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In general, "a signed piece of paper" is not "a contract". It may be a record of a contract, but the contract itself is the meeting of minds where an agreement is reached and doesn't depend on the existence of the piece of paper. (Depending on the jurisdiction, some sorts of contract are required to be in writing, but this doesn't usually apply to ...


3

As @Martin Bonner has already answered, a "signed piece of paper" would merely be an evidentiary record of any contract into which you have already entered. Should you ever need to prove the terms that have been agreed, such a document would be useful—but is not strictly necessary. Whether clear enough terms (for a contract to exist) have actually been ...


3

You've asked a two part question. [Is this a violation of] the international policy that a country should never refuse entry to verified citizens of their own? In considering that question, the US example may be illuminative. The US requires US citizens to have a "passport book" when flying into the US, even though the US issues "passport cards" that ...


3

In writing, the prime objective is clarity This is particularly true of legal writing because large consequences can hang on their interpretation including loss of liberty or life. Overly verbose writing is generally not clear, however, overly concise writing isn’t necessarily clearer. For example, the Reddit clause you quote explains that location data is ...


2

It is not illegal to copy a driver's license (assuming that is what you mean by "license"), and this is done reasonably frequently, when A needs proof of identity from B and needs to retain that proof for some bureaucratic reason. In certain contexts (probably most contexts), a copied license would be useless: for example, TSA will not accept one. However, I ...


1

Option one does two things although it is subtle. It means that if there is a dispute about classification of a right for bankruptcy purposes that the divorce court and not the bankruptcy court should resolve it. It allows the divorce court to change the alimony award in the future. Option two leaves classification to a bankruptcy court without going back ...


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