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If you want to keep things secret, don’t tell people It is 100% legal for me to read your text messages, letters and emails, listen to your voicemail, watch your videos and look at your pictures and unless there is an expectation of privacy. Your mobile phone would normally be considered private. However, if you give it to me and tell me the password then ...


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Yes. By the fact that A did not take steps to protect the messages from B and used B's phone, A has no reasonable expectation of privacy from B and B is free to read and share those messages with anyone B sees fit.


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You have two questions here. A search by the government must be reasonable, under the 4th Amendment, meaning that a warrant is required or exigent circumstances must exist. Simple entering (without searching) is governed by Civil Code 1954. The law governing residential rentals is not explicit, because a a dormitory might be considered not to be a "...


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To what extent would this allow a public figure or a subject of legitimate news coverage to insist on past coverage being deleted or hidden from public access? It doesn’t. Such requests are subject to a balancing test between the right to privacy and the public interest. This involves consideration of the public profile of the person and the specific ...


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There are several diseases that are notifiable. A doctor or medical laboratory is required to inform a public health agency if any of these are found. Some of these are transmitted sexually as well as nonsexually. The list of notifiable diseases is set by state law, with some variation among states. Gunshot wounds are often notifiable. This information might ...


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How are they able to do this legally? australia According to the Australian Competition & Consumer Commission it appears to be lawful activity (notwithstanding off-topic instances of criminal harassment and the like) unless you have registered with the Australian Government's national Do Not Call Register that allows you to list your home, personal ...


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Such calls, emails or msgs may well be illegal in Australia. But how high a priority are they for law enforcement? If you haven't been successfully scammed, if all that has been taken is a few moments of your time, how likely is any police force to track down and prosecute a person or firm doing this? Remember that those sending such communications will do ...


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I don't know much about the right to be forgotten in the EU, but I can tell you that no such right exists in the United States. There have been plenty of attempts to invoke it here, but they are universally rejected as infringements on the First Amendment rights of freedom of speech and freedom of the press. See, e.g., Garcia v. Google, Inc., 786 F.3d 733 (...


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