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8

But lately he has had his friend use my PayPal account. Someone will send me money and then I transfer it to where he tells me. To cash app or venmo. That's money laundering. Definitely illegal. He said it's money owed for cellphones. People in jail aren't supposed to have cellphones. You are helping him break the law, which means you are helping him ...


7

The criminal complaint against Sarao can be found on the US Department of Justice's website. He was charged under four different sections of US Code: 18 USC 1343, which prohibits the use of inter-state or foreign telecommunications in the furtherance of a fraudulent scheme. 18 USC 1348, which prohibits fraud concerning securities and commodities markets. ...


7

I imagine it's not a crime to change your mind before the order goes through, but that's not really what this guy did. The allegation is instead that he never intended to follow through on those orders in the first place. Entering an order to sell stocks and then canceling those orders is a crime if its done with an intent to manipulate the market, which is ...


5

Obviously, it's not simply illegal to have a business that exchanges currency - legal currency exchanges do exist, after all. But you'd have to be careful if you wanted to open a business that does this. According to 31 CFR 1010.100, you are considered a "dealer in foreign exchange", and thus a "money services business", and thus a "financial institution", ...


5

It is unlikely that you could successfully sue the bank for breach of contract, but of course the first thing you should do is carefully read the agreement and see exactly what they promised. It is understandable that you would like to get your money right now, but that isn't necessarily guaranteed under the agreement. Assuming there is no statement in the ...


5

My understanding is that the "flow-through" treatment is specifically a tax law concept. The LLC has its own income, which it can use to pay expenses or acquire assets or for whatever other purpose, and such assets become the property of the LLC. It's just that when it comes time to pay taxes, the LLC's net income is taxed as income to the owner. But that ...


4

It would probably be very easy for a third-year associate to find someone willing to pay him $250 to spend an hour fighting a traffic ticket. But if you're talking about a full-time job practicing law with a base salary equal to $250/hour, I'll go out on a limb and say the chances are literally zero. That rate works out to about $520,000 annually, and ...


4

No They will list the price they are charging you. This will normally be greater than what they paid because that’s how business works. The amount they are allowed to charge is what you agreed in your contract with them (which may incorporate a price list) or, if the contract is silent, a reasonable amount. What is reasonable will be related to what the ...


3

Yes, and no You can't legally destroy banknotes but you can destroy coins. You can't "fraudulently" alter coins but that's not what you were doing; you were doing a science experiment, not committing fraud. The law prohibits the destruction of "bank bill, draft, note, or other evidence of debt": a coin is none of those things. The first three are obvious, ...


3

I found a number of news stories and official documents about public schools with such policies including: "Parents face more fines and rules if their children miss too much school" from Public Opnion; "School Adopts Strict Policy on Parents Picking Up Children Late" from the Los Angeles Times; "If you're late to pick up your kid at school, expect more ...


3

It would be unproductive to file a regular lawsuit for so small an amount, but you might want to consider small claims court, assuming that's available where you are. $600 should be well within the limit, and it's relatively inexpensive to file. You will have to show up on your assigned date or automatically lose, so make sure you can take any arbitrary ...


2

They can be ordered to pay a civil penalty, fined, or imprisoned. 52 USC 30116 (a) (1) (A): Except as provided in subsection (i) and section 30117 of this title, no person shall make contributions— to any candidate and his authorized political committees with respect to any election for Federal office which, in the aggregate, exceed $2,000; (The amount ...


2

Note: I do not know the internal mechanics of Kickstarter (some comment states that it does not work as explained), so I will work on Rickstarter description by the OP. The funds are managed and held by Rickstarter but they are not owned by Rickstarter; it works as a scrow service. For each $1 of cash directed to funding a project Rickstarter accrues an ...


2

You are placing too much importance on "flow-through". It does not even belong on the same list as the others. LLCs are defined by state governments. They decide what an LLC is, what features it gets, and whether it can hold property. ("yes"). When an LLC holds property, the title is held by the LLC. Period. The state gets to decide that. The IRS is ...


