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1

Police can lie However, in the United States they have to read you your Miranda warning (most other democratic countries have similar warnings): You have the right to remain silent. Anything you say can be used against you in court. You have the right to talk to a lawyer for advice before we ask you any questions. You have the right to have a lawyer with ...


8

Call the non-emergency line of the Red Hook Police Department and explain the situation and ask for a welfare check: 732-530-2700. Police | Red Bank Borough, NJ. To report elder abuse, take a look at Department of Human Services | Adult Protective Services (APS) and then contact the Monmouth County division: Family and Children Services of Monmouth County ...


-2

Actually, it is State to State, not all states require it... States such as Massachusetts require it


4

The Evidence Would be Admissible. Under the so-called "good faith exception" to the exclusionary rule the evidence would probably be admitted over Bob's objections in both cases mentioned in the question. Recent US court decisions have limited the exclusionary rule when police officers reasonably but mistakenly believe that a valid warrant exists, and find ...


3

The answer by @Digital fire is not always correct. Some states have passed general-purpose "duty to rescue" statutes. The one I've been trained about is Vermont's (Cite as: 12 V.S.A. § 519) § 519. Emergency medical care (a) A person who knows that another is exposed to grave physical harm shall, to the extent that the same can be rendered ...


1

This will vary from state to state as some states have "Duty to act/rescue" laws. Generally, There is no duty to assist anyone during a medical emergency or accident. In some states like Florida, There is a statue called the "Good Samaritan Act" which will grant immunity to anyone trying to offer assistance in good faith. The person rendering the aid must ...


-2

In theory, this should not be a problem. However, in practice, the TSA can probably find a reason to make you stop recording. If you start recording before your phone is x-rayed, and refuse to stop recording, this counts as interfering with screening. If you are recording when you demand a pat down, and try to record through the pat down, then you likely ...


2

Yes If you are fleeing, and an officer (let's assume lawfully) orders you to "stop" and you keep fleeing then you clearly have not stopped. Thus, you have disobeyed the order. The only instance I can think of where this might be an argument for a courtroom is where an officer orders "don't start running" while you are already obviously running. I ...


0

In order to legally force you to produce an ID. Police need reasonable articulable suspicion. But, since cops are allowed to lie to you. They try to make things up to try and get you to product an ID if you have not been suspected of committing a crime. At that point if you willingly producing an ID, it was on your own accord. They can even threaten you with ...


1

Background From the Iowa Municipal Code: Sec. 70-39. - Loitering near government buildings. (a) No person shall congregate, stand, loaf or loiter in or in front of or around any school or other public building occupied in whole or in part by any governmental subdivision, including any agency, body, department, office, board or commission and the like ...


4

The district court judge, as reported in this news story has held that there was probable cause to arrest Daniel Robbins in this case, and that his rights were not violated. If this ruling stands, officers acted legally, although they might still be required to return the phone with the images. Whether there is probable cause for an arrest (or a search) is ...


5

In New York State it is not assault. Third degree assault (the least degree) is defined as: A person is guilty of assault in the third degree when: With intent to cause physical injury to another person, he causes such injury to such person or to a third person; or He recklessly causes physical injury to another person; or With criminal ...


0

Yes From the new-south-wales Criminal Trial Bench Book (or Judging for Dummies): An assault is any act — and not a mere omission to act — by which a person intentionally — or recklessly — causes another to apprehend immediate and unlawful violence: R v Burstow; R v Ireland [1998] 1 AC 147. Thus it is the fear which is the gist of assault. Battery is ...


0

This is a deescalation tactic. By giving some ridiculous far out reason, the officer hopes to distract you from any combative or aggressive feelings you have about being stopped. You can do this too, if someone you think is getting progressively angrier might try and hurt you, bringing up something random forces their mind off their anger, even just for a ...


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