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Until and unless a patent is issued, the inventor has no exclusive rights. Assuming a patent is granted, the issued claims will be what defines infringement. What you do before the patent is issued is not infringement since there is nothing to infringe. However, if there is a finding of infringement in the U.S. for activity after a patent is issued, the ...


-1

Depends on the laws in Country B. Different countries have different laws, and in some countries, it might be legal to patent other people's inventions from other countries. While First World/developed countries would likely try to prevent this, some Third World/developing countries have a much more permissive attitude towards patent law, and may well turn a ...


0

No Only true inventors can apply for a patent. If it was not patented in country A or anywhere, a random person who is not the inventor still can't patent it anywhere. In practice, of course someone could lie on the oath and be granted a patent.


8

No Because it’s patented in country A, it is not novel anywhere in the world. That is, the patent in country A is “prior art” that would disqualify it from being patented anywhere else. The original patent holder can patent it elsewhere because patent law has an exception for that.


2

As mentioned in a comment, a non-provisional application you file within a year of the provisional application that gets the benefit of the provisional is not at all constrained by the content of the provisional. However, for a claim in the non-provisional to actually get the benefit of the filing date of the provisional, the provisional needs to fully ...


1

Ideas are not Intellectual Property Literary and artistic works are (copyright is automatic) and inventions can be (if patented). Ideas are neither. The only way to protect an idea is to keep it secret. If someone learns of your idea and turns it into a novel (copyright) or an actual machine for preventing button batteries from being swallowed by toddlers (...


0

Copyright protects specific expressions of ideas, not the ideas/inventions themselves - that is what patents are for. If you put an invention in the public domain by publishing how to make and use your invention you can not then put strings on that invention. If you want people to be able to use it only if they credit you then you first need to own it - then ...


1

Creative Commons licenses grant more or less limited permission to use works protected by copyright, the details demanding on the particular license selected. They can only grant or restrict permissions to the extent that copyright law permits. Ideas are not subject to copyright protection. If others learn an idea of yours, they are free to use it, including ...


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