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2

ECJ case C170/3 covers this (BPM on car imports to the Netherlands, when the car was not originally owned by the driver/importer) specifically. There are two requirements: You must own the car at the moment that you import it. Prior to import, you must have had a connection to the car. The first condition is logical; if your parents would still own the car ...


1

Without reference to Dutch law, and thus assuming it requires you or a member of your household to have been the owner of the motor vehicle for six months, the question hinges on whether in German law, the possessor of a motor vehicle that was bought by someone else, is indeed its owner. Unlike in English law, possession and ownership are separate concepts ...


-1

No someone else's car is not part of your household effects. Your effects would be things you own. Not things other people own.


0

Short answer: No. Long answer: Well, no, but the size of your find is going to cause some legal concerns. As a rule, any currency is technically a bearer bond, which means it belongs to the person who is holding the physical issue of currency at the moment of transaction, so if you find an amount of cash just lying around on the ground, and pick it up, ...


1

It's not just an expectation to build a house, the plots may have deed restrictions which mandate it. Especially in a housing development, deed restrictions are common to make sure owners are building homes to match the neighborhood. Likely restrictions would include breaking ground on a house (of an approved design) within 12 to 24 months of purchase of the ...


4

Zoning is controlled by the municipality (and possibly state, given where KC is) so you would have to check the rules for the municipality of interest and look at the specific zoning designation (e.g. RP-OE, R-2, MXD). Here for example is a page of code from Overland Park, which tells you that RP-4 land can be used for a private park, but agriculture is not ...


1

Your partner has been misled. It is possible that this was not deliberate on the part of the vendors. They may well not have considered the possibility of taking the shed or the greenhouse until their solicitor mentioned it to them, or they realized that the shed and greenhouse wasn't going to be included in their new home either. There is a ...


0

Misrepresentation Under English law, misrepresentation (see also) is when a false statement was made that induced you to enter a contract. It comes in three flavours: fraudulent, negligent and innocent. Your partner's situation is most likely negligent since the vendor owed them a duty to represent the property truthfully and carelessly didn't but does not ...


-3

If you had a contract signed saying those things would be included, then yes they should be included, because the seller would be in violation of the contract if they aren't. If you just saw them on the materials and it was cleared up before the sale was finalized then no you can't force them to include them.


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