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24

You signed a contract where you agree to not have pets and the landlord agreed to let you live there. If you decide to not follow your end of the deal, the landlord might not either. In simple terms, you can get evicted. There is probably a clause in the contract to the effect of "you will get evicted if you don't follow these rules". Depending on contract ...


17

Not all discrimination is illegal. For instance, landlords discriminate against those who can't afford to pay the rent. They might discriminate against former tenants who destroyed several walls during their lease period. They discriminate against those with bad credit, and often might discriminate against the unemployed. Landlords often do discriminate ...


13

The legal repercussion is that you could be evicted for breach of contract. The courts would not order you to give away the cat. What you should do, rather than waiting for this to melt down to a court case where you would not like the outcome, is instead to negotiate an accommodation with the landlord. You want something, so don't expect to get it for free. ...


8

Can a landlord legally charge for pet rent even when no pets are present in the apartment? Yes. Absent any indication in the lease that your cats would not move in immediately, the landlord is right. I assume that your lease reflects mutual knowledge of your intent to bring your cats over (via a marked checkbox or in "d) Pet1 Details: ... Pet 2 Details .....


7

In the U.S. it is legal to "discriminate" against tenants for any reason not explicitly forbidden by law. Your question contains good examples of why a property owner would legitimately want to discriminate. HUD enforces federal anti-discrimination law. Presently: Federal law prohibits housing discrimination based on your race, color, national origin,...


6

In Fiji, The Dogs Act 1971 section 9 states: The owner of every dog shall be liable in damages for any unprovoked injury done by his dog and it shall not be necessary for the party seeking damages to show a previous mischievous propensity in such dog or the owner's knowledge of such mischievous propensity or that the injury was attributed to ...


5

You are responsible It is unlikely that the arrangement you had with the sitter amounts to a contract. Even though there was consideration on both sides, at first blush it seems unlikely that both of you intended to create legal relations. See What is a contract and what is required for them to be valid? Notwithstanding, if there is a contract it is silent ...


4

At least in Austria and Germany, banning cats in rented apartments is quite a complex issue. See here. Generally banning them seems not to be possible, as they usually don't bother other tenants and you can easily restore your apartment when leaving, should the cat damage it. possible repercussions? Well, don't expect any goodwill on other matters from ...


4

According to this press release, Toronto is "stepping up enforcement" of its leash by-law. You should call 311 to report violations: http://www.toronto.ca/311/knowledgebase/29/101000050429.html You can find more information here: http://www.toronto.ca/311/knowledgebase/47/101000050447.html http://www1.toronto.ca/wps/portal/contentonly?vgnextoid=...


3

A property owner has the legal right to set the rules for their property, which can include a no-pets policy. This includes property owned by the government, by government agencies, and government-funded operations. The service animal exception is the accommodation for disability that is required under the ADA and analogous state laws. So if you take your ...


3

If it says "no pets" in the leasehold, then yes, that is enforceable. It doesn't have to be reasonable (in your opinion, or objectively) to be enforceable. Your choices are to either negotiate different leasehold terms, or to find a different leasehold.


3

No, you are not breaking any laws. There is a law about fouling but that's about excrement. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dogs_(Fouling_of_Land)_Act_1996


3

USA: 19 USC §1308 prohibits the import, export, or interstate sale of cat or dog fur: (1) In general It shall be unlawful for any person to— (A) import into, or export from, the United States any dog or cat fur product; or (B) introduce into interstate commerce, manufacture for introduction into interstate commerce, sell, trade, or ...


2

There sort of is a law, this one. It does not absolutely forbid owning a possum, but it is required that you have a license to take or keep a wild fur-bearing animal including a possum. There is no existing "license to take and possess as a pet", but you could try under trapping licenses. However, they warn that the Fur-bearing Propagation Permit does not ...


2

No. The quality of care for chattel is that the animal is not starving, it is not being subjected to cruelty or pain. Not getting a "haircut" is perhaps inexplicably not on that list of egregious grievances.


2

Subject to the provisions of the lease and the law, a tenant is entitled to "quiet enjoyment" of the premises which basically means that the landlord can't tell you what to do with your leasehold and can't bother you while you enjoy it. If the lease is silent about animals then the only thing preventing you having a menagerie are the laws where you live (...


2

The ultimate legal liability for the damage is probably theirs, although the jurisdiction where this happened would impact the result in principle. Your car insurance may or may not cover third party damage to your car, depending upon what your insurance policy says, probably with a deductible. But, your car insurance would have a right to subrogation ...


2

Legal answer A blanket "no pets" clause is unenforceable, and would remove even the requirement for you to ask before keeping pets (ref:landlordlawblog). This is why the clause contract has the phrase "the Landlord’s consent [...] will not be unreasonably withheld". You shouldn't take this phrasing to mean that the landlord is happy for pets given certain ...


1

Petitions and the like are outside the scope of this site. But the first step, which is in the scope of this site, is to know what law you want to change. This is likely going to depend on the animal and the state, and possibly local laws as well. For example, Wisconsin law makes it illegal to possess a "wild animal" under most circumstances without a ...


1

We all want the rats to be removed from our house, is there anything we can do about it? From a purely legal point of view, probably not. While the pet owner is clearly violating her rental contract (assuming it forbids pets), the rental contract is between her and the flat owner. That means only the owner can enforce the terms. If they choose to ignore ...


1

There is probably not a law in Utah that prohibits the use of cleaning chemicals that are harmful to dogs without advanced notice. This would be particularly true if the landlord generally prohibits pets but your emotional support animal is an exception to that general rule. If you let your landlord know that the chemicals are harmful to your dog and that ...


1

This will depend on the jurisdiction. In the United Kingdom, I think more information is needed. In Fardon v Harcourt-Rivington, Lord Atkin made it clear that [Failing to control dogs] is a liability which exist only in the case either of wild animal, which have by their nature a mischievous propensity, or of tame animals which are known to the persons ...


1

The Shz article is outdated but doesn't state that you may not let your dog run free in Schleswig-Holstein. It merely outlines the specific legal situations when it is not allowed to let your dog run free. So, the generic legal rule is that you don't need to keep your dog on a leash until there is a legal provision requiring you to do so. There was a ...


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