20

Laws regarding billboards and advertising are very local in nature and are typically handled under city/county zoning ordinances. Start with calling your local county zoning office. They will tell you the city/county laws regarding your particular residential zoning overlay, if city or state laws supersede county laws, and recent changes in law that might ...


10

It means what it says The person who owns the land has a right to a seat in the parish church and, if there are not enough seats then they get one and other people have to stand. This is all pretty archaic but it stems from English law where parishes were geo-political and not just religious. Who got to sit was decided by the church-wardens and parishioners ...


9

Is there a way for us to prevent the sale of the house until they have moved the fence? For example, it seems that filing suit against the current owners doesn't necessarily prevent the sale, and that the suit would be pointless after the sale is complete. You can't prevent the sale, but if you file suit to adjudicate the boundary dispute and file ...


6

It would depend on jurisdiction. I can tell you that my home county of Montgomery County, Maryland has a complete ban on billboards that aren't store marquees. They waged a long legal battle to enforce it against the last grandfathered billboard owner. (They eventually settled by offering several prime bus shelter advertising spaces)


4

You did not specify a country or the specific contracts that might rule your condominium. At least in some jurisdictions indeed the repair cost of private portions cannot be shared. Moreover, you may not be required to pay some costs for common portions if you refuse to do so and won't make use of them. Do I have to sue them to fix this issue? A lengthy law-...


4

The mortgage is part of the title on the land new-south-wales First, a mortgage is a right given to a mortgagee to seize and sell the land if obligations under another contract are not fulfilled. Most usually the mortgage is offered as security for a loan taken out by the mortgagors (landowner), however, mortgages can be given for all sorts of other ...


3

Can the HOA compel payment? Yes, at least from the standpoint of unjust enrichment or quantum meruit. That is because the resident obtains some benefit(s) from the HOA's activity & expenses, such as the maintenance of common areas and other items that advance the common good of the community. However, a drastic or arbitrary increase in invoices might ...


3

One widely-used book on the topic is Brown's Boundary Control and Legal Principles. I have the 4th edition published in 1995, and the relevant chapter is 8, "Locating Easements and Reversions". The law varies from state to state. In New England, it is likely for interstate, US, and state highways, the state will own the roadbed in fee. Smaller roads are ...


3

Rob is responsible. No Bull! Around the world, the law of wandering cattle depends on the details. New Zealand is no different. This case is covered by s 26 of the Impounding Act of 1955, Damages for Trespass. As you said, S 26(1)(d) says Bob is entitled to damages whenever his "land (whether fenced or unfenced) is situated in a city." This is ...


2

Your neighbor's fence encroaches (not trespasses) on your property, so the first stem would be for you to write a demand letter where you state what the encroachment is and what reason you have for believing that there is an encroachment. You need to make a specific demand, that is, don't just provide the information that the fence encroaches on your ...


2

One way to get what you want is to persuade prospective buyers make this be a condition of the sale. Whether or not this works would depend on getting the ultimate buyer to care about this wall, when they may not be aware that there is a problem. If you limit yourself to truthful non-libelous statements, you could post a sign on your property and hope that ...


2

There are three potential crimes: vandalism, trespass, and fraud. A conviction on any of these counts would require the state to prove bad intent, for example you would have to prove malicious intent for vandalism, or that they knew that they had no permission to be on the roof. Their defense could be as simple as "I'm so sorry, we got the wrong address&...


2

Yes such an arrangement can be made legally. Owners cannot be evicted. But a contract could provide for regular payments (rent) and that the right to use/occupy the property is contingent on those payments being made. It could even provide that if the payments are sufficiently behind, that a portion of that party's share would be forfeit to cover the amount ...


1

You need a lawyer. What happens to the house, and what steps are necessary to make the wife the sole owner, depend on several complicated factors. It's unlikely that a quit claim deed will play any part in the process.


1

I presume that your father was the sole owner of the house, you are the executor of his estate, and there are no legal impediments to transferring ownership of the house to your mother. You can execute a quitclaim deed transferring the property, where (if you do it yourself) you get the legal description of the property, draft or fill in an appropriate form, ...


1

In general this is referred to as "discretion of authority." An HOA has to adhere to its declarations and bylaws, and government laws can proscribe what an HOA can do (e.g., housing discrimination is not legal in the U.S., even for an HOA). But as long as it follows its own rules it is presumed to be acting within its rights as a private entity. And it is ...


1

There are presumably bylaws for the HOA which say things like "we can charge dues" and "we can build up assets for the general benefit of the HOA" such as maintaining the common areas. The first question is whether it is proper for the association to fix problems on an individual member's property, i.e. is this a benefit generally available to all members? ...


1

On the face of it, no. But it would depend on a number of factors such as the nature of the agreement to rent (written contract, sub let, if you are on the lease or not, if the landlord knows about you etc), and the nature of the eviction (reasonable notice, reason for doing so, term of agreed lease etc). If you could provide more detail with those issues I ...


1

I am not convinced that the transaction you describe is a gift or that this is a beneficial way for you to characterize the transaction. I think that it is more fair to characterize it as a sale of the property for some nominal amount of consideration (e.g. $1,000). A transfer of property to an arms-length stranger is presumptively a sale for fair market ...


1

Is this kind of rule illegal, can I contest it in court, or do towns have the right to make arbitrary or pointless zoning restrictions at their whim? This kind of rule is completely legal. You could sue, but you would almost certainly lose. Generally speaking, towns have the right to make arbitrary or pointless zoning restrictions at their whim. This ...


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