchaser of goods acquires all title which his transferor had or had power to transfer except that a purchaser of a limited interest acquires rights only to the extent of ...


4

No They will list the price they are charging you. This will normally be greater than what they paid because that’s how business works. The amount they are allowed to charge is what you agreed in your contract with them (which may incorporate a price list) or, if the contract is silent, a reasonable amount. What is reasonable will be related to what the ...


4

It would probably be very easy for a third-year associate to find someone willing to pay him $250 to spend an hour fighting a traffic ticket. But if you're talking about a full-time job practicing law with a base salary equal to $250/hour, I'll go out on a limb and say the chances are literally zero. That rate works out to about $520,000 annually, and ...


3

could a case be made for breach of fiduciary duty? Yes, I think, although not every person or stakeholder would have standing to sue the board of trustees of the private university. The prima facie elements of breach of fiduciary duty are "(i) the existence of a fiduciary duty; (ii) a knowing breach of that duty; and (iii) damages resulting therefrom", ...


3

It would be unproductive to file a regular lawsuit for so small an amount, but you might want to consider small claims court, assuming that's available where you are. $600 should be well within the limit, and it's relatively inexpensive to file. You will have to show up on your assigned date or automatically lose, so make sure you can take any arbitrary ...


3

No, it is not debt and you are not owed any money beyond what Congress decides to give you. Section 1104 of the act says the benefits are what Congress decides to give out. This was challenged in 1960 and upheld. To quote Wikipedia: Ephram Nestor challenged Section 1104 after he was denied Social Security payments as a deported member of the Communist ...


3

The guy does not imitate his brother, but instead claims that money donated will be split with him -- however, his brother has no agreement/idea with this. That's called Fraud (Wikipedia), "...a deliberate deception to secure unfair or unlawful gain..." and will be recognized as such in almost every legal jurisdiction in the world. At very least, it's ...


3

I found a number of news stories and official documents about public schools with such policies including: "Parents face more fines and rules if their children miss too much school" from Public Opnion; "School Adopts Strict Policy on Parents Picking Up Children Late" from the Los Angeles Times; "If you're late to pick up your kid at school, expect more ...


3

The party that made the overpayment would have the right to sue you for "unjust enrichment" or "breach of contract" (since the terms of service no doubt provide or strongly imply that you are entitled to only one payment per sale), if you didn't voluntarily return the overpayment following a demand to do so, even though you received it through no fault of ...


2

There is no legal obligation to pay tips — pretty much like no laws oblige people to be civilized and nice. No law breaking — no basis for calling cops.


2

Since you don't say which country you're in, it's likely that you're interested in United States law. You are probably in the clear here, though you're getting close enough to the edge of breaking the law that I wouldn't be confident about not being prosecuted and/or convicted. The relevant laws in this case appear to be 18 USC 471, 18 USC 472, and perhaps ...


2

Note: I do not know the internal mechanics of Kickstarter (some comment states that it does not work as explained), so I will work on Rickstarter description by the OP. The funds are managed and held by Rickstarter but they are not owned by Rickstarter; it works as a scrow service. For each $1 of cash directed to funding a project Rickstarter accrues an ...


2

In the United States one would file a petition with the appropriate court to have a conservator appointed for the individual. I suspect that you are probably asking about U.K. law since you mention a "solicitor", although a few other countries also use that term. The process is essentially the same everywhere in the common law world, although the ...


2

The customer agreement requires you to have a valid form of payment, so deleting the card and closing the CC account would actually put you afoul of the agreement: it does not eliminate what you owe them. Unless you provide an alternative method of payment, or persuade them to waive the charges, their recourse for getting paid will be to sue you. Disputing ...


2

Based on another question you posted, I assume that your jurisdiction (still) is Florida. Is it legal for a restaurant to limit the amount of a certain type of bill? No, it is illegal. Here the subtlety is that --per your description-- server's bank constitutes debt (rather than payment for goods or services), and 31 USC § 5103 reads: "United ...


2

They can be ordered to pay a civil penalty, fined, or imprisoned. 52 USC 30116 (a) (1) (A): Except as provided in subsection (i) and section 30117 of this title, no person shall make contributions— to any candidate and his authorized political committees with respect to any election for Federal office which, in the aggregate, exceed $2,000; (The amount ...


2

You are placing too much importance on "flow-through". It does not even belong on the same list as the others. LLCs are defined by state governments. They decide what an LLC is, what features it gets, and whether it can hold property. ("yes"). When an LLC holds property, the title is held by the LLC. Period. The state gets to decide that. The IRS is ...


2

A reasonable person in John's position would know that dropping fragile objects of a roof is risky, and that padding is not an assured way to prevent damage. The trajectory could be off, so the plate just misses the pillows, say, or someone could accidentally bump and move them, or the padding might not be enough. As damage is a foreseeable consequence of ...


2

Article 1 Section 8 appears to answer your question - only the Federal Government has the power to regulate the value of currency. Unilaterally forbidding the use of pennies as currency would be a regulation of their value (from 1 cent to 0 cents). A state government might be allowed to refuse pennies for the purpose of paying for a service in advance like ...


1

Rickstarter certainly operates on accrual basis. So money landing in their "pocket" doesn't necessarily trigger a taxable event. When you deposit your paycheck in Wells Fargo Bank, Wells Fargo doesn't have to pay income tax on it because it's not their money. They don't own that money. Likewise, Rickstarter is nothing more than a bank for the money of ...


1

It's a well-known industrial fact that people are much less risk-averse with arbitrary tokens than they are with money. Even changing the representation of the exact some money from physical cash to a number in a bank account has this effect. There are likely other reasons or useful side effects to this practise, as alluded in another answer to your ...


1

Unfortunately, this is a title loan business.... Unfortunately, when you signed on the dotted line for the loan, you agreed to a contract and that payment structure. They are not doing anything without telling you; the way the loan and payments are outlined in the contract you signed. Best thing to do is Google for free legal help in your area and see if ...


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