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38

Speaking strictly from a legal standpoint, what can be said on the issue? Strictly speaking, the Constitutional Court is the top authority on the legality of anything. One can speculate as much as they want on whether the Court was biased, pre-determined, corrupt, defiant, flagrantly blatant or ridiculously unjust. These speculations would be pure politics. ...


13

I don't know what reports are claiming it's "probably unlawful/illegal" and why when the Russian constitution states: The Constitutional Assembly shall either confirm the invariability of the Constitution of the Russian Federation or draft a new Constitution of the Russian Federation, which shall be adopted by the Constitutional Assembly by two thirds ...


11

It is definitely illegal in Russia as well, but the police will do nothing. Previous activity of this group included forcefully attacking people who tried to speak to a girl who disliked it and handling over such people to police to get fined "for hooliganism". Usual practice in Russia is to beat the people whom the random girls around dislike. This group ...


4

There is no clear cross-jurisdictional answer to this question, and answering the question for Russia is extremely difficult for ordinary mortals (ask the Russian version of the ACLU, if there is such a thing). The rights section of the Russian Constitution enumerates rights to life, human dignity, freedom and personal immunity, inviolability of private ...


4

In the U.S.A. we have criminal and civil liabilities. If a person parked illegally and got violent with someone who told them they were parked illegally then they would possibly be liable criminally and civilly. It would depend on how far things escalated. The reason some law enforcement personnel get concerned over civilians confronting lawbreakers is that ...


4

Choice of Law The place where you get married is irrelevant to the question of whether or not you need a pre-nuptial agreement. What matters is where you intend to live once you get married. A pre-nuptial agreement exists to change the default rules of law upon death and divorce. These rules differ from state to state, so the default rules you might modify ...


3

Russian law in the 19th century was probably derivative of Roman law which is explained at page 594 of this 1903 law review article, because almost all countries in continental Europe at the time ultimately derived their substantive law from Roman law. There was a minor crime at Roman law for offensive statements, without regarding to the truth, and a tort ...


3

I have never heard of anything like this. I guess when you say "registered in that place" you are referring to Russian resident registration. The US doesn't have such a system, so this sort of certificate wouldn't even make sense.


3

Any legal question that begins with the word "suppose" becomes an academic exercise. Acceptance of religious principle can be incorporated in law, but it can also be reversed by later legislatures. In the case of witchcraft, I would recommend reading the results of a search on "Matthew Hopkins", "Pendle" and "Salem". ...


3

I don't know anything about Russian law, but from a U.S. perspective I'd say your analysis -- of both EULA interpretation and tiny-dick syndrome -- would be spot-on.


3

Could the US extradite the Russian Hackers who started the cyber attack against the US private sector and US government agencies and departments? No. The United States and Russia do not have an extradition treaty. See Russian Indictment and Extradition | American Constitution Society. And within Russia, extradition is constitutionally prohibited; see ...


2

Short answer, No. In the United State, all aircraft (even of other countries) may not have gambling devices onboard under title 49 SS 41311 An air carrier or foreign air carrier may not install, transport, or operate, or permit the use of, any gambling device onboard an aircraft In Russia, gambling was banned in almost every part of Russia in 2009 ...


2

The Russian Constitution Article 61(1) prohibits this, stating "The citizen of the Russian Federation may not be deported out of Russia or extradited to another state".


1

I interpret this as a general information question about website liability law in Russia, and not a request for specific legal advice. Many questions depend on detailed knowledge of how the Russian legal system works, good luck with that. Here is a summary of the 8 main categories of legal concern. You should not allow copyright infringement on your forum. ...


1

OP commissioned the work, so they own the copyright (Depending on the jurisdiction) OP has a verbal (possibly written if negotiated over email) contract with the artist. They made an offer ('can you make this for me'), with consideration ('I can pay you $xyz') and the other party, the artist, accepted the offer ('yup, I can do that for you') Presumably ...


1

It depends on where you are, among other things. In the US, if you commission an artist to make a work of art for money, as an "employee" the work is a "work for hire" unless your written contract says that it is not (thus not applicable in this case). The case of Community For Creative Non-Violence v. Reid, 490 U.S. 730 is the leading case for ...


1

It depends where this happened The basic rule of copyright is that the author/artist/creator owns the copyright. However, copyright law varies by country, for example: In the united-states the principal owns the copyright in work for hire which is: (1) a work prepared by an employee within the scope of his or her employment; or (2) a work specially ...


1

The effective law will depend on the jurisdiction where it is sought to publish such works. In the US works first published in the 1940s through the 1970s are protected for 95 years after publication, and so would still be protected. The US requirement for copyright renewal for works published prior to 1964 will not apply to works first published outside of ...


1

According to the Civil Code a.1281, exclusive rights on the work belong to its author until 70 years (or 74 years if the author worked during WW2 or participated in WW2) after the year of their death (or after the year of their postmortem rehabilitation if that happened). As for the personal use, article 1273 does allow that for posters. (And forbids ...


1

Not under U.S. law. I am not familiar with the election laws of Russia well enough to know.


1

They would first need to get a Declaration of Eligibility and Suitability which can be obtained from the Adoption Authority of Ireland.


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