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The President wouldn't be in breach of Insider Trading Laws (Section 10b of the Securities Exchange Act) since he has no information resulting from a position of trust within Twitter (or as a trusted provider of services) and no ability to depress their stocks through intentionally fraudulent practices. [O]ne who fails to disclose material information ...


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It's essentially a legally enshrined incentive for high net worth investors to supply capital, which is consistent with the other entities that qualify in § 230.501. It tends to come with increased access to riskier offerings, where the risk ensues from exempted registration. While nominal dollar thresholds typically get eroded away by inflation, they ...


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You might get away with it under federal law. But there are potentially also state laws to worry about. Under Texas law 17.461: "Pyramid promotional scheme" means a plan or operation by which a person gives consideration for the opportunity to receive compensation that is derived primarily from a person's introduction of other persons to participate in ...


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Are there such restriction for F-1 students who have been in the US for less than 5 years, who are non-resident aliens for tax purposes and are actually not citizens of the US but are citizens of another country? Short Answer For the most part, citizenship and immigration status are legally irrelevant to your eligibility to participate in an ICO (...


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The Distinction Is Probably Between Criminal And Civil Enforcement My suspicion is that the distinction that you are picking up upon reflects of division of labor in which civil enforcement actions are mostly handled by lawyers assigned to the Securities and Exchange Commission (an independent federal government agency), while criminal securities fraud ...


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There are several ways that a company can be subject to regulation by the Securities and Exchange Commission. The basic threshold is involvement in interstate commerce in the United States, which is a very low one and is probably satisfied simply by incorporating in the United States and having U.S. shareholders. In general there are also practical reasons ...


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In the US, "insider trading" includes both legal and illegal versions. When a corporate employee buys or sells shares of their company, they are insiders and they are trading (there is a requirement to report to the government). The illegal version involves breach of fiduciary duty or confidence. The relevant section of the federal regulations is 17 CFR 240....


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Paragraph (a) is also called a "paragraph." Unless a document establishes a specific naming convention, each level is typically referred to as a "paragraph." As to the SEC, the Commission tends to apply the "paragraph" convention. In the document you reference, this can be seen most concisely on page 508, where the language separately references "...


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Potentially applicable would be SEC rules 10b5-1 and 10b5-2, which would prevent certain individuals from buying or selling securities, if you have material private information (such as "I plan to give up on them, which will probably cause a dip in value"). These rules don't prohibit everyone from acting on the basis of what they know: there has to exist a ...


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It’s not insider trading Insider trading refers to leveraging private information that you only know because of your “insider” position. Front running is using information that is publicly available, albeit for a fee. Buying information that anyone can buy is not insider trading.


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This is not insider information. Inside information is information received from the Company or an employee or agent of the company that has not been publicly disclosed. So, it does not violate federal insider trading laws. It is conceivable that the search engine operator might have a contractual duty to to the company, for example, a non-disclosure ...


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In addition to "paragraph", the SEC (and many organizations, both governmental and not) also uses "subparagraph": see this SEC rule document filing from 2009 or s. 15E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.


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My experience has been that in the context of securities laws, the term general public includes but is not limited to business entities of all types. If you reason it through, you should agree that this must be the case. This is because, as a practical matter, there is no way to separate business entities from individuals when it comes to marketing and ...


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put in the vernacular, an "accredited investor" is a so-called "sophisticated" investor who does not need to be protected from their own stupidity or from rapacious consultants who prey on passive market participants (i.e. 401(k) fundies.) The number chosen IS essentially arbitrary. It's essentially 5x the median US income.


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If the company is a public US domiciled company the SEC regulates it. In addition, any foreign company that publicly traded its securities in the US is subject to SEC regulation.


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