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66

at what point can you just leave? Is it always technically illegal in the UK to leave without paying the bill? Probably depends on what you mean with just leaving. If just leaving translates I haven't paid and I won't pay (because of the hassle with the card) then that's probably Making Off Without Payment, section 3 Theft Act 1978 (Thanks @bdsl).  ...


36

There is little prospect for suing over this measure. The university has a legitimate interest in verifying that access to online systems is only granted to authorized users, and simple passwords are considered to be insufficient. (I don't intend to argue about password technology, I'm just making the observation that two-factor authentication is better than ...


36

It is illegal for you to take a meal and intend to not pay. You have a reasonable expectation of using a credit card if they normally take it, The situation of finding out the machine is down isn't, by itself, intent to not pay. So if they call the police, and while you're still in the restaurant, accuse you of refusing to pay -- the police certainly will ...


17

If I fill my car with diesel and suddenly realise I've left my wallet at home, the attendant will take a note of my car registration, which will be all over cctv anyway, along with my face. I'll promise to come back and pay within a reasonable amount of time that is agreed. If I fail to honour the agreement they will call the police and report it as theft. ...


16

They can’t hold you there for any period of time, as that would be false imprisonment. You have a legal obligation to pay the bill; however, there is no contract about when your payment is due. You can leave at any time without paying, so long as you have the intention to pay. You can leave your contact details so there is proof of your intent to pay later.


15

Typically the landlord will have a preexisting clause in the lease that says the landlord may choose to amend the lease at a later date. While that may be in contracts, I don't see that holding up in court. You can't unilaterally amend contracts to add new terms without acceptance on part of the lessee. Any clause in the contract like that will require ...


5

Employees are only required to work in the sense that refusal to report can result in discipline (like reprimand or firing) and forfeit of whatever money you would have earned had you shown up. This is exactly the same way federal employees (or most employees, for that matter) are always required to work. The fact that they're not being paid on time has ...


5

You owe money if there is a contract obliging you to pay. Whether you receive what you pay for (e.g. services) only affects your stance when suing for non-performance/damages; your obligation to pay still stands until the court decides it does not (or there is a mutual agreement to discharge the contract). It is irrelevant whether the original payment ...


5

I'm pretty sure any judge is going to give them broad leeway to the business to self-determine the manner in which they secure their electronic systems. Where your argument disintegrates (or coalesces) is what may be blindsiding you: There's more than one way to pay a bill. Or there ought to be. The court system is an entity that runs on paper. And ...


5

In practice this is rarely done in the US. There have been cases of employment contracts with automatic increases tied to the CPI (Consumer Price Index) or some other measure of inflation -- I believe at one time a number of union contracts specified this. Employer and employee could certainly agree on any such formula. But in the absence of any explicit ...


5

Walking away without paying comes under three possible criminal acts: The Theft Act 1968: defines crimes related to "dishonestly appropriating property belonging to another with intention to permanently deprive the other of it’". ("Appropriating" basically means treating the objects as if one was the owner, so taking it to keep or to sell, etc). This is the ...


4

As a graduate student at a UC school, you are a private customer of business run on behalf of the State of California. Given private contract law and the general framework in the USA and California, I think they can require that customers pay bills by using two factor authentication as there are not any laws that explicitly forbid it. In general, to sue ...


3

If this is a client - contractor relationship, it depends on the contract. Attorneys may bill on a quarter-hour basis, or a 10th-hour basis. A 1 minute phone call under a quarter hour billing basis is more expensive than under a 10th-hour basis, all other things being equal (i.e. the hourly rare). So if I hire an attorney to do something and he bills me for ...


3

In Texas, as in most of the US, the law is "Employment at Will". This means that an employer is free to fire people at any time, for any reason, or none, as long as it is not for one of the few reason forbidden by law, such as racial or age discrimination. Hourly employees are entitled to overtime pay in such cases, but "exempt" employees are not. Nor are ...


3

The party that made the overpayment would have the right to sue you for "unjust enrichment" or "breach of contract" (since the terms of service no doubt provide or strongly imply that you are entitled to only one payment per sale), if you didn't voluntarily return the overpayment following a demand to do so, even though you received it through no fault of ...


2

Note: IANAL Does the placement of a sticker stating, "We accept XYZ credit cards," essentially obligate a business to accept that card? It depends on whether you mean whether they are obligated to provide goods/services to someone who presents the card, or whether, having provided goods/services, they are obligated to accept the card as payment. For ...


2

This is a breach of contract, and not a fraud, unless you can prove that they had no intent of refunding your money when they told you it was refundable, which would cost thousands of dollars to do, even if you could manage to prove it. As a practical matter, however, the cost of obtaining relief in time and money may exceed the $92 you could recover. Even ...


2

This is likely a simple case of someone giving them your email address by mistake, instead of their own. In any case, if you didn't make the booking you owe them nothing. You should respond to the email, stating that you didn't make the booking and that you believe they have a case of mistaken identity. Suggest that they send the SMS message, as it is ...


2

They can terminate the "Project" (presumably defined elsewhere) if the client blah, blah, blah, however, they must still pay you for the work you did prior to them terminating the Project (if, in fact, they have terminated it - they have the right but they still have to exercise it). Hire a lawyer.


2

Is It Too Late To Collect The Bill? Probably not. There is a statute of limitations for collecting unpaid medical bills that varies in length in different jurisdictions, and the age of the bill in the question is approximate, so it is hard to know for sure if this one is too old. The relevant statutes of limitations in most U.S. states would be at least ...


2

Federal and Texas Law: Texas' laws with respect to overtime pay adhere strictly to the federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). Employees who work more than 40 hours per week are entitled to either 1.5 hours of comp time per extra hour work or 1.5 hours worth of pay per extra hour worked. According to this source, though, the comp provisions are for ...


2

Disclaimer: I don't know the specific regulations of New Jersey, so this mostly describes the general practise in the United States. However, it seems the rules are roughly similar in all states. During a divorce proceeding the court ordered the father to pay 1xxx a month in child support through the court/state supervision arrangement. This is ...


2

A payment plan is not a contract. You could have a contract where you promise to do something that you don't already have to do, but you can't have a contract obligating you to pay (you already have that obligation). Instead, you seem to have negotiated a modification on the terms of the existing contract: they may have agreed to allow you to pay in a new ...


2

A periodic tenancy, a tenancy-at-will and a month-to-month tenancy are all different names for the same arrangement - a tenancy without a defined end date. Which term is used depends on the custom in each jurisdiction. Very specifically, a periodic tenancy follows on from a fixed term tenancy while a tenancy-at-will is created at the outset, however, there ...


2

See Curbside Pickup | Spokane County, WA: Residents who live in areas without access to these service providers can self-haul waste and recyclables to any of three transfer stations in the County. So it would appear that there may be a county law that requires you to use a garbage service if you are within one of the service areas. I couldn't track ...


2

There are two possible ways this arrangement would work: The business’ terms of payment were 60 days and now the are Cash on Delivery. As each transaction is a seperate contract, they can set the terms on each however they like. You have credit contract with the business independent of the substantive transactions. These are common in B2B relationships but ...


2

There are two parts to your question: Is it legal to do this? and Can they make me?. I see no reason in the Employment Standards Act 2000 why it's illegal for a workday to be split in two. Section 18 specifies that you are entitled to at least 11 hours between the end of one day and the start of the next, but you are well within that. It is conceivable that ...


2

Under federal law, an employer may impose direct deposit as a condition of employment. The Electronic Funds Transfer Act at 15 USC 1693k only says that employers may not require an employee to have a bank account at a particular bank: No person may— (1) condition the extension of credit to a consumer on such consumer’s repayment by means of ...


2

It's unlikely that you can legally force an employer to give you a physical pay check. Hence you should explore how you can attain your goal with negotiations or workarounds. Since it's not entirely clear what you specific objection is, we can only speculate. Here are some ideas. Most businesses prefer direct deposits because it's faster, cheaper, safer and ...


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