9

What are the reasons/ legal requirements that the police might need my personal information, given that I had not been able to provide any further information/ witness testimony to the incident that they were investigating? The police in england-and-wales have a duty to undertake reasonable lines of enquiry and to carry out a proportionate investigation in ...


7

I suspect that US voting records would fall under Article 2(2)(a): Article 2 Material Scope ... This Regulation does not apply to the processing of personal data: (a) in the course of an activity which falls outside the scope of Union law; I doubt it would be possible to argue successfully that a foreign election is anything other than "an activity ...


4

Art 13 GDPR is about information to be provided when data is collected directly from the data subject. This information can be provided directly during/before collection. It is not generally necessary or useful to send the data subject an email with this information. Usually, a SaaS website will provide the information under Art 13 as part of their privacy ...


3

There are multiple issues with what you are trying to do, including issues with copyright, personality rights, and data protection. You are trying to use other people's content and likeness for your advertisement. Unless you are certain that you can do this in your relevant jurisdictions, without their consent, this sounds like a very bad idea. At least ...


3

Yes. It is legal for them to do so. Also, they are often required, by their insurers and lawyers, if not as a matter of law, to maintain them for seven years in most cases, so that the information is available if a lawsuit arises from any of their dealings with you (e.g. if they receive notice of a lawsuit involving a Zipcar you were allegedly using or had ...


3

What can Mr. Johnson be charged with? In england-and-wales this would be an offence colloquially referred to as revenge porn contrary to s.33 of the Criminal Justice and Courts Act 2015 (1) It is an offence for a person to disclose a private sexual photograph or film if the disclosure is made — (a) without the consent of an individual who appears in the ...


3

No, The SaaS company should strive to be a Data Processor for the web agency, and the web agency will likely want to be a Data Processor for its customers in turn. A Data Processor processes the personal data only as instructed by the Controller. The SaaS company should not be a Data Controller itself. Being a Data Processor requires a contract that fulfils ...


2

In most US states, information on one's own voter information, including registration details and voting record, is available from the state without any need to invoke the GDPR, for any registered voter. For example, in Maryland one can visit this web page to request from the state Board of Elections one's voter registration record, and various other ...


2

This is a very interesting question about the territorial scope of the GDPR. As previously discussed on this site and as supported by Art 3(2) GDPR and EPDB guidelines 3/2018, the GDPR only applies to non-EU data controllers for processing activities relating to the offering of goods or services to data subjects in the EU. Here, the controller offered ...


2

Applicable Law There are (at least) two levels of regulation involved. At the state level, all fifty states and all or almost all U.S. districts and territories have enacted laws requiring notifications of data breaches. Under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, publicly held companies also have to make regular reports to the public via the Securities and ...


2

Indeed, the examples given by the European Commission all involve directly identifying data. It seems that the lists of examples should not be considered exhaustive or authoritative, but that they should be considered as examples of “definitely personal data” and “definitely not personal data”, thus painting a bright line between the two. Other kinds of ...


2

The GDPR is not intended to only regulate commercial processing of personal data, but is aiming for comprehensive data protection. This does also cover non-profit and political activity. The exception for “purely personal or household activities” has to be interpreted somewhat narrowly. It does not apply to all personal activities, but to purely personal ...


1

would the GDPR apply? Your publication(s) would be GDPR compliant even if done by a company or someone with non-personal interests. That is because: politicians' status renders their views on various issues a matter of public interest (see articles 6.1.e and 9.2.g); the circumstances under which politicians state their views oftentimes constitute one or ...


1

When you collect or process personal data, you must provide information to data subjects. The required information is listed in Art 13 GDPR, though most privacy notice also include the items from Art 14 GDPR (if there are third party data sources) and Art 15 GDPR (which simplifies responses to data subject access requests). The ICO has provided detailed ...


1

GDPR does allow the processing of personal data, provided there is a permission of the data subject and/or a justification by law. Personal data needs appropriate safeguards and deletion policies. You might want to get specific legal advice for the country you're in. I'd ponder briefly if dietary preference constitutes either medical or religious affilation ...


1

Information about devices in a network is traffic data within the meaning of the EU ePrivacy Directive. Such traffic data can only be used under limited circumstances, in particular if the data has been anonymized or if the user has given consent. Traffic data can also be used for billing purposes. E.g. the ISP might have a billing model where the access ...


1

The title and the contents of your question are totally different. The title is "will they disclose my information", which is likely the most relevant thing for you. The contents is "are they obliged to disclose my information". What actually will happen: The company will ask itself three questions: 1. Will we be in trouble if we provide ...


1

The Eleventh Amendment to the US Constitution has been interpreted (by the Supreme Court) as conferring a significant degree of sovereign immunity on the states. US courts will generally not award money damages or injunctive relief against US states unless they have waived immunity by state law. By itself, this already takes most of the teeth out of GDPR, ...


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