88

It is legal, at least in the US, for a store (or other entity) to refuse to sell any item to any individual for any non-prohibited reason (prohibited reasons are typically things like race or religion). More over, in various US jurisdictions, it is prohibited to "furnish" alcohol to a "minor" (for example, under California's ABC law), which can be ...


45

You go into a store, pick up an item, go to the counter and you think you are legally entitled to own the item provided that you pay for it? Wrong. Wrong for any item, not just alcohol. Items that are on the shelves in stores are not offers in terms of contract law. They are invitations to treat/bargain. When you take an item to the counter it is you who ...


32

No, Specific Ink Colors are not Required That is not correct. If the purple will not photocopy well, the other party might reasonably ask for a color that will. But a signature is normally only evidence of agreement to the provisions, and it is the agreement that is legally important. The color of the ink used does not change the agreement. It is normal to ...


20

The answers here are already correct, but wanted to make a quick comment over this Even when I left the store to wait in the car they made him check out at a different register. It is of course completely silly that this is required, but from what I was told when I worked at a liquor store this was needed. The idea is by checking out at a different ...


16

The statute reads (emphasis mine): A person is guilty of adultery when he engages in sexual intercourse with another person at a time when he has a living spouse, or the other person has a living spouse. Suppose Alvin has sex with Betty while Betty is married to Charlie. Does Alvin's conduct satisfy the elements of the crime? Alvin engaged in sexual ...


16

My best advice: purple ink is fine, unless they object, then find a color you both agree to. Everything past this point assumes an adverse relationship. Think about the dismal shape of things. A contract is a meeting of the minds. A contract-breaking dispute has arisen over the color of ink on the contract. Anti-purple is saying the contract is not ...


8

someone told me that writing in purple is not valid on legal documents. This is likely a misconception since most forms say use blue or black ink, but there is no law regulating a valid signature. In the US you can sign with an "X", a fingerprint, a yellow crayon if so inclined, a wax stamp, pencil, or even invisible ink* as long as it is meant to show ...


6

Looking at the text of the statute, it is clear that in that case your friend has satisfied the elements put forth. However, there are further issues. One is that courts generally requires crimes to have an element of mens rea, and none is explicitly given in this statute. A court may then infer one, treating the statute as reading "A person is guilty of ...


6

She can ask, but she does not have a right to be excused New York law for jurors does not have an automatic right to be excused because of familial care needs. There is a right to be excused for medical or financial hardship - which you might be able to argue here if, for example, you were at risk of losing your job. There is also a right for automatic ...


6

How should I proceed? I am asking law friends to recommend some employment lawyers, but other than this, can I do anything else? You definitely don't need an employment lawyer for this. From a legal standpoint, the matter is very simple: If you grant their request (whether by signing or otherwise expressing your acceptance), you would be waiving any ...


6

There is no time limit on performing a legal abortion. §2599-bb of the bill says that a physician may perform an abortion when, according to the practitioner's reasonable and good faith professional judgment based on the facts of the patient's case: the patient is within twenty-four weeks from the commencement of pregnancy, or there is an ...


5

In New York State it is not assault. Third degree assault (the least degree) is defined as: A person is guilty of assault in the third degree when: With intent to cause physical injury to another person, he causes such injury to such person or to a third person; or He recklessly causes physical injury to another person; or With criminal ...


4

If there is a contract, Bob is entitled to damages There probably is a contract in this case - the landlord (through their agent) has made an unambiguous offer which Bob has accepted by signing the lease. The contract comes into effect with Bob’s acceptance irrespective of if the landlord has (or ever does) sign it. If the agent has acted without the ...


3

The copies of the photo that you gave to him continue to be his. He is allowed to keep them, and there is probably no way that you could legally compel him to delete or destroy them. Unless the pictures can be classified as "hardcore pornography," they are within the ambit of First Amendment protection. I don't see -- and the article doesn't explain -- how ...


3

I assume these are digital photos that were electronically transferred (not prints physically delivered). If they were prints physically delivered, he owns those prints, since you used to own them but you unconditionally transferred ownership to him by giving them. No backsies under the law. The photos are protected by copyright law, which means that the ...


