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48

This article basically says "it depends": If it is genuinely used to improve tenant safety then that is OK, but if it is used to track your private life then that is not acceptable. Cameras that cover communal areas used by several properties are generally acceptable, but cameras covering individual properties are much less so. It sounds like ...


10

Adding to Paul's answer, you have considerable protections under GDPR here, and there's a host of angles you can use to get your data removed, or have it not collected in the first place. Your landlord, even as a sole trader, is required to register and pay a fee to do this to the ICO (1), and can be fined up to £4000 if he fails to do so. You have the right ...


4

Per the comment, the applicable license term seems to be Licensee agrees to maintain in confidence the source code version of the Licensed Software by using at least the same physical and other security measures as Licensee uses for its own confidential technical information and documentation, but in no case less than reasonable measures. So if your own ...


4

Chris Cuomo is wrong: the media are not different. For details, see this column by First Amendment specialist Eugene Volokh. My original answer was also wrong. Well, not wrong, but irrelevant. My answer was irrelevant because the hacked emails Cuomo was talking about do not involve national security. By focusing on the national security angle, I answered a ...


4

The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is governed by Shari`ah law. See this work for an overview of Shari`ah as it relates to compensatory damages in personal injury cases. It is a principle under Ijma (a second-order source of Islamic law) that if one is insulted or emotionally injured by another party, you are entitled to be monetarily compensated. Sharia law in ...


4

Presumably you are not being asked to sign a replacement tenancy agreement in which you have the obligation to hand over the data when you leave the property. Rather it sounds like an informal request on the part of the landlord. Such a request is unenforceable. In order for it to be legally binding, there would need to be a contract (whether oral or written)...


3

A company may retain information to comply with legal obligations, exercise legal claims or rights, or defend legal claims. Maintaining the ability to charge and refund on a credit card is within the scope of their right to retain information. I would not assume that "removing payment method" deletes the data from their database, it means that you ...


3

In the United States, this would be unlikely to result in any damages. Most states recognize at most four basic privacy torts: false light invasion of privacy public disclosure of private facts misappropriation of likeness intrusion upon seclusion The first three generally require the defendant to publish something about the plaintiff, which you've ...


2

You don’t need to comply with these laws Just stop operating in their country. If you choose to operate in a country, by operating a mine, a retail store, a factory or, say, a web site, then that country has a right, recognised by all other countries, to require you to abide by their laws while doing so. Once you start interacting with users through your ...


1

Yes, they need a court order. The cellphone provider is obligated to keep your data for at least 6 months. Any circumstance that warrants a search warrant.


1

The page you referenced contains a link to the relevant announcement, dated October 31, 2019 (released November 6, 2019) which does not really prescribe any such micro-managed "specific requirements" as they claim. (For example, via Google translate description of the eight issues they are addressing) (1) Illegal collection of user personal ...


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