5

Yes. You can file a police report. You can also sue for cost of repairing any damaged property.


4

Do I have any recourse for invalidating all or part of the contract? No. There is a presumption in contract law that when a contract is reduced to writing then what that writing says is what the parties agreed. Also, if you signed it, then you are legally stating: I read it, I understand it and I agree to it - don't sign things you don't understand. If ...


3

Whether or not a lawsuit against the attorney is at all practical is a matter that only your other attorney can advise you on (after carefully studying the facts). The primary question is whether the attorney was negligent (there is also the question of whether there was significant damage resulting from the error). It is possible that the contract can be ...


3

Note: the example is distracting because it is so unrealistic. The surgeon does not put the patient under anesthesia, the anesthesiologist does. In a malpractice case, the plaintiff would have records which include what type of anesthesia was used, etc. In any case, your question seems to be about establishing negligence in a medical malpractice case. The ...


3

What’s the problem? Most likely the situation is 100% sure that he or she wouldn’t have performed the operation without anaesthesia. Therefore anaesthesia was not something his brain needed to remember, therefore it didn’t. He gave a truthful answer. He has no memory of it. He doesn’t need a memory of it, he just needed to make sure it’s done. Do you have ...


3

In common law jurisdictions like the United States, this would probably be controlled under normal tort principles, which would mean that the answer turns on the hacking victim's state of mind. If the victim is unaware of the virus or unaware of the hacker, she probably has no duty to the hacker, and therefore cannot be held liable for any injury he suffers ...


3

Criminal negligence pertains to criminal acts, which are prosecuted by the government and where a defendant can be convicted and punished. There will be a statute explaining where "criminal negligence" is relevant and when it is applicable. Here is the section in Washington law about criminal negligence: A person is criminally negligent or acts with ...


1

Yes for the damage to your property, maybe for almost shooting you. You could, of course, sue for the cost of repairing the damage caused to your property by your neighbor. Whether you could also sue for negligent infliction of emotional distress is a bit more complicated. The relevant test in many jurisdictions is the "zone of danger rule", which ...


1

It is a Class A misdemeanor, the penalty for which is up to 1 year imprisonment or 3 years probation, and a fine up to $1,000 or twice the gain from the crime. It might also be medical malpractice, depending on the standard of care owed to the person; more seriously, it would probably be fraud and false imprisonment. The comment somewhat clarifies the ...


1

Non-united-states answer In most parts of the world, the driver is at fault. For example, in new-south-wales, this is caught by s117 of the Road Transport Act 2013: (1) A person must not drive a motor vehicle on a road negligently. "Negligently" takes its common law meaning and the case law establishes that unless the pedestrian appears suddenly (such ...


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