3

Clearly in this case the writing does not reflect your actual agreement. If you were to bill for 1.5x your normal rate for hours over 40/week, relying on the writing, and it came to court, you might win, based on the general rule that matters explicitly covered in the written agreement are treated as final, and evidence of contradictory oral agreements are ...


2

In this case the Plaintiff, James Maloney, has previously been charged with a crime for possession of nunchucks. He is apparently suing to enjoin further enforcement of the law under which he was previously charged. US Federal courts will only take up a "case or controversy", which means an issue where actual, not theoretical rights are at stake, and in ...


2

First of all, Sally can't charge Bob, or anyone else. She can file a complaint with the police, or with the District Attorney. It may or may not be investigated, and if it is, charges may or may not be brought, and she has no control over any of that, although she may be able to use persuasion or political pressure to influence the decision. In New York, ...


2

This article is a New York State directed guide to the problem. The most important question is, exactly what has the neighbor done to cause the flooding. If this flooding is a natural consequence of the land, the neighbor is not liable. If he has altered the land, he may still not be held responsible. New York follows a form of the "common-enemy" rule, which ...


2

Your example is from 2.4(b)(1) of the style manual for "Commission and Agency Documents and Materials". The New York Public Employment Relations Board is a state level version of the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) that governs private sector management-union relations nationwide, for public employees in New York State. These boards have both ...


2

Yes, you can sue for wage theft, and assuming the facts are as in the question, should have a good case. You will definitely need a lawyer, and I cannot recommend one, nor should anyone on this site. This page from the NY State bar association offers a referral service. This page from lawhelpny.org offers referrals to both free and paid services. this page ...


2

Collecting a DNA sample is required by law. People v. Husband 954 N.Y.S.2d 856, elaborated on what that means. The law says [a]ny designated offender ... shall be required to provide a sample appropriate for DNA testing to determine identification characteristics specific to such person and to be included in [the] state DNA identification index. ...


1

It's not just legal, but often (depending on the state/county) legally required, otherwise they would be considered 'negligent' in helping providing a minor with alcohol, which can get them in jail.


1

The Federal government could charge such a person with conspiracy to distribute, or with aiding and abetting distribution, or under a RICO (Racketeer-Influenced and Corrupt organization) case. Other federal charges might perhaps apply. The state of New York might possibly be able to pursue a conspiracy charge as well. In the current political climate, I ...


1

New York's new law makes clear that abortion is legal in the state under three circumstances: The abortion occurs before the end of the 24th week of the pregnancy. The abortion is "necessary to protect the patient's life or health." There is an absence of "fetal viability," or the ability for the fetus to survive outside the womb. ...


1

Contracts, as a general rule, don`t even have to be written to be valid. But, some have to be because a law very often exists requiring this. The color ink used is normally irrelevant to its validity, unless the contract states otherwise or a statute (law). Courts usually have local rules requiring signatures on all documents be in either blue or black ink, ...


1

The ‘clean hands’ doctrine only applies to equitable remedies, not remedies at law. Breaking confidence is, in this case, breach of an implied term of a contract. It is also a tort and this might be argued as well. Both of these are legal, not equitable, remedies. When you bring an action at law rather than at equity your hands can be as filthy as you like. ...


1

The contract itself does not present much of a danger, but the fact that they messed this up repeatedly does raise the question of whether they will mess other things up. For instance, when they fill out your 1099/W2 form, will they do so based on your actual income, or based on the 1.5x rate?


1

The owner is generally subject to premise liability, and they have a duty to keep non-trespassers safe. They also have a duty to not negligently make conditions worse, which leads to confusion over whether you should plow or not plow. The answer is, you should plow successfully, not negligently. In both cases, the guiding consideration is negligence (both ...


1

It seems you have learned a lesson in making sure you keep your paperwork in order. That said I can't imagine a reasonable judge coming back and saying that because you lack the landlord's written permission to sublet, the subleter is now allowed to squat in the landlord's space. That would be an absurd result. Obviously this is no guarantee as judges are ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible