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Yes Businesses (and consumers) can choose who to do business with and what information they ask for and disclose and when they do that. If you’re uncomfortable with how they do business, don’t deal with them. If they don’t like how you do business, they are free not to deal with you. This is called discrimination. However, it is not unlawful because only ...


21

The tenant wouldn't be involved in this at all. The tenant rents from the landlord, and the landlord gives them an account number where the tenant sends the money every month. How would the tenant be involved with you? Actually, if I was the tenant and I was told to pay the rent to some third party, that would be the reddest of all red flags to me. As a ...


16

Debt factoring is common practice Fees generally range about 1-2% higher than mortgage rates depending on how prevalent bad debts are in the industry. This means I can get what you’re selling for less than a quarter of your price. Typical arrangements are that I get 80% when the debt falls due and the balance (less your fee of say 3%) when the debtor pays. ...


16

It is not uncommon for a landlord to instruct tenants to make payments via a lockbox service to an address other than the landlord's business office address. It is also not uncommon for a landlord to hire a management company that collects all rent and also handles maintenance and other on-premises services. Such services, I understand, charge rather less ...


4

Sam Wilson: Found a place in Brookyln yet? Steve Rogers/Captain America: I don't think I can afford a place in Brooklyn. NYC is a very in-demand market, with many apartment-seekers being out-of-state dreamers, or local residents who have realistically been priced out of their own town by gentrification. This demand overloads landlords - ties up a lot of ...


4

Since this seems to have been viewed a lot, an update/answer. I can't comment on the normalcy of such clauses since this has been my only experience. But the Estate Agent immediately struck the clause without any fight, so it seems like it was just there "in case I let it slide". It turned out to be a great decision, since I ended up finding my own ...


3

In general, a person may appoint as many agents as s/he wishes for a particular purpose. The principal is responsible for the actions of all such agents, unless they exceeded their powers or instructions, and in some cases even then. In this particular case all such accesses would have to be "reasonable" taken together, and if the various agents ...


2

It’s agents all the way down I can appoint an agent. That agent can appoint an agent who will also be my agent. Repeat step 2 as often as necessary. Of course, an agency agreement can prohibit sub-agency but the details of that will generally not be publicly known. Which is the reason that agency law includes the concept of apparent authority which means ...


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