10

Employees of an employer aren't governed by a fault based liability regime in the United States (subject to some usually quite narrow exceptions that vary from state to state, which sometimes also limit tort liability). Instead, employers are required to have worker's compensation insurance policies in place, in exchange for not having any tort liability ...


10

Generally speaking, if a person sends you an email you can publish it. Like if they call you a bunch of nasty names, or threaten you in some way, that information is yours and you can publish it. However, I'll give you three scenarios where you should not publish an email sent to you (and I'll edit to add more if they come up). Private facts. There is a ...


9

Probably not. Overview You haven't specified a jurisdiction. I will talk about Australia because that's what I'm familiar with. In Australia the most relevant area of law would be tort, specifically negligence. The university would be liable to pay damages if a court found that it owed a duty of care to your friend, that it breached that duty, and that ...


5

No, it may not be legal. Most original material is subject to the copyright laws. If one authors a poem, and sends it to a recipient by email, the poem is still copyrighted, and the author could still sue the recipient if the recipient uses the poem in ways which were not implicitly or explicitly authorised. There are various fair use exceptions to the ...


5

As the question mentions, and as the answer by leaustinwile explains in some detail, it is impossible to prove by cryptanalysis that a given decoding of a communication encrypted via a one-time-pad (OTP or pad) is correct. That does not mean that there is no way to prove such a decryption accurate to the satisfaction of a court of law. If the storage or ...


5

Well, in this case, it is interesting to note one fact about the one-time pad. The key and the ciphertext are interchangable and indistinguishable. So rather then thinking about it as encryption, it is better to think of it as spliting in two. If the prosecution finds both pieces and can tie them to you, then they have a good evidence against you. Both parts ...


4

The answer from @BlueDogRanch is right as far as it goes, but omits a critical point. There are certain acts that are excluded from liability under the Federal Tort Claims Act and granting a visa when it should have been denied is almost certainly one of them. The critical provisions are 28 USC § 2680(a) and (h). 28 USC § 2680. Exceptions to the Federal ...


3

It is generally legal for a business to ask, but it is not legal for a business to insist that you provide it as a condition of providing goods and services unless a law requires that the SIN be provided. As explained by the relevant Canadian government website: While there is no law barring businesses from asking for the SIN where there is no legal ...


3

Typically the victims of armed robberies file police reports, and the prosecutor brings charges on behalf of the State. In other words, individuals don't bring suits for armed robbery. What you might be referring to is that the University breached a tort duty to protect. There is some case law on the topic. For example, in Kline v. 1500 Mass. Ave. ...


3

In the United States: Government law enforcement agencies have no specific duty to provide security to an individual. This was established in Warren v. DC: The duty to provide public services is owed to the public at large, and, absent a special relationship between the police and an individual, no specific legal duty exists. Private security ...


3

The GDPR is wide in scope, and flexible in application. Therefore it is not possible to give an absolute yes/no as to whether masking text with asterisks is or is not lawful. We can gain a deeper insight by looking at the GDPR itself. Firstly, the definition of processing (Art. 4 lit. 2): any operation or set of operations which is performed on personal ...


2

When you give the owner of the establishment your money, you are executing some of your obligations pursuant to a contract you are creating that binds you and the business owner to certain terms - whether you are paying cover to get into a club, or paying for 100 cheeseburgers at McDonald's. Typically, you aren't going to get a written contract up-front ...


2

What is the minimum an online service or software vendor are required to do to protect personal data? In the UK that is covered by the Data Protection Act 1998. The full Act can be downloaded here (pdf) The Data Protection Act controls how your personal information is used by organisations, businesses or the government. Everyone responsible for ...


2

Your jurisdiction's laws and your concerns may vary slightly or significantly depending on where you are, so it would be wise to ask a local attorney. In the United States, most legal concerns would be addressed if a company doing that were to (1) check with an industry body about whether industry practice allows that, (2) include a note of explanation ...


