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73

A "land contract" is not a way of renting property, it is a way of purchasing property on an installment basis without bank financing. It is Ohio's version of what in some other places is known as "contract for deed". See "What is a Land Contract in Ohio" and "How Land Contracts Work" The actual law is Section 5313. In a land contract, the buyer has ...


45

There is a state law that requires you to obey the police: ORC 2917.13, which says you may not Fail to obey the lawful order of any law enforcement officer engaged in the law enforcement officer's duties at the scene of or in connection with a fire, accident, disaster, riot, or emergency of any kind. If you do, misconduct at an emergency is a ...


24

This is buying a house. If that's not what you mean to do, watch out! Even so, watch out. Honestly, if it hadn't occurred to you until now to buy a house, this isn't for you. If this has piqued your interest in buying a house, explore doing it the normal way with bank mortgage, realtor, all that. Land contracts are often thought of as "exploitive", ...


15

Typically the landlord will have a preexisting clause in the lease that says the landlord may choose to amend the lease at a later date. While that may be in contracts, I don't see that holding up in court. You can't unilaterally amend contracts to add new terms without acceptance on part of the lessee. Any clause in the contract like that will require ...


15

I'm speculating a bit, but it is sometimes hard to distinguish a 'request' from an 'order' when dealing with law enforcement. Police might say "Can you open this door for us please?". But this can mean either "we would like you to open this door for us if you don't mind" or "we are ordering you to open this door, but in a polite way". I wold perhaps ...


4

It is almost totally legal. Federal law prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, disability, and familial status, and Ohio law (ORC 4112) does extends the prohibition to ancestry and military status. So if the reason is "she's (not) a soldier", it's illegal, otherwise it is legal.


4

Typically - in fact - in almost all cases - there are no posted, regulatory speed limits for on- and off- ramps. This article proved interesting. Specifically, Those ramp speed signs, black numerals on a yellow field, are advisory only. They have no force of law. The only regulatory speed signs are the black-on-white speed limits posted on the roadway ...


3

Normally, an employer can decide whether someone is allowed to go on leave or not. If someone has a covered disability, that must be accommodated, except to the extent that the disability makes the person unable to perform a bona fide job qualification that cannot be accommodated by any practical means. Employers have some latitude and discretion in ...


3

It is not necessarily a crime to do this, but the gift to you and from you to Betty would be disregarded and treated as if gift directly from Alice to Betty, if the IRS knew all of the facts. A gift implies a donative intent directed at you. When there is an understanding that you are acting at Alice's direction, you aren't receiving a gift, you are acting ...


3

In the USA, you must be found guilty "beyond reasonable doubt". As you describe it, I'd say there is an unreasonable suspicion of guilt, not guilt beyond reasonable doubt. If the magician killed three people that way, then three unexplainable deaths following three spells might get him convicted. A jury might say that even though there is no way to explain ...


3

Wife was an RA at a women's college. I'm seeing this from two perspectives... 1) the police / fire are just human beings like you and me. They're not infallable. There may be a single set of keys, and the person responding might not have them. But, if the officer or fire personel are responding to an emergency, then they do need access. Facilitating their ...


2

The terms of the lease are subject to Ohio's law. The only option for a tenant terminating a rental agreement is ORC 5321.07(B)(3), in response to failure to fulfill obligations under 5321.04. Those obligations relate to safety and health, keeping things in good working order, not abusing access and privacy rights. There is no obligation to make the tenant ...


2

The relevant law for you is ORC 4705.07. (A) No person who is not licensed to practice law in this state shall do any of the following: (1) Hold that person out in any manner as an attorney at law; (2) Represent that person orally or in writing, directly or indirectly, as being authorized to practice law; (3) Commit any act that is ...


2

The assailant had committed a crime. The waiter (or anyone else) could have arrested them and detained them until they could be transferred to lawful custody (police). Reasonable force is allowed.


2

In 50/50 custody you have the right to stand your ground to ensure the safety and well being of your children. You do not need to involve police unless it is an emergency. "911 Operator, what is the emergency". Only call them when you feel your children are in grave danger. For example, you know for sure that the other parent is drunk and driving, or the ...


2

There are procedural rules in place in the state universities pertaining to any negative action, but the exact rules depend on the nature of the position. Faculty for example have one set of rules, students another, and staff yet others. A hearing is thus required to do anything significant (such as fire an employee), so it is very common. The function of a "...


2

A few key points: The only way you can recover anything is with a lawsuit or the threat of a lawsuit. There are special procedural and substantive hurdles involved in suing a governmental entity which is a specialized area of tort law that varies significantly from state to state. It is likely that there is liability under a governmental waiver of the ...


2

This is outside the scope of landlord-tenant law and the obligation of the landlord to make the premise habitable. Building codes are not imposed retroactively on existing housing, so while it is true that you cannot legally build a house without service grounding, you do not have to install service grounding when that becomes part of the electrical code (...


2

The legal limits on what you can be charged as rent in housing (apart from government housing) is whatever the lease says: there is no rent control in Ohio. If the lease says $1500/mo, you would owe that until the end of the lease. If you don't leave at the end, you have a holdover tenancy, so again it depends on what the lease says. If it says that you may ...


2

First, it is monumentally unfair (probably unconscionable) to require mediation before seeking injunctive relief. An injunction is sought and granted when there is ongoing and immediate harm by the act or omission that cannot be remedied by damages and requiring people to go through a mediation process is definitely unreasonable and probably unconscionable. ...


2

A court could order the breaching party to stop breaching and to pay an amount equal to the economic injury caused by the breach.


2

No. People buy cars for other people all the time. The dealership has no obligation to figure out why your boyfriend was willing to accept a loan obligation for a car he did not own. That said, this situation sounds about as shady as it can be. If your boyfriend entered into a different relationship with the bank than he intended to, something went badly ...


2

It would depend on what the local ordinances' history is. If it was legal when the house was built, then it's likely grandfathered unless you try to modify that wall. If the local laws don't have a grandfather clause, or it was always illegal, you can ask the owners to check with the local inspections office to get a variance as mentioned in RonBeyer's ...


2

No, you can not. It is your choice to cut the grass, not the city's.


1

Non-refundable application fees are non-refundable, and they are legal in Ohio. Here is a state-by-state summary: there is no limit on how much they can charge. Here is a small article on Ohio law that says this.


1

Older U.S. dryer and range plugs were three-prong: two hots and a combined neutral/ground, the neutral being connected to the chassis within the dryer. If you're getting chassis shocks, either the dryer has a problem (as user6726 says) or the receptacle's neutral has become disconnected somewhere in the wiring. The latter would be a significant wiring ...


1

The Ohio State Bar agrees with the state employee that you can go to court. The statute in question seems to be 3119.79; that statute provides that a court recalculates upon request (there are other sections for other kinds of review, but 3119.79 is the "any time, for significant changes" one). The actual order doesn't need to be changed unless the ...


1

If your concern is just that they're marking up your driveway without your permission, it probably doesn't matter whether it's "graffiti" as much as it matters whether it's illegal. I can't find a record of any prosecution for the use of sidewalk chalk, but the behavior sounds like it fits within the description of criminal mischief (R.C. 2909.07): No ...


1

With respect of Graffiti, this generally fall under vandalism, and with respect of Ohio law, chalk is unlikely to qualify under Ohio Revised Code Title XXIX. Crimes Procedure as there is unlikely to be any lasting damage. Depending on what is being written, you might be able to do something about it under disorderly conduct laws.


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