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Yes The directors of a company have a fiduciary duty to act within the law for the benefit of their shareholders - not to their customers, not to the government, not to the environment and not to the public. A lawsuit against the company will incur financial loss irrespective of if it is won or lost. It is difficult to see how it is in the shareholder's ...


4

Whether published or unpublished, they are still protected by copyright. (They are probably unpublished for copyright purposes, but in the US this makes little difference for any recently created work (that is anything after 2002). For older work see the Cornell chart.) They cannot be copied or distributed without permission, unless an exception to ...


4

Copyright includes authorization of derivative works such as translations, so you must have permission of the copyright holder to create a translation. You could be sued for creating the unauthorized translation for your friend. If you attempt to further distribute the book, the chances of getting sued increase substantially. That path probably includes your ...


3

You can take pictures of public buildings and use them in your game, if you want. You cannot copy pictures (of anything) taken by someone else without the copyright owner's permission, so you need Google's permission to copy their photographs. The public building exception is specifically about architectural works and does not include e.g. murals drawn on ...


2

What is the current license and copyright status of the works? Unknown Will the company need to acquire a license? Yes From whom would the company be able to obtain a global use license for online digital publishing in this scenario? From the current copyright holder or a person with a permissive licence (or chain of permissive ...


2

The closest thing to what you're describing is the new rights granted to cultural heritage institutions described in Articles 8-11 of the new Copyright Directive (draft Articles 7-9). Note this doesn't apply to individuals, just cultural heritage institutions, which is defined by Article 2(3): ‘cultural heritage institution’ means a publicly accessible ...


1

You need the valid permission of the copyright holder. The publisher may actually be the copyright holder, if the author sold the book including the copyright, so then obviously you need permission of the publisher. The author could have signed a contract that gives the publisher the exclusive rights to create French and Italian translations, so you could ...


1

It depends It depends what rights the author sold to the publisher and what rights they didn’t. The author would need to review their contract to see who has the right to authorise translations.


1

The only elements of such a work that would be protected by copyright are the contemporary creative aspects. That would include (recently) added commentary, concordance or artwork. Presenting a work in a new file format does not constitute a creative addition, so there is no protection for the PDFness of a public domain work.


1

This will depend on the license under which you use the ebook. Some ebooks have a license which explicitly permits such sharing. In the absence of such permission, it will depend on how you plan to provide access to the ebook to those you plan to "share" with. Most ways of sharing would involve making a copy at some point in the process, which you may not do ...


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