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8

The UK does have free lawyers for those who cannot afford an attorney. In fact, it is even more liberal than the US, including representation in civil cases for the most part as well (there are a few exceptions, like libel, and from what I've read, even that is changing). Rather than the main source of free representation being called public defenders, ...


8

The short answer to your question is: yes, but you shouldn't if you can possibly avoid it. You didn't specify which jurisdiction's law you were curious about, so in some jurisdictions (especially civil law jurisdictions, such as continental Europe), the the answer may be different. But under the law as it exists in most U.S. jurisdictions, a natural person ...


7

As a pro se litigant, you have the same power as an attorney to prepare your case. What is that power? Subpoena power. That is the power to compel witnesses to appear and give testimony. Along with subpoena power, you have the power given by the rules of discovery, to conduct discovery, send interrogatories (written questions to the opponent and non-...


6

If you want to bring a 1983 suit, and you can't afford or don't want to pay a lawyer, your best resource is to contact a lawyer who will represent you for free. There are civil rights and advocacy groups that will take on this type of case, and even if they won't, they may be willing to give you a quick evaluation of your case to tell you if it's something ...


6

I fully agree with Chapka that this would be inadvisable. That said, there are lower cost legal research options, especially since this is in Federal court. First, before alternatives, there may be public law libraries that offer some kind of Westlaw or Lexis access from on-site terminals. Law libraries also provide access to the practice manuals and etc. ...


5

This paper studies the question, in a restricted context of federal cases (the main problem is getting data, but turns out that some federal court clerks have been obliging). From that database, between 1998-2011 1,156,460 felony cases were resolved. 0.2% of those cases were pro se representations with virtually all cases having professional representation ("...


5

There are all manner of reasons that evidence can be excluded at a trial, most of which are set forth in rules of evidence. If the evidence was not admitted on the grounds of relevance and the charge was speeding, I presume that the reason that it was found not be to relevant was that it was not possible from a video to determine how fast someone was ...


4

For most civil matters the answer is "no". Small claims court is special since there are restrictions on using attorneys, and in that context, it depends on the rules. In Indiana, the answer in their manual is no Small Claims Rule 8 allows a person to appear at trial and, if he or she chooses, represent himself or herself and avoid the cost of hiring ...


4

You're going to an administrative hearing overseen by an "Impartial Hearing Officer" (IHO). Your goal should be to present your case in as clear, concise, and compelling a manner as possible. If there are guidelines for the hearing then abide by those. Ideally, the IHO will be a real lawyer or judge, in which case they will likely be concerned with giving ...


4

The first step is to be able to identify the presupposition, which is a claim that must be assumed to be true for the question to make sense. For instance, "Is the present king of France bald?" assumes that there is a present king of France, and that in fact is false. Such a blatant example is hard to miss (if you speak English), but a less obvious ...


4

This is not possible, simply as a matter of definitions and legal terminology. Someone who is "represented by one or more attorneys" is by definition not pro se which means representing yourself without an attorney. There are very rare instances in criminal trials involving serious consequences in which a pro se defendant is allowed to have an attorney ...


3

The general rule is that in the opening statement, the lawyer may describe what he expects the evidence and testimony to show: We will present Mr Smith, who will tell you that he saw the defendant miles away at the time of the crime But cannot make statements of fact as such. I don't see why this rule would be different for a pro se defendant. In a ...


3

This would be virtually impossible to do from scratch. If you had the guidance of someone who successfully pursued a similar legal action it might be possible. In theory you should be able to pursue grievances in court by becoming well versed in the applicable laws and rules, having impeccable attention to detail, exceptional deductive and writing skills,...


3

Most pro se litigants fail in the court procedure area. There are many intricacies about what must be completed by when. Determining jurisdiction can take a very long time, especially personal jurisdiction. These things set back cases repeatedly. Additionally, many pro se litigants fail a 12(b)(6) motion. This means the other side files a motion saying ...


