30

Mockery is allowed; hate speech isn’t While freedom of speech is guaranteed under French law it does have limits. Since 2004, these limits have applied to gender and sexuality. Mockery is contemptuous or insulting speech; hate speech or vilification incites hatred, serious contempt or ridicule. The boundary between them must be established on a case-by-case ...


14

As cited by @xuhdev, discrimination on the basis of marital status is prohibited in Colorado. And, even though age is not on the list, the couple could claim that you discriminate them based on their marital status, whether current or would-be, and whether related to their age or not. Note that the reason why you discriminate is irrelevant: whether you do ...


13

Mocking, or criticising homosexuality, or LGBT as a concept is OK. For example, former governement member Christine Boutin said "Homosexuality is an abomination", and it was considered OK (after appeals, she lost in lower courts, but eventually prevailed). Mocking, or criticising LGBT people is not. For example, far right magazine "Minute"...


7

The Free Exercise Clause of the First Amendment requires government restrictions on churches to satisfy a compelling government interest, such as preventing massive deaths from disease. The Establishment Clause of the First Amendment prohibits the government from granting special privileges to a specific religion or to all religions (Everson v. Board of ...


6

In your hypothetical situation, I'm not aware of any law that prohibits denial of service merely because of age. (But as other answers show, marital status discrimination might and might not be relevant here. If there is martial status discrimination, then the discrimination would be illegal.) Age for places of public accommodation is not a protected class ...


4

Just to be clear, the initial linked Q&A does not show that bakers in certain US states can legally refuse service on the basis of sexual orientation, is concludes that federal law does not prohibit discrimination based on sexual orientation. Colorado law does. So in Colorado, you would be open to a discrimination lawsuit, if you specifically refuse to ...


4

Ignoring the question of whether knowingly trying to deceive the IRS about the nature and purposes of an organization is a crime or even a lie, running any sort of tax-exempt organization for your own benefit is tax evasion and a crime. What you propose actually does happen in the US, but it's non commonly done by claiming tax exempt status a religious ...


3

is spousal immunity a defense for a forced restraining order by a biological father if he won't even speak to a suitor (i.e. may I take your daughter on a date)? There is no such thing as "spousal immunity". Your post is replete with unclear references, unclear statements, and seemingly unrelated questions. But it is noteworthy that spousal privilege (not "...


3

Would it be legal in Germany for someone to display swastikas in a specifically Buddhist or Hindu religious context (e.g. incorporating them into the architecture of a Buddhist or Hindu temple)? Yes, it would be legal, since through the religious context it is clear that the conditions set in 86 StGB (Dissemination of propaganda material of unconstitutional ...


2

Your hypothetical is a non-sequitur, whence it is not amenable to legal remedies. Legislation does not contemplate the notion or possibility of [natural person's] reincarnation. Or at least you don't point to a specific legal system where the concept of reincarnation is admissible. Even if a legal system acknowledged the concept of reincarnation, one ought ...


2

It may well be the case that registering a phony church is easy and that there are no particular checks. However, this by itself would gain you no tax benefits. In order to actually reduce your personal taxes, you'd have to do something like funneling some part of your income into the church, and then having the church pay for expenses that you'd otherwise ...


2

In the US, there is no required registering of churches and religion is an unregulated industry because of the First Amendment to the Constitution: "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof". Congress does have the power to levy taxes, and makes certain exceptions to the general ...


1

Art. 25 of the Indian Constitution says (in part) Subject to public order, morality and health and to the other provisions of this Part, all persons are equally entitled to freedom of conscience and the right freely to profess, practice and propagate religion. But, Nothing in this article shall affect the operation of any existing law or prevent the State ...


1

the only way they can go on the ride is by removing their religiously mandated headgear. Does the company have a duty to accommodate such guests by making a compromise of some sort? The company has a duty to look into what it can do, and if it can't do anything — articulate why. On the face of it, headsets are required "to fully experience the ride". That ...


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