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I thought I would add my experience as an answer now that I've spoken to the right people and been back to collect the wedding certificate. Within the EU there is a certificate that adopts the "international model" which means it comes in around 10 different languages. We asked the registry office in Portugal if our certificate could come in that form. As ...


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To quote Wikipedia: In theory anyone who is at least 16 and resident in the United Kingdom can call themselves whatever they wish. In practice, however, some form of documentary evidence is required when changing your name on bank accounts, passport, etc: Documentary evidence of a change of name can be in a number of forms, such as a marriage ...


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There's a good recent decision by the European Court of Human Rights (BĂRBULESCU v. ROMANIA). This case, although not entirelly related to your question, sheds some light over it. In summary decided in favor of the employer with regard to the possibility of monitoring private messages from the employee. The reason I say this case might be of good help is ...


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Immigration is up to the individual EU member states. A work visa is only valid in that country. While you might have been able to work for a Portuguese employer remotely from France, your French visa did not authorize you to take up work in Portugal. The EU/EEA does have a concept of “freedom of movement”, meaning that an EU citizen has the right to work in ...


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The maximum sentence for any offense in Portugal is 25 years under Article 41 of the Penal Code of Portugal (PCC). Article 152 of the PCC provides that domestic violence is punishable by up to 5 years in prison. Articles 163-174 of the PCC set forth penalties for a variety of sex offenses (incidentally, "rapto" is a false friend in Portuguese which ...


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The potential sentences are set forth in the Penal Code of Portugal at Articles 153 to 162. The statute for each offense sets forth a maximum penalty. The most serious offense of this type is punishable by up to 16 years in prison. There is not always a minimum penalty and sentencing alternatives earlier in the Penal Code undermine the minimum sentences set ...


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Crimes are prosecuted either where they were committed, or where the harm was intentionally caused, or both.[1] The statute of limitations that applies is the statute of limitations in the country where the crime is prosecuted. Other statutes of limitations for crimes are irrelevant. Generally speaking, if a crime is still prosecutable in the place where it ...


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Your disclaimer is unlikely to carry much value. If the law says you are right, the disclaimer doesn't help. If the law says you're wrong, the disclaimer doesn't help either. The correct disclaimer probably would have been along the lines "Any opinion publicised is the opinion of its author, and may or may not reflect the opinion of the ThisSite.pt." At ...


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Yes, they remain valid However, the vast majority of contracts allow the innocent party to terminate them if the other party commits an 'insolvency event' like appointing an administrator. This is typically an active step that the innocent party must take; it doesn't automatically flow from the insolvency event. In addition, a company in administration is ...


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The current law does suggest so. The law does not actually contrast "nationality" and "citizenship" as the translation suggests: it says that the grandparent "não tenha perdido essa nacionalidade" (has not his his/her nationality). The part that would remain to be determined is whether both grandparents lost their Portuguese nationality somehow. The most ...


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I had to do this recently to get married as my mother had reverted to her maiden name as did I when I was 9... all my docs were new surname but birth records where different. You have to apply for a deed poll UK Deed Poll change and fill out the documents. It didn't take that long to do. However I was getting married outside the UK so I had to get my new ...


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