2

Article 1 Section 8 appears to answer your question - only the Federal Government has the power to regulate the value of currency. Unilaterally forbidding the use of pennies as currency would be a regulation of their value (from 1 cent to 0 cents). A state government might be allowed to refuse pennies for the purpose of paying for a service in advance like ...


2

A reasonable person in John's position would know that dropping fragile objects of a roof is risky, and that padding is not an assured way to prevent damage. The trajectory could be off, so the plate just misses the pillows, say, or someone could accidentally bump and move them, or the padding might not be enough. As damage is a foreseeable consequence of ...


2

The transaction you cite shows that the coins left what I presume is your wallet and went to another. You say that you "used" a payment processor, who will presumably convert the coins to Euros and pay your vendor. If so then the processor now has the coins. However it is your responsibility to get the payment to the vendor by following their instructions. ...


2

TL;DNR: It is currently illegal to melt down pennies and nickels in the US. US law (31 USC § 5111(d)(1)) gives the Secretary of the Treasury the power to "prohibit or limit...the melting of US coins when...necessary to protect the coinage of the US." In 2007, the Secretary (ie, the US Mint) used this power to issue a rule (31 CFR § 82.1(a) & (b)) ...


1

does the platform actually has the right to indefinitely hold the monies No. But they do not claim to have such a right though: the ordinary meaning of "suspend" is not "indefinitely hold". A reasonable person would expect the suspension to be temporary — pending any investigation / police inquiry as to whether the funds were actually fraudulent. Such an ...


1

Given that this transaction will not be otherwise found fraudulent/reversed, does the platform actually has the right to indefinitely hold the monies they have no ownership over? Indefinitely: yes; forever: no. Once the fraud investigation is completed the money would be released (if clean) or sent to the true owner (if fraudulent). If the contract is ...


1

I don't think this has been addressed, but: Contact a lawyer You shouldn't trust random people on the internet with this. You feel uncomfortable, and potentially participate in crimes. You should talk to a specialist, talk to a lawyer. That doesn't seem like a very complex problem, but you need a legal advice. There are some non-profits that help with ...


1

Your last paragraph asks for legal advice which is off topic here; you should talk to a lawyer. Having said that: You may not be able to prove you owned the BTC when they were only worth 250 USD, but how far back can you prove you owned them? If you can show you have held them for a while it strengthens your claim. Can you get your friend to testify about ...


1

IANAL and can't speak to Texas, but I have filled out insurance forms in California, which is also a Community Property state. CA case law is that life insurance where premiums are taken from Community money is Community Property. I believe TX follows the same rule. The husband's share can not be reduced below 50 percent without his permission. The insurance ...


1

This is a "how things are in practice" answer, not statutory. The ruling question is whether the virtual currencies are readily exchangeable for USD. For instance if there is a thriving, open currency exchange where I can convert 1000 World of Warcraft gold into 1 USD and back again anytime I please, then WoW gold takes on the character of a foreign ...


1

Rickstarter certainly operates on accrual basis. So money landing in their "pocket" doesn't necessarily trigger a taxable event. When you deposit your paycheck in Wells Fargo Bank, Wells Fargo doesn't have to pay income tax on it because it's not their money. They don't own that money. Likewise, Rickstarter is nothing more than a bank for the money of ...


1

It is common for large US corporate employers to have an employee donations program, often through United Way, sometimes organized by the company or through some other aggregator. Every such company that I have been involved with (at least 5 that I have worked for) had a prominent statement that all donations were voluntary and would have no effect on ...


1

Articles 66, 67 and 115 of the "General Taxes Law" of Spain demand you are able to prove those earnings' source, and legality, and that taxation has been performed for them; for 4 years (theoretically, in practice from 4 and a half to almost 5 and a half, depending on the month when they were earned). Otherwise, nothing else than that ohwilleke had already ...


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