16

There are two very important points you should keep in mind here: You are not under any obligation whatsoever to investigate the owner of a vehicle parked on your property. You have full rights to tow any unauthorized vehicle off of your property. So, by far the easiest thing for you to do is to shift all responsibility off of yourself. Make it somebody ...


5

let's look at the referenced Section 28085 ARTICLE 13. Theft Alarm System [28085- 28085.] ( Article 13 added by Stats. 1977, Ch. 993. ) 28085. Any motor vehicle may be equipped with a theft alarm system which flashes the lights of the vehicle, or sounds an audible signal, or both, and which operates as follows: (a) The system may flash any of ...


4

The reason an at fault driver is liable for damage in a collision is due to the tort of negligence. To be liable under negligence one of the many factors that the plaintiff (that's you in this case) must prove is that the damage you suffered was a reasonably foreseeable consequence of the defendant's (that's the U-turner) acts or omissions. This is where ...


4

Yes. This doesn't remotely approach the threshold to which the excessive fines clause applies. Also SR-22 insurance isn't a fine, it is a requirement that you take extra responsibility because you are a high risk driver. In general, states have broad authority to regulate the right to drive a car.


4

At least some two-plate states suggest that if you're registered in a two-plate state you must display both plates within their borders. And some even suggest you must have two plates even if your state only issues one, though this scenario would probably not withstand federal scrutiny. In Washington, License plates must be: (i) Attached conspicuously at ...


4

ECJ case C170/3 covers this (BPM on car imports to the Netherlands, when the car was not originally owned by the driver/importer) specifically. There are two requirements: You must own the car at the moment that you import it. Prior to import, you must have had a connection to the car. The first condition is logical; if your parents would still own the car ...


3

It wouldn’t Motor vehicle designs and modifications have to meet certain safety standards - so called “street legal”. These don’t. Play with them all you like on a private track but they won’t get on the road


3

I think this is a reference to Section 14-224: (a) Each operator of a motor vehicle who is knowingly involved in an accident which results in the death of any other person shall at once stop and render such assistance as may be needed and shall give such operator’s name, address and operator’s license number and registration number to any officer or ...


3

Yes But not because they are mandated, just because your car has one. Because there is one factory fitted and it is a piece of safety equipment anyone you pay to maintain your car would be negligent if they didn’t make sure it’s working.


3

A new car should be a new car, without any damage. But, if you did sign the contract after you saw the one scratch at night, the dealer may have needed to disclose in writing all of the damage (what you first saw and what you saw the next day) in writing before you signed. From NC Department of Justice - Disclosing New Car Damage • Dealers are required ...


3

Armed with the license plate info and VIN number (which can usually clearly be seen through the front windshield), it should be fairly easy to track down the last registered owner. But if the previous owner doesn't know about the vehicles being on his property (especially since he has lived there for quite a while and the cars are apparently newer in age (...


2

What you describe is covered by the concept of fraud, which is more serious. If a person knowingly makes a false representation of the car as having a particular kind of exhaust, which you rely on in accepting their offer, that is fraud: the "offense" occurs before the contract (it is what gets you to agree to the contract). A express warranty is part of the ...


2

The definition of 'Highway' in Virginia would indicate that these devices are not allowed on any roads, other than as necessary to cross them. "Highway" means the entire width between the boundary lines of every way or place open to the use of the public for purposes of vehicular travel in the Commonwealth, including the streets and alleys, and, for law-...


2

Not really. As a rule in the United States, in a rear end collision is cited to be at fault at the scene of the accident. Unless there was damage to either you or the SUV driver or the occupants of either vehicle, the matter will likely to go to court and the only purpose to assess who was wrong is for insurance to figure out. As the driver at fault, your ...


2

Why might this treaty be seen as an issue in Japan but not the US? In the U.S., when there is a conflict between a treaty and a statute enacted by Congress, the last enacted law controls. So, any U.S. law passed by Congress after 1949 could override the Geneva Convention of 1949 on this topic. I am not certain that Congress has passed such a law, but it ...


2

You have nothing to worry about. Your driver's license is only "connected" to your vehicle registration insofar as it is a valid form of identification proving your address in order to register your vehicle in many states. It is mainly used by states as a way of verifying that you actually live in that state. They generally don't want to register vehicles to ...


2

No. Your evidence of registration of the car would suffice to show that you are not receiving stolen property, although you are correct that not informing the police that it has been recovered could get you pulled over if the car has been reported as stolen. Given the circumstances of the question, I don't address the means by which the car is ...


2

My first thought was that you might be violating Michigan's seat belt law. However, the law actually appears to be fairly lax. For example, one section says: (5) Except as otherwise provided in subsection (3)(b), each operator of a motor vehicle transporting a child 4 years of age or older but less than 16 years of age in a motor vehicle shall secure ...


2

Riley v. California is the applicable law regarding cell phone searches, where the Supreme Court was pretty clear IMO. "The police generally may not, without a warrant, search digital information on a cell phone seized from an individual who has been arrested". There are narrow exceptions to the 4th Amendment warrant requirement. Searches ...


2

Unless corrected, where ever there is doubt as to what happened, I will presume innocence on the part of the suspect, unless that detail was not disclosed and meant to be included. Suspect is pulled over for speeding. He has no outstanding warrant for his arrest in any crime and is not currently serving time for a crime. This is legal. The suspect's cell ...


2

Your main concern is not actually the signature on the bill of sale, its getting your money back. The bit with the signature might be leverage, but you need to focus on the money first. If you complain to the DMV first there is a risk that ownership of the car will revert back to Mr B but you won't get your money back. It sounds like this was a very ...


2

California law Cal. Pen. 470 penalizes forgery, but also requires there to be an intent to defraud. Since this is a crime, you don't prove anything, you simply report it to the police and they decide whether it is worth pursuing. So ultimately, there would have to be good evidence of an intent to defraud in signing your name. The question that you would have ...


2

Yes, the police can give you a ticket for not having insurance/registration in the vehicle, even if they know it is registered/insured. The requirement is not just that you must have it, but you must carry proof of it in the vehicle. California Law (CVC §16058) requires that insurance companies electronically report insurance information to the DMV, which ...


2

Although the local mechanic was suggested by you he was paid by the dealer, and hence was acting as the dealer's agent in the repair. If the dealer did not want to accept this then they could have simply insisted on doing the repair themselves. The dealer is responsible for the actions of their agent, and they cannot run out the clock on the warranty simply ...


2

State law regulates the use of flashing and colored lights. Veh. Code 25250 says that "Flashing lights are prohibited on vehicles except as otherwise permitted", so if the state does not permit it, the county can't say anything about it. The list of permissions includes "making a turn", as a warning with parked on the side of the road, to warn of funeral ...


2

Rocks falling off a moving dump truck pose an interesting physics profile. As they bounce, they loose forward momentum, which is inefficiently converted to a higher bounce height. They can still be bouncing 500 feet behind a struck moving down the freeway. A defensive claim of tailgating (following too close) may be a deterrent, however it is well ...


2

Colorado statute 42-6-206 imposes disclosure requirements on the sale of vehicles with salvage titles. That you didn't know it was a salvage does not seem to be of concern to this particular statute. This means that you are potentially entitled to redress against the people who sold you the car as well, provided the sale occurred in Colorado and they ...


1

As a first step, locate and read all the documents you will be signing. I've never lived in Alabama, but in other states, I've had to sign the title, a separate mileage statement, and a bill of sale. At least one of these included a place to check a box indicating that The mileage written was correct The odometer was not operating correctly, or the odometer ...


1

The at fault driver is liable for the damage To avoid the complication that a written-off vehicle normally is not drivable and becomes the property of the insurer, let’s assume that it is legally parked in on the owner’s premises and an at fault driver strikes and destroys the mirror (or any other part) - they are liable for the damage done. The scrap value ...


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