82

Yes, it's illegal You are missing something terribly important: The package might not be your property [yet]. In any way, it is not in your possession, while it is in the hands of the postal service! The contents of the package started fully owned by the sender and were entrusted to the postal service to deliver it. This entrustment is (contractually) ...


26

The specific reason why you can't deliver general fliers in mailboxes is 18 USC 1725, which says Whoever knowingly and willfully deposits any mailable matter such as statements of accounts, circulars, sale bills, or other like matter, on which no postage has been paid, in any letter box established, approved, or accepted by the Postal Service for the ...


7

Yes, under US law (18 USC 1725) you may place misdirected mail in the mailbox of the person to whom it is addressed. You may also just knock on that person's door and hand it to the addressee.


5

In most states or localities "loitering " has a specific statutory meaning. For example in Prince Georges County. MD Section 14-139.03 provides: (a) In this Section, "loiter" means for a person to: (1) Remain on a public street, sidewalk, or pathway, including one privately-owned but used by the public in general, so as to obstruct the free passage ...


5

(As there are cases that remain sub judice, I will give only a general answer describing the disclosure process.) How does discovery disclosure work for financial crimes? Disclosure for all criminal investigations in England and Wales, including those in to financial crime, are carried out in accordance with Parts 1 and 2 of the Criminal Procedure and ...


4

There is a USPS form to fill out, to change a person's address. This page shows you what the form looks like. You should notice the text which they transcribe onto the page: NOTE: The person signing this form states that he or she is the person, executor, guardian, authorized officer, or agent of the person for whom mail would be forwarded under this order. ...


4

As for a member of the Universal Postal Union, what repercussions will occur for country B? None. Are they allowed to keep stealing stuff at the sender insurer's expense? Well, country B isn't stealing stuff. Bad actors in the employe of country B are stealing stuff. This is a matter for law enforcement in country B. If country B is endemically corrupt ...


4

The key language to be taken notice of in that code is 'by fraud or deception'. If the property manager has provided reasonable notice of a clear-out, then the code doesn't apply due to lack of fraud or deception. But at the end of the day, just go and check the mail room on a Thursday afternoon and you shouldn't have any problems.


4

Probably not There's a difference between knowing DeJoy is guilty, and proving he is guilty. The first is a matter of your personal views on epistemology; the second is a matter of law. The statute says an official cannot use "his official authority for the purpose of interfering with..." In other words, in order to charge DeJoy, the government ...


3

Does posting a letter create any 'legal' agreement between myself and the postal service? Is there any obligation to deliver a letter? Assuming that an agreement is formed, at what point in the process? When the letter entered a post-box, when it was picked up from the postbox, or later - perhaps when a post-mark is added by the postal service? ...


3

None You broke your contract with ParcelHero - they could take action against you. You say you sent a passport, which is clearly on the list of prohibited items and this makes it an Undeliverable Consignments. And “Customer shall be liable at all times for any and all Charges incurred by PH in returning, storing or disposing of an Undeliverable Consignment.”


2

A courier could open the envelope and steal the ID information inside. Whether this is likely depends on how carefully the company is in selecting couriers, and what action the company, and local law enforcement would take if such a thing were reported. There is no way to know that in general, and it might vary for different companies. I have known of US ...


2

You can sue them, notice a Rule 30(b)(6) deposition, ask a corporate representative to acknowledge your queries, and ask the court to enter an order requiring UPS to deliver your parcels.


2

First, 18 USC 1696(a) provides an escape hatch for private delivery of mail to official postboxes, that This section shall not prohibit any person from receiving and delivering to the nearest post office, postal car, or other authorized depository for mail matter any mail matter properly stamped. In other words, it's not the act of putting the thing in the ...


2

The Vatican has its own postal operator (Vatican Post) while Italy has liberalized the postal sector, i. e. besides the incumbent operator (Poste Italiane) there should also be a few smaller operators. THis means that in order to get a letter from Italy, to the pope, it must be handed over from Poste Italiane to Vatican Post. Assuming that the arrangement ...


1

The other answer sets out the general principles of disclosure in criminal cases. In the 42 cases dealt with in Hamilton v Post Office Ltd [2021] EWCA Crim 577, we also know “what actually did happen.” The Post Office’s failure to comply with its disclosure obligations caused the Court of Appeal to set aside the appellants’ convictions, even though most of ...


1

Maybe, for a few reasons. First, your restatement of Myers is incorrect. Myers does not state that the President can fire any federal official. Myers states that the President has unfettered discretion in removing executive officials. This is a crucial distinction because there are, of course, other federal officials—those in the judiciary and the ...


1

He will need to visit the USPS and have form 3575Z (internal COA) filled out for the individual. This will have the past tenants first class mail returned to sender. This will NOT stop their non-first class mail (presorted STD, marketing/junk, “or current resident”, EDDM/ECRWSS/ECRWSH, charity, political, non-profit). Non-first class mail is NOT returnable ...


1

As the answer by user6726 explains, you cannot legally fill out a forwarding order for someone else without that person's permission. However, you can write "Please forward to: [Tenant's new address]" on the mail if you have the the new address at hand, and return it to the carrier or the post office with this note, if you choose. (Cross out your ...


1

The Virginia penal system seems to have rules against loafing and loitering, in Powhatan correctional center: No loafing, loitering, or crowding around the Dispensary, Medical areas... There will be no loafing or loitering in the weight room and the Northern Correctional facility of West Virginia NO loafing WILL BE permitted in any corridor ...


1

In the US, what is illegal is possession of certain things (drugs; firearms; alcohol; explosives; stolen goods...). Taking Washington drug laws as an example, the numerous prohibitions generally start "It is unlawful for any person knowingly or intentionally...". If you requested it, you are intentionally in possession. If someone sent it to you without your ...


1

It isn’t legal If people want to send you stuff, they are free to do so. You don’t have to pay for it.


1

Your girlfriend has to have her "main residence" somewhere else, and be registered for council tax there. Then she is just "visiting" you. A PO Box will not suffice; it must be a residential address. Otherwise she will be deemed to be living in the student hall, and she (or the university) will be liable for council tax. The university will be very careful ...


1

If you send a letter, you're entering into a contract with the respective postal operator. I'm not sure when the contract is entered into (it could be when you buy postage), but the contract should be deemed to be concluded at latest when the letter enters is dropped into the collection box. The relationship between a customer and a postal operator is ...


1

This is a too-long comment, posted as an answer The Pope and the Italian authorities finally sorted their relations in the 1920s. This lead to the signing of the Lateran Pacts in 1929. According to Gordon Ireland, in "The State of the City of the Vatican," published in the American Journal of International Law, the Vatican and Italy signed a postal ...


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