3

when is it a good idea to get a lawyer? Only when you are not confident that you can put enough dedication to the matter & learning curve, or when you are not confident of your ability to cope with the emotional/frustrating toll of judicial proceedings. I do not mean this in an ironic way or to challenge you. It is just important to avoid a false sense ...


3

As a person who has done a large amount of (mostly successful) pro se work, I have long advised people against doing pro se litigation in any case where they attach serious value to their case. There are, of course, people who are well-suited to the task, but even if you have a natural aptitude for the core tasks involved (legal research, legal analysis, ...


2

Not very. In 1998 the Boston Bar Association Task Force on Unrepresented Litigants did a detailed study on this subject entitled Report on Pro Se Litigants. http://apps.americanbar.org/legalservices/delivery/downloads/bostontaskforce.pdf Among their findings was: In some types of matters unrepresented litigants do not obtain results as favorable as ...


2

The generally accepted legal citation format in the U.S. is the Bluebook. Here is a website to help you generate the citation: Citeus Legalus. As an example, here is how one would cite this New York Times article from today's paper called Debt Collectors’ Abuses Prompt Consumer Agency to Propose New Rules that you accessed online. Stacy Cowley, Debt ...


2

Disruptive? Abusive? Unprofessional? Bullying? On the other hand: Her apologists might describe it as "being an effective advocate for her client." There are a few objective measures you can reference: The American Bar Association lays out what it believes are the professional standards of conduct for its members. You might review that and note some ...


2

New York Courts even offer this encouraging CourtHelp website for pro se guidance on common actions. (posted by @feetwet) This got me unstuck. I found that page rather overwhelming, but I went to their contact page. I followed the simple instructions there, and emailed my question to question@nycourts.gov. I emailed them in the evening, and by 9:15 the ...


2

Is it possible to be pro se and represent yourself at trial with the ability to, for instance, raise objections at trial, and also be represented by one or more attorneys? Yes, at least in some jurisdictions. One recent example from Michigan is (civil case) Lakin v. Rund, 896 N.W.2d 76 (2016). This is also known as "hybrid representation".


2

The answer to this question is a function of local rules adopted by the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the district where the action is pending. Those rules are not uniform. Usually, the answer would be no. The federal courts have been reluctant to allow "limited representations" relative to the state courts.


2

If you’re talking about this in the context of a witness being asked questions in a courtroom, then you should consider “leading questions.” A leading question is one that essentially “puts words in the mouth of” the witness. The question itself contains the desired information or acts as a prompt toward certain information. In general, you can’t ask your ...


2

what are the steps to kick off the dismiss procedure except for sending him an email of notice? In addition to sending him an email, you should also notify him via USPS Certified Mail with Return Receipt. That will make it harder for him to deny his awareness of your decision to fire him (keep in mind that he might otherwise try to send you more bills). ...


2

In New Zealand, a successful litigant in person is entitled to recover disbursements but not costs. This rule can be traced back many centuries to passages in Sir Edward Coke’s The Second Part of the Institutes of the Laws of England (E and R Brooke, London, 1797). At page 288 he said: Here is expresse mention made but of the costs of his writ, but it ...


2

In accordance with the rules for civil procedure in the appropriate court. If you don’t know what these are you have 3 basic choices: Hire a lawyer Learn fast Lose.


1

The objection to be made by a lawyer would be "lack of foundation", if the untrue assumption hasn't been established, or "misstates the evidence" if the assumption has arguably been discussed in prior testimony. A witness could also answer in the form, "That question doesn't make sense to me because . . . ."


1

You subpoena the evidence from the person who has it. They must either produce it or demonstrate to the court that they don't have it or they are not required by law to produce it (e.g. because it is not sufficiently defined). Each court system has procedures for how to do this. You can do it yourself (and almost certainly screw it up) or you can hire a ...


1

I wonder if the word you are looking for is "badgering" or badgering the witnesses - defined in Nolo's Plain English dictionary as "When, instead of being questioned, a witness is subjected to derisive comments ("You expect the jury to believe that?"), legal arguments posed as questions ("With all the evidence against you, how can you deny that you stole the ...


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