6

It is mildly hard to say. First, one has to determine if he was an employee hired to do something like invent the WWW. He "spent time" at CERN, but was an independent contractor in his first period (1980), then took up a fellowship in 1984. "Fellowship" is generally not an "employment" relationship in the relevant sense, and academics are rarely "employees" ...


6

Why would the EU expect that any of its laws would apply to my business? It doesn't. Unless you choose to do business in the EU (which is possible, thanks to the wonders of the World Wide Web). Then, and only then, do you have to comply with EU law, including the GDPR. From a comment by @BenCollins: I'm talking about non-EU online retail that does ...


6

The memo you've linked refers to the Denver Building and Fire code (the 2011 edition, not the current 2016 edition, but the section numbers still seem to match up), which in turn includes the 2015 International Fire Code as amended. The "Listed" wording comes from Denver's amendments, while the definition comes from chapter 2 of the IFC: LISTED. ...


6

What legal problems might you run into? Well, you'd be violating 47 USC 301, which requires a license for anyone broadcasting in the United States. Penalties for that are given in 47 USC 501 (a fine of up to $10,000 and up to a year in prison), 47 USC 502 (an additional fine of $500 per day of violation), 47 USC 501(b)(2)(D) (forfeiture of up to $10,000 ...


6

You can either object to the terms of the settlement, or opt out of the settlement by filing papers with the appropriate court by the November 19, 2019 deadline. If you do not do so, you will be bound by the settlement ultimately approved, which is functionally a class action lawsuit, a form of lawsuit that can bind people who don't affirmatively sign up ...


5

Yes, and this is very common - Cuba, North Korea and Iran are often excluded. Mind you, this is from a US perspective. The banned country may have other ideas about the legality of the ban under its laws. But if you weren't planning to do business with that country anyway, that's not exactly going to hurt you.


4

There is a specific exemption in 29 USC 213(c)(3) that The provisions of section 212 of this title relating to child labor shall not apply to any child employed as an actor or performer in motion pictures or theatrical productions, or in radio or television productions. See this article for further analysis, a propos state laws. Incidentally, the ...


4

Your question seems to be based on some false assumptions. As far as I can tell: There is no federal requirement for an Uber driver to have a class A, B or C license. Just because they are commonly called "commercial" licenses, it does not follow that every kind of commercial driving necessarily requires you to have one. The US Department of ...


4

In general, anyone can buy potentially dangerous chemicals. My local service station sells petrol, my local liquor store sells alcohol, my local supermarket sells ammonia, my local pool shop sells chlorine, my local hardware store sells poisons and my local chemist sells drugs. The world is full of dangerous stuff and all of it is for sale. Certain ...


3

None First, at the time of the invention he was working for CERN, ownership of the IP he created belongs to them. Second, CERN decided not to patent the invention and released it publicly, so they don't own the IP. Third, even if they did own the protocols, they could only charge people for using it, they would have no rights over what was transmitted ...


3

The FDA approved the device as requiring a prescription (not OTC). FDA regulations govern the manufacture or distribution of devices and drugs, not the consumption. An overview of FDA regulation is here. They say they they are "responsible for regulating firms who manufacture, repackage, relabel, and/or import medical devices sold in the United States". The ...


3

It is not true to say that there is "only minimal regulation" of arbitration in the US: arbitrations are conducted under law, usually the Federal Arbitration Act but sometimes equivalent state laws and must be conducted in accordance with the rules agreed to by the parties. Further they can be appealed, however, the grounds for appeal are restricted to those ...


3

This would appear to be a simple application of contract law - the exchange of money for a promise (to sell at a fixed price in the future). Option contracts are only regulated if they relate to options over securities (like company shares) - not if they are over personal property (like baseball cards).


3

From the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) website: An employer must have a certain number of employees to be covered by the laws we enforce. This number varies depending on the type of employer (for example, whether the employer is a private company, a state or local government agency, a federal agency, an employment agency, or a labor ...


3

To make a safe, legally-compliant and industry-compliant biomedical device, one must build that device to a certain set of standards. How do I find out what those standards even are? For one, start reading: http://www.fda.gov/MedicalDevices/ResourcesforYou/Industry/default.htm The FDA is one of the primary regulatory bodies that you will work with in ...


3

In general, you don’t need an alternative defence. It is inherent in the common law that, unless the statute is explicitly retroactive (and legislators are reluctant to go there) it cannot make illegal that which was at the time of the act, legal. For example, assume the old sign had unlimited and the new sign reduces this to 2 hours. If you parked before ...


3

Regarding the question of whether your particular small business will need to comply with the GDPR depending on a few things I think the answer may be no. I was recently reading an Australian government document Australian businesses and the EU General Data Protection Regulation that describes how it affects Australian entities. It contains the following ...


3

Contracts cannot override the law. If it were possible for a contract to negate any and all laws that the drafting party didn't like, there would be no point in much consumer or general protection law at all. It is possible to say that you will not serve customers from the EU, but having done so without knowledge, you're still obliged under EU law to adhere ...


3

It is not possible for someone to forfeit their rights because the GDPR is compulsory law. In the EU, laws can be regulatory or compulsory. In case of an agreement, regulatory laws can be set aside, if both parties agree on that. But compulsory laws cannot be set aside. Of course laws can also be partly compulsory. For example provisions which cannot be ...


2

There are many regulations to consider, for the firearms themselves, the permits needed by potential customers, and licensing you will need as a business dealing with firearms and ammunition. Start with the Home Office: https://www.gov.uk/search?q=firearms I.e., https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/479794/...


2

This would be illegal in the United States, and my guess (although I've not looked) it would also be in Rome, as well as any other first-world (for lack of a better term) nation. Bottling water in the US is heavily regulated by the FDA. You can read all about it at this link: http://www.fda.gov/Food/FoodborneIllnessContaminants/BuyStoreServeSafeFood/...


2

There is almost certainly a policy that covers this. You should probably follow it. There might be disciplinary consequences but I doubt a first offense would be too serious. The longer you go before reporting it the worse it might look.


2

Violations of 15 USC 52 can generally only be enforced by the Fair Trade Commission (FTC) in civil lawsuits seeking injunctions or civil fines pursuant to 15 USC 45; it is not a crime to violate 15 USC 52 as your use of the term "prosecute" might imply. In particular, 15 USC 45(n) in the enforcement provisions applying to all types of violations of that ...


2

There isn't likely to be a single universal definition; a word can be defined in different ways for different laws. It's entirely possible that these laws have no more specific definition of "food" than what you've found. In that case, a court interpreting the law would presumably follow the plain meaning rule, under which "ordinary words have their ...


2

No Federal prosecutors are representatives of the Attorney General of the United States and act on his/her behalf: not on their own account. From the DoJ website: This Act established the Attorney General as head of the Department of Justice and gave the Attorney General direction and control of U.S. Attorneys and all other counsel employed on behalf of ...


2

Yes. definitely appeal. I used to be the person these very type of appeals were brought before, and if someone took the time to appeal and actually showed up for the hearing, waited half the day for their 20 minutes, i typically cut it in half and if there wasn't a clear standard or if it was the first offense, I often waived the whole fine and turned it ...


2

The only applicable law for the US would seem to be FCC regulations against interfering with "any radio communications of any station licensed or authorized". Marriott Hotels was fined substantially for blocking people's hotspots within the hotel. As I understand "tempest device", this is a method of obtaining information from stray EMR from computers and ...


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