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1

Making a pledge not to sue doesn't create any liabilities for you other than the liability that you cannot sue. Giving someone a license could lead to trouble, for example if a third party turns up with claims that they are the owner of the patent, and they obviously want damages, including payments for the licenses that you gave away. Same situation with ...


1

An inventor is someone who makes a conceptual contribution to something claimed. Provisional applications are not required to have claims so at the time of filing the concept of who is and is not an inventor may not be accurately known. The charitable explanation is that whatever your contributions was it was deemed not a conceptual contribution to ...


0

You ever wonder why there are so many Open Source Licenses? Because licenses come with terms. Terms on usage, applicability, copy-left, copy-right, retention of IP, how you can/can't use it, warranty and liability, etc. Licenses are complicated, and the transfer of liability isn't always clear, which is a big concern for companies. Now, instead they say "we ...


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I believe they did this to not really be bound. They can retract the "pledge" unilaterally since there is no contract with anyone. Also, if you sue them for infringement you might find the pledge does not apply to you any longer. If they wanted to, it is easy to file papers with the USPTO, etc. disclaiming a patent. from the Tesla document - A party is "...


4

There's a few good reasons that spring to mind. Firstly, it's possible that Tesla or Microsoft have been themselves licensed something where the license is not sub-licenseable. This would prevent them from subsequently licensing you, but a promise/pledge is not a license and they can go right ahead and make promises. Secondly, a license is broadly an ...


2

Ideas cannot be protected by either patents or copyright. If you have a great idea for a game, and I hear of it, I can use that great idea myself. What you want to do if you hire a software developer: Before you hire them, you don't tell anything about your idea that could let them copy it. If you have to tell them, then you make them sign an NDA (a Non ...


3

Games can be protected by patent. You get some protection through copyright, but only on things like artwork and the precise text of the rules; someone could copy the ideas of the game with different artwork and not violate your copyright. You would need a patent in each country you want to protect it in. In general patents are expensive and complicated. ...


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