New answers tagged

0

I don't know about 4511.71, "driving on a closed road" (it's probably inapplicable because that only applies to construction closures), but what you describe is, at a minimum, a violation of: 4511.25, lanes of travel: (A) Upon all roadways of sufficient width, a vehicle or trackless trolley shall be driven upon the right half of the roadway, ...


4

"I have done nothing wrong" You got up in court and, when the judge asked if you had done anything wrong, you said: "yes" (guilty). So, in the eyes of the law, you are in the wrong. Police are entitled to make mistakes and, when they do, the accused can either accept the consequences of that mistake by pleading guilty and paying the ...


-2

I do not think you did anything wrong - other than if you are going to go to court you should plead "NOT GUILTY." But the real wrong was committed by that officer who wrote you a ticket.


20

The policeman ordered, right as he took a step out of his car "Turn it off!" - which is a lawful demand to prevent the biker from possibly kicking the gas and running. As the driver did not seem to comply (from the policeman's PoV) during his walk over to the bike, he enforced the order himself by turning off the bike and confiscating the key for ...


5

It's illegal if the intent is to deceive. Under S50(1) of the Police Act 1996: Any person who with intent to deceive impersonates a member of a police force or special constable, or makes any statement or does any act calculated falsely to suggest that he is such a member or constable, shall be guilty of an offence and liable on summary conviction to ...


0

Under Section 5(2) of the Regulation of Railways Act 1889, revenue officers are empowered to detain you in specific circumstances until you can be brought before the courts or, more normally, handed off to the police for arrest and subsequent prosecution in the normal way. These specific circumstances are: You do not present a valid ticket demonstrating you'...


2

TfL Revenue Inspectors can't arrest you - but under certain circumstances they can detain you or use reasonable force to remove you from the 'railway' (which includes TfL buses in London, yes it's weird). Specifically where you either fail to pay the fare or give your name and address when asked. Section 5 of the Regulation of Railways Act (1889) is the ...


3

Employers in CO and at least 43 US states cannot lawfully fire an employee for reporting a crime to the police, or calling 911. It falls under the public policy exception to at-will employment. Some examples or this are covered here. https://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2001/01/art1full.pdf Two examples of statutory text, but most will fall under case law. ...


4

There's no legal requirement in Canada or US that the police do anything to investigate a crime, so there's no requirement that they do anything specific to investigate a crime. If the police officers are satisfied by the witness accounts, or have some reason to think viewing surveillance recording wouldn't be useful they don't have to, either by law or ...


4

The mere presence of a weapon is probably not, on its own, justification to shoot the possessor. Ultimately, the actions will be judged under the totality of the circumstances related to the shooting. I want to be as neutral as possible here in sharing the information that has thus far come to light but nowhere has "the presence of a melee weapon" ...


4

You are asking a different question The title to the earlier question -- "Do the police have a civil duty to do their job" -- is slightly misleading. The question is not whether the policy have an abstract "civil" duty to enforce the law, but whether they have a specific "constitutional" duty to do so. If they do have such a ...


Top 50 recent answers are included