2

In general, your computer security is not Amazon's problem, so they wouldn't have any obligation to tell you anything at all unless there is some law or contract specifying otherwise. Many US states do have security breach notification laws. You could try to figure out which state's laws apply here (possibly your state, or the state where Amazon is ...


2

No, it does not. There is indeed a 2-year guarantee for all goods, but "goods" is defined to be a "tangible movable item" according to Directive 1999/44/EC Article 1, subsection 2(b). In less legalese, a physical item; software doesn't count. While there has been discussion about extending this protection to software, I'm not aware of this having been done ...


2

The problem is going to be the "need to perform an exploit to find encryption keys." I'm sure you agreed to a software/hardware license with the purchase of the tags, and the license and/or TOS probably forbids reverse engineering or the use of an exploit to be able to do anything with the tags other than use them in the manner that Mifare clearly dictates, ...


2

Much of your ability to sue the email company for damages depends on local and Estonian laws, but the most important aspect is the TOS and user agreement you agreed to when you originally signed up for the service. Read it (though if the portal is now off-line, it may not be accessible). You may have agreed to hold the company not liable for any damages from ...


2

The US has extradition treaties with 110 countries, and lacks treaties with about 88 (depending on what you count as a country). We have no extradition treaties with the above mentioned countries, and generally speaking the US does not extradite except under terms of a treaty (see discussion here), following 18 USC 3184. There are provisions allowing ...


2

Legally, executives do not have a fiduciary duty to their company - they are employees and this does not create a fiduciary relationship. However, directors do have a fiduciary duty so I will assume that is what you mean. This duty is to the company - it is not to the shareholders individually or collectively. The market capitalisation of the company ...


2

Your question is based on a false premise Part 15 of the Telecommunications Act 1997 does not apply to Australian citizens - it applies to Designated Communications Providers as defined in s317C. There are 15 ways a person or corporation can be a Designated Communications Provider so I'm not going to list them. However, none of them have anything to do with ...


2

All this computer related stuff is really irrelevant. What is relevant is that he was supposed to fix a device of yours, and damaged it in the process. Usually you have the right to get your device back undamaged, and fixed, so it is most likely that the store is responsible for fixing your computer free of charge, this time properly. Anti-hacking laws ...


1

We need to make a distinction between criminal legal consequences and civil legal consequences. Criminal Extradition is only applicable to criminal matters and depends on the specific treaty between country A and country B. If they don't have one then there can be no extradition. Similarly there are clauses that are common enough that they can be ...


1

Are there any US precedents or laws governing reverse engineering of foreign company obtained code for security reviews? Yes there are, and they indicate that you may reverse engineer the executable. Regarding misappropriation of trade secrets, 18 USC § 1839(6)(B) explicitly states that "improper means" does not include reverse engineering, independent ...


1

There is no law in Hong Kong which specifically forbidden penetration testing software (as in forbidding firearms). However there are some related laws which you may want to be aware of: Chapter 106 Section 27A: Any person who, by telecommunications, knowingly causes a computer to perform any function to obtain unauthorized access to any program or ...


1

Private security have no special powers in the UK. They are just ordinary citizens like you are. Touching you is likely to assault at the very least. Asking you to hand over your phone, or open your shopping bags for inspection or anything like that is the same as if any other random person did it, i.e. they have no authority to force you to do so. All ...


1

"Public" DNS servers are public in the sense that they are available for the public to use by the adminstrator of each server. But each DNS server is run by either a government entity (or semi-government, such as a university or a government run corporation) or a private telecom company. And as such, each entity that runs a DNS server will have TOS (terms of ...


1

Under Art I Sect 4 of the Constitution, the President "shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for, and conviction of, Treason, Bribery, or other High Crimes and Misdemeanors". There is no existing crime or misdemeanor "Endangering the security of the state". However, in the case of Clinton's impeachment, the articles did not refer to a specific ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible