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The short answer, is "it's complicated". I can think of situations where any of the above options you listed might be true. (Another possible option is "The baby has no nationality at birth", and would therefore be considered stateless, and would fall under the birth country's rules regarding statelessness). To find a definitive answer for your specific ...


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It depends on the law of each country involved. Each country X can decide its own laws, and if the baby is a citizen of country X (or something else than a citizen; for example a country could give you certain rights that are less than citizenship) according to the laws of country X, then the baby has those rights. Other countries can do the same. No country ...


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The Queen doesn't need legal rights, she is the law! As per Dale M's answer, Her Majesty doesn't meet the requirements to be a citizen of Australia under the Citizenship Act, nor has she ever been granted that status. Someone else will need to fill in the legal reasons as to whether or not a law like the Migration Act could be enforced against Her Majesty ...


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When the person has been naturalised, that is, when the US government officially recognises them as a US citizen. There are many pathways to citizenship and the ones on the linked page are pretty typical across the world although the details vary: residence for a period with or without marriage to a citizen service descent.


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Queen Elizabeth II is not a citizen of Australia, she is the Sovereign of it. The preamble of the Commonwealth of Australia Constitution Act also refers to enactment by the Queen, and thus Her Majesty transcends the personal-instutional level. I would still include her, as Queen of Australia, in the "Australian" category, yes.


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The Immigration and Nationality Act doesn't seem to give any way for a non-US-national to become a non-citizen US national. A non-US-national can only obtain US nationality by obtaining US citizenship at the same time -- via naturalization (whether automatic or through a process). The only ways to become a non-citizen US national seem to be 1) at birth, ...


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Queen Elizabeth II was born in London to British parents who were not permanent residents of Australia. She does not meet any criteria under the Citizenship Act for being or applying for Australian citizenship.


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There are a variety of sources of international human rights law, but very few of them are enforceable by individuals in a binding judicial forum. For example, the UN Declaration of Human Rights is not enforceable in the United States or most other signatories by individuals. Similarly, the decisions of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights are not ...


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It is up to each and every state to set the protection of their national symbols. But even if they do, enforcing this protection can be very complicated against non-citizens in foreign country. Basically, country like Kazakhstan can enact a law that prevents you from using their name, but if you do, there is nothing they can do to stop you.) There are some ...


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Note: The links will be French language as they were better than the English language sources I could find. However, see bottom for two English-language references. Historical Context In 1946, France was in the middle of restructuring after World War II. One of the major issues was its relationship with its colonies. Having been under Nazi occupation ...


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No. One cannot lose British citizenship simply for being absent from the UK. It's only possible to withdraw someone's British citizenship if their presence in Britain is found to be "not conducive to the public good," or if they obtained it by fraud. See https://www.thebureauinvestigates.com/2016/06/21/citizenship-stripping-new-figures-reveal-theresa-may-...


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No, each nation in the world is sovereign; that means the government of that nation decides what the law is for that nation. If that government decides to create a "council" which has statutory powers then the laws they make are binding within their jurisdiction only. If the council has no statutory power then it's just a group of guys getting together and ...


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