43

The green card should always be at hand Yeah, he can't do that. He needs a green card in his possession anytime he's not on private property. Obviously for instance leaving it in the gym locker while you're at the gym is ok, but no, you can't dash off to the grocery store without it, on the logic that it's "just in town". Just like I can't make a milk run ...


38

It might be sufficient to have a lawyer draft a letter asking for the return of the documents; many people become much more reasonable after seeing something in writing that spells out what laws they are breaking and what the likely consequences are. Filing a police report may become necessary, but might not be the best way to ensure that the documents are ...


35

A necessary first step in such a situation is filing a police report in the town where the withholding/theft occurred (or is suspected to have occurred.) Generally, a complainant can do this by visiting a police station and being interviewed by an officer. Once the report is taken, a few possible outcomes might occur: The police visit the person suspected ...


17

Yes. A domestic passport is sufficient photo ID for any purpose (other than driving or establishing state residency) and is expressly authorized as sufficient ID for employment on a form I-9 and for banking "know your customer" rules. Indeed, for some purposes, even an expired passport is sufficient ID as it establishes citizenship.


13

Stop asking around on internet now. Your uncle needs to talk to his daughter and get his Green Card (this should be possible seeing how she is is daughter?!). If that doesn't work right away, police must be involved without much delay, but your uncle should first consult an immigration lawyer because there are several traps he can step on. A Green card can ...


5

There is a legal requirement for US citizens to have a US passport when entering and leaving the US, though there are some exceptions. (The exceptions mostly concern other kinds of documents that are acceptable when traveling by land or sea to Canada, Mexico, or the Caribbean.) The law is 8 USC 1185(b): (b) Citizens Except as otherwise provided by ...


5

Nope. 18 U.S. Code § 1028 - Fraud and related activity in connection with identification documents, authentication features, and information (a) Whoever, in a circumstance described in subsection (c) of this section— (1) knowingly and without lawful authority produces an identification document, authentication feature, or a false identification document; [.....


5

You got an entry stamp, not a visa stamp. A US visa (aka "visa stamp") is a physical sticker that you have to go to a US consulate to apply for, which takes up one page of your passport and says "US Visa" on it. Canadian citizens do not need or get US visas to travel to the US for most types of nonimmigrant statuses, including as a visitor. US citizens are ...


4

It depends on what you are using it for. AFAIK, there is no law specifying that a passport must be valid for every single potential requirement of photo ID. For example, until 2010, you could not use a passport for purchasing alcohol in California, because it does not have a physical description.


4

It depends on the issuing country. The primary purpose of a passport is to enable the holder to travel internationally, not to prove citizenship. Most countries only issue passports to their citizens, which has made such passports widely recognised as proof of citizenship — both inside and outside of the issuing country. But at the end of the day it is up ...


4

I assume that since your wife entered on a K-1 visa, that you are a U.S. citizen. This makes a difference because the time limit is different in each case. Spouses of U.S. citizens can apply for naturalization once they have been lawful permanent residents and married to their spouses for three years: The spouse of a ​U.S.​ citizen who resides in the ​...


4

You have the right to withhold this information; they have the right to withhold a passport. You do not have a right to a passport; it is a privilege and that privilege may be withdrawn at the discretion of the State Department for all sorts of reasons. As a US citizen you have a right to travel within the US; you don't need any papers for this. However, ...


3

australia There is no limitation on the number of names you can have so long as it is at least 1. You cannot have a prohibited name (NSW Births Deaths and Marriages Registration Act 1995, other states are similar): "prohibited name" means a name that-- (a) is obscene or offensive, or (b) could not practicably be established by repute or usage-- (...


3

Is something considered stolen if it possibly could have been lost? Something is considered stolen if it was stolen. You don't have your passport + Someone entered the room where it was ≠ They stole it Can this be brought to small claims court? What damage did you suffer that could be remedied by a monetary settlement? Sure, the landlord entering ...


3

The picture shown is not fraudulent or problematic. Fraud involves using a false representation (or concealing a fact) in order to obtain a result that would not have been possible to secure without the misstatement or concealment. No one is using the photograph of the exterior of a passport (which is identical for all U.S. passports) to obtain any ...


3

What should and shouldn't happen isn't going to do a damn thing about your passport situation. Your passport isn't being 'held', it's in processing at a place that is currently not operational due to an unprecedented virus outbreak. No one is acting like a criminal or treating you like one, you are just unlucky. If your situation is that dire, you have no ...


3

There's an answer at Irish Citizens Information, complete with a chart. First, it doesn't matter if the Irish ancestor was living in the Republic or in Northern Ireland. However, the ancestral right only extends to grandchildren unless you were born after 2015. Otherwise, your parent must have claimed Irish citizenship before you were born.


2

It is almost certainly illegal. I was unable to find UK provisions but the penalties for stealing an Australian passport are 10 years imprisonment or a fine of up to 1,000 penalty units (at time of writing a penalty unit was $170 so, $170,000) (Section 32(4) of the Australian Passports Act 2005). Under this law, the crime is knowingly having it in your ...


2

Works created by the U.S. federal government, such as the passport cover design, are ineligible for copyright within the United States. If the passport design was created by the U.S. federal government (and not a third party who later transferred ownership to the government), then the passport design is in the U.S. public domain and may be photographed, ...


2

There is no risk to getting an Irish passport. If at some point in the future they did decide to introduce conscription or tried to apply taxes to you (extremely unlikely) you could simply destroy it and renounce any Irish citizenship. The law on this subject is well developed due to the open Irish border and many people who already have dual citizenship. ...


2

One crime is obstruction of correspondence, 18 USC 1702, Whoever takes any letter, postal card, or package out of any post office or any authorized depository for mail matter, or from any letter or mail carrier, or which has been in any post office or authorized depository, or in the custody of any letter or mail carrier, before it has been ...


2

Probably No. To the extent that the airline is enforcing immigrations laws, it is likely doing so at the direction of a government official or government regulations, or sometimes as an actual agent of the government. Essentially, in the first instance, the airline would have an illegality defense to a claim for breach of contract. An airline can't be ...


2

The question is not if the airline is wrong, the question is if they are negligent If the airline has a reasonable belief that the trip is unlawful then they are within their legal obligations to stop Bob boarding. In arriving at their belief, providing they acted within the law and their own policies and made reasonable enquires within the time constraints, ...


2

The constitution of India doesn't explicitly talk about the freedom to enter India, it does however grant freedom of movement inside India with some reasonable restrictions (it is ironically not clearly defined as to what may be reasonable). Now it may be argued that for someone to be able to exercise their rights to this freedom, they must be allowed to ...


1

Your wife wants Swedish citizenship with female gender. Having "female gender" will be much much more important than having the same gender in two passports. Most countries want to see one passport. They will check one passport, and only one passport, and check if there is anything suspicious or unusual about the passport. There's nothing unusual about ...


1

I don't like the family name appearing in my passport and will likely change it in a bureaucratic procedure in an interior ministry affiliated consulate (outside the borders of the state of which I hold citizenship) or in a population bureau branch (inside the borders of the state of which I hold citizenship) sometime in the future. Almost all ...


1

Yes. See the State Department's page on passports for children under 16. If both parents are unable to appear A third party may apply for the child's passport with a notarized statement from both parents/guardians giving that third party permission to apply for the child. The statement must include a photocopy of the parents/guardians' identification. No....


1

This answer will different from country to country - however what is looked for is generally government / state issued ID (or a government recognised substitute). Passports must be close to a gold standard for 1 form of ID because they are government issued and need to meet certain internationally agreed criteria to be useable. Another common solution is ...


1

In the United States there is no general law on the topic. Depending on the reason why you need to identify the person, and the role of the person examining the identifying credential, they may have a limited list of credential types they may consider or they may be forbidden from asking the person for certain credentials. See, for example, the California ...


1

There is almost certainly not a uniform international rule of law on this question. Burden of proof is an issue of civil procedure and not all countries place the same burden of proof on the same person for every single issue. The applicable law would also depend upon how the issue presented itself. In a criminal case, the law of the country where the ...


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