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5

united-states In some countries there are laws prohibiting publishing a person's picture without that person's consent. The US has no such general rule, and many other countries do not either. The details of such laws, where they exist, vary from country to country. In the US there are two kinds of legal action that might be used by a person to stop that ...


2

Phone companies and phone manufacturers are not themselves subject to HIPAA, although they are subject to some other privacy laws. But the pharmacy, to be HIPAA compliant, needs to either have a non-disclosures agreement with the phone company that bars it from disclosing the information contained in the text messages (unless other privacy laws already bar ...


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It would merely be a "jerk move". HIPAA only applies to "covered entities": Healthcare Providers Health Plans Healthcare Clearing Houses (i.e. Paying for your health care) Business Associates of the Above) Source: CDC page on HIPAA


3

This is clearly personal information (PI) , and indeed personally identifiable information (PII). and so is Personal Data under the GDPR. Under Article 6 of the GDPR any processing must have a lawful basis. There are 6 possible bases. The most likely ones here would be (a) consent, or (f) legitimate interst, but the private association may claim some other ...


3

england-and-wales (Although most of this applies throughout the UK). In England, there are four categories of abuse: Physical, Sexual, Emotional and Neglect. Everyone who works with children must undertake yearly training to recognise the signs of each type of abuse, and know how to respond. The government document that gives statutory guidance is "...


0

The personal downside of not reporting it is slim. The personal upside of not reporting it is you keep your job and maybe see an opportunity to fix it some day (or to cash out as a hacker later if you can avoid espionage charges). The personal upside of reporting it is almost nil and it isn't likely to work. The personal downside of reporting it is that ...


6

There are two parts to this question. First, when are we "allowed to intervene"? That depends on the jurisdiction: I'll pick Washington state (US) as one illustration. You don't define "intervening" and this isn't a legal concept – let me point out that saying to a parent "You are being mean to your child" is a form of ...


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This answer is based upon united-states law. Outside the United States that law may, and indeed, is likely to, differ, as the legal analysis in U.S. law is unusual in multiple respects with regard to these issue. The premise of the question is basically incorrect. There is not a stark legal definitional distinction between physical abuse and psychological ...


0

Looks like these cameras are legal: If a dash cam is installed (e. g. for the purpose of collecting evidence in case of an accident), it is important to ensure that this camera is not constantly recording traffic, as well as persons who are near a road. This source, page 10. I assume, "constantly" means you cannot leave it recording round the ...


2

The court records generally remain sealed even after the minor becomes an adult (there are limited exceptions to the rule and both the secrecy and the exceptions are statutory matters). The fact that there was a juvenile proceeding isn't a bar to factual statements about things that happened that name names, in general. Who is bound by juvenile court secrecy ...


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