18

In the US, the right to publish is vested in the copyright holder, who is initially the author. That right can be transferred for example by a transfer agreement, and it can be inherited just as other property can be inherited. Under the terms of the will, it is most likely that the copyright was transferred to the spouse even if the will didn not say "...


16

Yes The directors of a company have a fiduciary duty to act within the law for the benefit of their shareholders - not to their customers, not to the government, not to the environment and not to the public. A lawsuit against the company will incur financial loss irrespective of if it is won or lost. It is difficult to see how it is in the shareholder's ...


12

The underlying text(s) may be subject to copyright protection, but the individual words are not -- they are usually independently existing words of the language (there are invented words like "chrowl" which I have never seen appearing in a word frequency list). A frequency count is the simply a factual report about language use in a corpus. Even in ...


8

Data is not copyrightable, but databases (structured, organized data) might be. This depends on the jurisdiction, e.g. database rights are recognized in the EU. Whereas copyright protects creative expression, database rights protect the effort that went into collecting and organizing the data. Note that even when database rights apply, this doesn't prevent ...


4

The first copyright law dates from 1710, so it's not true that Chekhov wrote before any copyright laws. Any work from prior to 1924 isn't necessarily safe to use (it depends on when the author died). It is in the US but will complicate things if you publish internationally. Unless you translate with something like Google translate, translation is definitely ...


4

The closest that you can come to an official list is the registry maintained by the US copyright office. That tells you which copyrights have been registered, and does not tell you much about items not on the list. But, if a work is registered (and the copyright has not expired, which you can calculate), you know it is not in the public domain. The question ...


3

Can you locate your license (generally not a trivial task)? It may appear under Help-About and a click to view EULA. The EULA specifically addresses redistribution of parts of the software and number of installations you can make with a single license. They do not say what uses you make make of the software, except that "You may not rent, lease, lend or ...


3

The Merida Font As noted by Tardigrade, the Merida chess font is available from https://github.com/vasiliyaltunin/chess-merida-font. However this is a derived work which incorporates a much older file containing the actual glyphs in TTF format. Edit: If you google for "Armando Hernandez Marroquin" you will find a lot of font download sites offering ...


2

Unfortunately I consider this an incomplete answer for now; hoping I can find more later (and apologies for formatting; will fix later). This page: https://github.com/vasiliyaltunin/chess-merida-font/blob/master/README.md states that the "Chess Merida Font" available there is made available under MPL 2.0. It then however explicitly states that it's ...


2

“The attempted rape charge was dismissed along with all the others, but the broader sentiment was endorsed.” Is the above statement potentially defamatory? No, or at least not in isolation. Although very unlikely, one might reach a different conclusion only if one is given additional context and/or additional contents of the article. It appears that ...


2

All rights reserved When someone says "all rights reserved" on copyright material, what does that mean? Well, the rights that copyright gives vary slightly by jurisdiction but takingaustralia as pretty representative, they are spelled out in s31 of the Copyright Act 1968: (1) For the purposes of this Act, unless the contrary intention appears, ...


2

Yes. There definitely lies copyright on any database established in the EU. A word frequency list is a database, and has a 15 year sui generis copyright. This also includes derivative works. lightly remixing the wordlist counts as a derivative work, and falls under copyright protection. The answer provided by "user6726" is incomplete. While ...


2

Note that even when database rights apply, this doesn't prevent someone else from performing the same analysis and coming up with an equivalent database. I think Anon gives good advice on this question, the only change I would make is in reference to the above. It is in the nature of copyright (unlike patent) that independent creation cannot be an ...


1

In the EU: In Ryanair Ltd v PR Aviation BV [2015] the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) held that subject to national law the owner of a publicly accessible database is free to determine by contract the conditions of its use. In other words the owner is free to set the T&Cs and you must abide by them or not use the website. You can ensure you ...


1

Documents of a commercial nature have been in Word from the beginning. No one would buy it if Microsoft had any claim on one's output.


1

You need the valid permission of the copyright holder. The publisher may actually be the copyright holder, if the author sold the book including the copyright, so then obviously you need permission of the publisher. The author could have signed a contract that gives the publisher the exclusive rights to create French and Italian translations, so you could ...


1

It depends It depends what rights the author sold to the publisher and what rights they didn’t. The author would need to review their contract to see who has the right to authorise translations.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible