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74

A "land contract" is not a way of renting property, it is a way of purchasing property on an installment basis without bank financing. It is Ohio's version of what in some other places is known as "contract for deed". See "What is a Land Contract in Ohio" and "How Land Contracts Work" The actual law is Section 5313. In a land contract, the buyer has ...


45

There is a state law that requires you to obey the police: ORC 2917.13, which says you may not Fail to obey the lawful order of any law enforcement officer engaged in the law enforcement officer's duties at the scene of or in connection with a fire, accident, disaster, riot, or emergency of any kind. If you do, misconduct at an emergency is a ...


24

This is buying a house. If that's not what you mean to do, watch out! Even so, watch out. Honestly, if it hadn't occurred to you until now to buy a house, this isn't for you. If this has piqued your interest in buying a house, explore doing it the normal way with bank mortgage, realtor, all that. Land contracts are often thought of as "exploitive", ...


15

Typically the landlord will have a preexisting clause in the lease that says the landlord may choose to amend the lease at a later date. While that may be in contracts, I don't see that holding up in court. You can't unilaterally amend contracts to add new terms without acceptance on part of the lessee. Any clause in the contract like that will require ...


15

I'm speculating a bit, but it is sometimes hard to distinguish a 'request' from an 'order' when dealing with law enforcement. Police might say "Can you open this door for us please?". But this can mean either "we would like you to open this door for us if you don't mind" or "we are ordering you to open this door, but in a polite way". I wold perhaps ...


3

Wife was an RA at a women's college. I'm seeing this from two perspectives... 1) the police / fire are just human beings like you and me. They're not infallable. There may be a single set of keys, and the person responding might not have them. But, if the officer or fire personel are responding to an emergency, then they do need access. Facilitating their ...


3

Normally, an employer can decide whether someone is allowed to go on leave or not. If someone has a covered disability, that must be accommodated, except to the extent that the disability makes the person unable to perform a bona fide job qualification that cannot be accommodated by any practical means. Employers have some latitude and discretion in ...


2

It would depend on what the local ordinances' history is. If it was legal when the house was built, then it's likely grandfathered unless you try to modify that wall. If the local laws don't have a grandfather clause, or it was always illegal, you can ask the owners to check with the local inspections office to get a variance as mentioned in RonBeyer's ...


2

This is outside the scope of landlord-tenant law and the obligation of the landlord to make the premise habitable. Building codes are not imposed retroactively on existing housing, so while it is true that you cannot legally build a house without service grounding, you do not have to install service grounding when that becomes part of the electrical code (...


2

No, you can not. It is your choice to cut the grass, not the city's.


1

I would check your local and state laws regarding rendering aid (often referred to as Good Samaritan Laws). Usually, when acting in good faith in the assistance of a person who is reasonably believed to be ind distress, you cannot be punished for damages in the course of rendering aid (Often called Life over Limb policy, the hypothetical situation is that ...


1

This site on Ohio landlord/tenant law says: Ohio’s landlord/tenant code does not include detailed rules when it comes to rental terms, but it does require that a landlord must include certain terms in the lease agreement. A tenant legally agrees to follow these rules when she signs the lease agreement. ... The lease should state when rent is due and ...


1

Non-refundable application fees are non-refundable, and they are legal in Ohio. Here is a state-by-state summary: there is no limit on how much they can charge. Here is a small article on Ohio law that says this.


1

Older U.S. dryer and range plugs were three-prong: two hots and a combined neutral/ground, the neutral being connected to the chassis within the dryer. If you're getting chassis shocks, either the dryer has a problem (as user6726 says) or the receptacle's neutral has become disconnected somewhere in the wiring. The latter would be a significant wiring ...


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