30

Mockery is allowed; hate speech isn’t While freedom of speech is guaranteed under French law it does have limits. Since 2004, these limits have applied to gender and sexuality. Mockery is contemptuous or insulting speech; hate speech or vilification incites hatred, serious contempt or ridicule. The boundary between them must be established on a case-by-case ...


14

Mocking, or criticising homosexuality, or LGBT as a concept is OK. For example, former governement member Christine Boutin said "Homosexuality is an abomination", and it was considered OK (after appeals, she lost in lower courts, but eventually prevailed). Mocking, or criticising LGBT people is not. For example, far right magazine "Minute"...


7

The Free Exercise Clause of the First Amendment requires government restrictions on churches to satisfy a compelling government interest, such as preventing massive deaths from disease. The Establishment Clause of the First Amendment prohibits the government from granting special privileges to a specific religion or to all religions (Everson v. Board of ...


4

Ignoring the question of whether knowingly trying to deceive the IRS about the nature and purposes of an organization is a crime or even a lie, running any sort of tax-exempt organization for your own benefit is tax evasion and a crime. What you propose actually does happen in the US, but it's non commonly done by claiming tax exempt status a religious ...


4

I think it is not possible to answer the question as is, but this document from the Indian courts lays out the relevant legal variables. A major split is between Sharers and Residuaries: a Sharers are all related by blood. A secondary split relates to testate vs. intestate succession (was there a will?). There are also special rules for West Bengal, Chennai ...


2

The scholars may be correct. The husband died first, so his widow and daughter inherit their % share from his estate. The father-in-law then died, and unless she is a beneficiary in his wasiyat, the widow is not one of his heirs so she is not eligible to inherit.


2

Your hypothetical is a non-sequitur, whence it is not amenable to legal remedies. Legislation does not contemplate the notion or possibility of [natural person's] reincarnation. Or at least you don't point to a specific legal system where the concept of reincarnation is admissible. Even if a legal system acknowledged the concept of reincarnation, one ought ...


2

It may well be the case that registering a phony church is easy and that there are no particular checks. However, this by itself would gain you no tax benefits. In order to actually reduce your personal taxes, you'd have to do something like funneling some part of your income into the church, and then having the church pay for expenses that you'd otherwise ...


2

In the US, there is no required registering of churches and religion is an unregulated industry because of the First Amendment to the Constitution: "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof". Congress does have the power to levy taxes, and makes certain exceptions to the general ...


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