88

It is legal, at least in the US, for a store (or other entity) to refuse to sell any item to any individual for any non-prohibited reason (prohibited reasons are typically things like race or religion). More over, in various US jurisdictions, it is prohibited to "furnish" alcohol to a "minor" (for example, under California's ABC law), which can be ...


45

You go into a store, pick up an item, go to the counter and you think you are legally entitled to own the item provided that you pay for it? Wrong. Wrong for any item, not just alcohol. Items that are on the shelves in stores are not offers in terms of contract law. They are invitations to treat/bargain. When you take an item to the counter it is you who ...


21

The answers here are already correct, but wanted to make a quick comment over this Even when I left the store to wait in the car they made him check out at a different register. It is of course completely silly that this is required, but from what I was told when I worked at a liquor store this was needed. The idea is by checking out at a different ...


16

Yes The directors of a company have a fiduciary duty to act within the law for the benefit of their shareholders - not to their customers, not to the government, not to the environment and not to the public. A lawsuit against the company will incur financial loss irrespective of if it is won or lost. It is difficult to see how it is in the shareholder's ...


13

Public Health Law PBH §12(1) says Any person who violates, disobeys or disregards any term or provision of this chapter or of any lawful notice, order or regulation pursuant thereto for which a civil penalty is not otherwise expressly prescribed by law, shall be liable to the people of the state for a civil penalty of not to exceed two thousand ...


9

Section 29-A of Article 2-B of the Executive section of the New York Consolidated Laws: ...The governor, by executive order, may issue any directive during a state disaster emergency declared in the following instances: ... epidemic, disease outbreak ... Any such directive must be necessary to cope with the disaster and may provide for procedures ...


6

In New York State it is not assault. Third degree assault (the least degree) is defined as: A person is guilty of assault in the third degree when: With intent to cause physical injury to another person, he causes such injury to such person or to a third person; or He recklessly causes physical injury to another person; or With criminal ...


4

In 1945? Not a chance. Basically, the only sexual crime that existed then was rape. In 2019? In New York, it appears the answer is still no. All sexual crimes require “sexual contact”: 3. “Sexual contact” means any touching of the sexual or other intimate parts of a person for the purpose of gratifying sexual desire of either party.  It includes the ...


4

There are no feasible legal actions that you can take. The implausible action is to sue the state on some constitutional grounds and have the order overturned in part. The order contains no appeals process, so you would have to attack the order itself. There are, here and there, lawsuits on Free Expression Clause grounds regarding the shuttering of churches, ...


4

If there is a contract, Bob is entitled to damages There probably is a contract in this case - the landlord (through their agent) has made an unambiguous offer which Bob has accepted by signing the lease. The contract comes into effect with Bob’s acceptance irrespective of if the landlord has (or ever does) sign it. If the agent has acted without the ...


4

I assume these are digital photos that were electronically transferred (not prints physically delivered). If they were prints physically delivered, he owns those prints, since you used to own them but you unconditionally transferred ownership to him by giving them. No backsies under the law. The photos are protected by copyright law, which means that the ...


3

The copies of the photo that you gave to him continue to be his. He is allowed to keep them, and there is probably no way that you could legally compel him to delete or destroy them. Unless the pictures can be classified as "hardcore pornography," they are within the ambit of First Amendment protection. I don't see -- and the article doesn't explain -- how ...


3

Yes. The formation of a labor union -- or virtually any other group -- is permitted by the First Amendment, which protects your right to associate with other people and your right "peaceably to assemble." As a group of volunteers, there would likely be meaningful barriers to its recognition for the purposes of enforcement of collective-bargaining laws. In ...


3

The statement "you don't need to put it in writing" is not an instruction, and should not be interpreted as on in lieu of other evidence (e.g. the follow-up question "you don't want to get fired, do you?"). It is, at best, a recognition that your concerns have already been noted (and at worst, a ham-handed threat). In the context of an at-will non-union ...


2

is it strictly legal to suggest or instruct employees not to put contract concerns in writing? Only on the surface, or by itself. The COO's direction has the appearance of lawful way of handling objections when negotiating generally any contract. However, in the employment context you describe, the COO's direction seems ultimately pursuant to conduct which ...


2

It seems that the statement slightly preceded the signing of the order. Executive order 202.14 (issued April 7th 2020) says: The enforcement of any violation of the foregoing directives on and after April 7, 2020, in addition to any other enforcement mechanism stated in any prior executive orders, shall be a violation punishable as a violation of ...


2

This will be jurisdiction-specific, because though most states do not construe general powers of attorney as authorizing further delegation of power (at least by default), the specifics will vary with the jurisdiction. In New York, N.Y. Gen. Oblig. Law § 5-1502A provides that a statutory short form power of attorney (even one which delegates full powers ...


2

Did Avi Yemini illegally record “Jim Jefferies” by using a hidden mobile phone? No. One- and two-party consent rules are about confidentiality of a conversation rather than an issue of whether either party gets to monopolize the recording(s) of their conversation. In this case, the conversation took place with both parties' awareness that the conversation ...


2

The Validity of State Wealth Taxes Yes. States can impose wealth taxes, although this doesn't clarify the validity of a federal wealth tax. States have broader taxing power than the federal government in terms of kinds of taxes that they may constitutionally impose. A state may impose any tax (1) that does not unduly discriminate against a federally ...


2

Misstating the truth is not perjury Perjury is deliberately lying under oath to gain a material advantage. For the situation you describe: You might be wrong and they actually do live where they say they do they might be wring and they genuinely think they live where they say they do, being wrong is not perjury it’s unlikely to administrate info in the ...


1

My understanding is that you do not get to pick a plan, but rather if laid off you are able to select the COBRA option for the insurance you have signed up for. Normally this will happen at a substantially higher rate, and it is time limited to 36 months. Costs are capped at 102% of the employer's current rate. You did not indicate what state you are in; ...


1

Yes. Breach of zoning regulations: running a business in a residential area Breach of internet providers terms of service: you need a business subscription Breach of fire code: is your "business" rated for an occupancy of 20? Breach of health code: Preparing food or beverages for sale without the proper certifications and a commercial kitchen Other ...


1

It's not just legal, but often (depending on the state/county) legally required, otherwise they would be considered 'negligent' in helping providing a minor with alcohol, which can get them in jail.


1

The Federal government could charge such a person with conspiracy to distribute, or with aiding and abetting distribution, or under a RICO (Racketeer-Influenced and Corrupt organization) case. Other federal charges might perhaps apply. The state of New York might possibly be able to pursue a conspiracy charge as well. In the current political climate, I ...


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