Hot answers tagged

12

The Radiocommunications Agency (now OFCOM) issued some guidance about this in 2001. The specific offence is defined by s5 Wireless Telegraphy Act 1949: Any person who ... uses any wireless telegraphy apparatus with intent to obtain information as to the contents, sender or addressee of any message (whether sent by means of wireless telegraphy or not) of ...


6

What legal problems might you run into? Well, you'd be violating 47 USC 301, which requires a license for anyone broadcasting in the United States. Penalties for that are given in 47 USC 501 (a fine of up to $10,000 and up to a year in prison), 47 USC 502 (an additional fine of $500 per day of violation), 47 USC 501(b)(2)(D) (forfeiture of up to $10,000 ...


5

In the US, radio communication proper is regulated by the FCC and the NTIA. The FAA has nothing to do with it; they regulate things as they affect airplanes, but the actual radio rules are set by the FCC, and since frequency allocation is a purely radio thing the FAA has nothing official to do with it. The breakdown between FCC and NTIA is that the FCC deals ...


5

The ITU's Radiocommunication Sector (ITU-R) is responsible for worldwide spectrum coordination. It's an agency of the United Nations. World Radio Conferences are held regularly for spectrum planning and coordination purposes. In the US, the FCC is responsible domestically; in the UK, it's OFCOM.


5

Say I build myself a faraday cage/wave screen around my house, potentially resulting in poor nework coverage for my neighbours. Questions about land property and constructing permits apart, can I be sued for that? By the network operator? by the neighbours? In most countries, the use of the radio spectrum is regulated (who may send what on which ...


5

For the USA, the FCC has a few words to say on the subject: “Generally, “jammers” — which are also commonly called signal blockers, GPS jammers, cell phone jammers, text blockers, etc. — are illegal radio frequency transmitters that are designed to block, jam, or otherwise interfere with authorized radio communications.” (https://transition.fcc.gov/eb/...


4

Yes, if it works. FCC regulations allow operation of interfering equipment (for tests and experiment) provided the interference is fully contained in a Faraday cage. You must still "comply with the general prohibition against causing harmful interference to other spectrum users".


4

Even though as you found out calling is also sufficient, there is also a form available for this: Abmeldung der Wohnung/en One of the reasons listed is Ich ziehe dauerhaft ins Ausland (I am moving abroad) They ask for a Meldeamtliche Bescheinigung for this case. That's the deregistration notice.


3

In Canada, the technical aspects of broadcasting (Who gets to use which frequency, what needs to be restricted to avoid causing interference, allocating station call signs) are regulated by the Department of Industry (Also known as "Industry Canada"). The information being transmitted (whether by radio or by wire) is regulated by the Canadian Radio-...


3

probably, now it can be done online via : https://www.rundfunkbeitrag.de/buergerinnen_und_buerger/formulare/abmelden/index_ger.html


3

UK-based answer: With regards to rights above land, we know from Bernstein v Skyviews and General Ltd [1978] QB 479 that a person owns: "the airspace above his land to such height as was necessary for the ordinary use and enjoyment of his land and the structures upon it" Though this wouldn't allow you to sue someone for flying a helicopter or airplane ...


3

In the United States - Flying within Class G airspace (max 400 ft.) over private property without permission is trespassing (min 500 ft.) A 107 certified pilot is not restricted to 400 ft., and may have a BVLOS waiver. (It can be difficult to assess whether a drone is above 500 feet.) In the US, it is a violation of federal criminal law to instigate any ...


2

It is Illegal Specifically, it is in breach of s7 of the TELECOMMUNICATIONS (INTERCEPTION AND ACCESS) ACT 1979: (1) A person shall not: (a) intercept; (b) authorize, suffer or permit another person to intercept; or (c) do any act or thing that will enable him or her or another person to intercept; a communication passing over a ...


2

In the UK, Ofcom regulates all types of radio frequencies. UK legislation the Wireless Telegraphy Act of 2006 is the legal standpoint that they follow, but they manage everything from TV channels to Two way Radios. Ofcom licence the installation or use of wireless telegraphy radio equipment in the UK mainland including Northern Ireland and territorial waters,...


2

Don't believe everything you hear on the radio or see on TV. That radio show is probably staged with actors; read https://didyouknowfacts.com/former-dj-radio-business-fake/ and the linked AMA on Reddit. If it happens that radio show is not entirely acted out, I'm sure the radio station has their legal ducks in a row. The station as a business and the DJ as ...


2

Is it legal to intercept radio communications in the 2.4Ghz band in the United Kingdom? No—the interception of any radio communication in the United Kingdom is an offence under Section 48(1)(a) of the Wireless Telegraphy Act 2006: A person commits an offence if, otherwise than under the authority of a designated person, he uses wireless telegraphy ...


1

Presumably this refers to the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000, and the government's advice regarding interception of communications, where Section 1(1) of RIPA makes it a criminal offence for a person intentionally, and without lawful authority, to intercept in the United Kingdom (UK) any communication in the course of its transmission if ...


1

I called up the ARD customer care and they said we can just call them and tell them when we are leaving the country and they will automatically de-register us from that month. I guess they will cross check with the city de-registration details.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible