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This feels like a political hit job carried out by the courts rather than the wheels of justice doing their thing. The wheels of justice are doing their thing; the answer and legal reasoning is in the court transcript, as quoted and commented on by a news source: see Michael Cohen raid and first day in court. Transcript: 04/16/2018. The Rachel Maddow Show | ...


4

Very briefly, holding political views or having political party affiliations simply do not give a person inclusion in a protected group (Wikipedia) when it comes to federal law. Protected classes do include • Race – Civil Rights Act of 1964 • Religion – Civil Rights Act of 1964 • National origin – Civil Rights Act of 1964 • Age (40 and ...


4

This is pretty solid fair use territory. The court will consider how much you copied and whether you needed to, but I don't think they'd think you crossed the line with these facts. Even if they did, that's just one of four factors, and the others generally work in your favor. For a similar case in a New Hampshire governor's race, check out Keep Thomson ...


4

Don't even think of going there. If you refuse to pay taxes with this argument, the IRS will take this as a "frivolous tax return", and give you a fine of up to $5,000. If you are trying to argue that this is illegal, you only make things worse. The IRS gets about 20,000 to 30,000 frivolous tax returns every year, so every argument you could come up with ...


3

It is generally legal in the US for the government to investigate a person for committing crimes, and to prosecute them if there is sufficient evidence that they committed a crime. The criminal indictment, returned by a grand jury in US District Court, Eastern District of Virginia, can be seen here. This alleges conspiracy to violation of 18 USC 371, 1030(a)(...


3

No - at least not in South Carolina, depending on your intent. SECTION 7-25-200. Unlawful inducement to file for or withdraw from candidacy for election. (A) It is unlawful to offer or accept, or attempt to offer or accept, either directly or indirectly, money, a loan of money, or any other thing of value which includes, but is not limited to, ...


3

You've already found an answer to the question about theft in the linked answer, that since they do not take the goods, nor even intend to take them away permanently there can be no consideration for theft here. There may be a case of criminal damage though, reading up on CPS website brings up some interesting points, notably: Damage is not defined by ...


3

The short answer is that we have a First Amendment right to know what's going on in the courts. That generally includes a right to know any information that a judge uses to make her decisions. In this case, Cohen's records have been seized, and he's trying to assert that some of them are from legal clients and some are from business clients. The judge ...


3

This is less of a legal question and more of a moral one. I'll just say that, in the Bible, when asked a somewhat similar question, Jesus said, "Render to Caesar the things that are Caesar's, and to God the things that are God's." This did not mean Jesus condoned everything the Roman government was doing. Quite the opposite. But it does illustrate an ...


2

First of all, the words, the images, the layout, and the totality of the original mailer are all protected by copyright. You may not reproduce any of them without permission, unless fair use, or another defense, applies. Making comments on a published work is the classic reason for fair use. It is exactly what is meant by a "transformative use". The reader ...


2

In the US and UK, public prosecutors have "prosecutorial discretion," which means that they have mostly sole discretion of which alleged crimes they choose to prosecute. In the UK, the Crown Prosecution Service does have a set of guidelines on their prosecutors must follow when making the decision to prosecute, summarized as (emphasis mine): Is there ...


2

First of all, in the US, or more exactly, in many US states, Gender and sexual orientation are protected categories, while political belief is usually not. Moreover, gender at least is something that a person cannot change, and many people now believe that the same is true of sexual orientation as it is of "race", ethnicity, national origin, and similar ...


1

There are no UK laws explicitly against political persecution and I don't know which laws one could use in relation to it. One can seek asylum in an EU or UN member state (including the UK) on the basis of being persecuted for one's political opinion. According to the BBC, Assange's asylum claim in the Ecuadorian embassy was granted by Ecuador's government ...


1

tl;dr There's likely a case to be made for either conversion or trespass to a chattel. And the UK also passed the Torts (Interference with Goods) Act in 1977. Because the link above is a little light on detail, I've added a US-based answer that tries to flesh it out somewhat. Much of the relevant tort law below derives from common law, so hopefully it's ...


1

UK-based answer: Trademark is a type of protection that prevents others from selling products similar to yours with your trademark. So if a political party had a business selling T-shirts, sure it could trademark its name for the purposes of a clothes brand, and have protection there. But could it trademark its name to prevent other political parties to ...


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