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Businesses do hold customers' email addresses. These are routinely stored and communicated between the businesses' internal IT systems. There is nothing illegal about this. The only difference that internal email communication makes to the above is that not just machines but employees see the customers' email addresses. So, essentially the question is: is ...


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Art.5(1)(f) contains: Personal data shall be: (f) processed in a manner that ensures appropriate security of the personal data, including protection against unauthorised or unlawful processing and against accidental loss, destruction or damage, using appropriate technical or organisational measures (‘integrity and confidentiality’). Art. 25 ...


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The law involved is the US Federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), which is described at this Department of Education page. FERPA applies to schools and other educational institutions that receive certain Federal funds. It does not apply to other organizations, unless such organizations receive educational information under a contract that ...


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It totally depends on the countries (versus languages) of your target audience. A Chinese version of a website domiciled in the UK does not necessarily target visitors living in China. Absent any other clues, it targets visitors who prefer to use Chinese language. These can potentially be anywhere: for those in the UK you will need to have mere translation ...


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International contracts are tricky (Which is not to say that intra-national ones aren't tricky) Let's say you are based in the United States and put in your terms of service that it will be governed by the laws of Washington - like this. While choice of law is generally upheld as valid in most jurisdictions, there are some local laws that cannot be ...


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Should a multi-language website have different privacy policy and terms of use content for the languages it implements? No, absolutely never. Even if you opt to have translated versions of your terms of use available, every single version of your terms needs to include all of the same content. You cannot guarantee a French user will read the French language ...


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Under GDPR the principle of Data Minimization rules that companies should not keep Personal Data that is irrelevant towards the fulfillment of a given service they render you. So, YES, you can "hide"/ cover" Data on any document that goes beyond what is "vital" to ensure the Service is rendered. Let's imagine I am to become a member of a Library, I can blur ...


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Since the Steam ID contains or may contain enough information for it to be possible to link your account to you as a physical person, it would definitely be considered "personal data" according to Article 4 of the GDPR. However, by agreeing to the DOTA2 terms of service, you have given consent for them to show your information to other players (or at least ...


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If the commercial service is in Germany, then they are in for loads of trouble. Persönlichkeitsrecht (in German) https://de.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pers%C3%B6nlichkeitsrecht_(Deutschland) The right of protection of personality is a constitutional right that has been confirmed in many ways by the constitutional courts. A corporation may only be registered / ...


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If you mean the actual sample - no. It’s a physical thing, not data. If you mean the results of testing then yes if they can identify an individual (like a DNA sequence) or are linked to an identifiable individual and no if they don’t (like they are part of an anonymised database of thousands of results).


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The Internet Archive (IA) routinely takes snapshots of websites, indeed of much of the content on the web. Their service can be used to demonstrate the content of the site on the date of any such snapshot. They also have a procedure by which anyone can request a snapshot of any web page at any time. Although they do not guarantee to comply with such requests,...


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From GDPR Article 2: This Regulation applies to the processing of personal data wholly or partly by automated means and to the processing other than by automated means of personal data which form part of a filing system or are intended to form part of a filing system. A blood sample is not "personal data". If information is derived from the sample then ...


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1) theft (Diebstahl) : Intension of permanently retaining another persions belongings not fulfilled 2) possible, if the person envolved may choose to do so 3) Grobe Unfug (serious mischief), also possible if they choose to do so Wiki (in German) https://de.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bel%C3%A4stigung_der_Allgemeinheit


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Yes Posts on social networks are explicitly called out as personal data.


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I agree with wimh's answer. There are some points to add: a phone number is not unique; one number may be shared by several customers in the same household. This is the fundamental problem with the proposal. loss of privacy may cause serious damage. If Mrs X logs on and sees Mr X's transactions, she may wonder where the item that that Mr X bought, as she ...


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In the US, there is actually a lot of legislation that protects people from such annoyances. For example, if you are on the National Do Not Call List then telemarketers are not allowed to call you. They will still call anyway on occasion, "by accident". You can then ask them to take you off the list, and they will usually comply. Unfortunately you will have ...


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