44

Just to expand on what others have answered: It's important that each crime is also given its own sentence as it's possible that prisoners can be cleared of crimes if new evidence is found. This could make a significant difference to the amount of time the prisoner is serving. For example if a person was convicted for kidnap, murder, and stealing a car, ...


26

In this case, it was a life sentence for the crime of rape and he got 30 life sentences because he committed 30 rapes, and is sentenced separately for each. Any time you see something talking about an absurdly long sentence, or about multiple life sentences, that's normally what happened. As a technical matter, many jurisdictions do not give convicted ...


19

Summary It tends to happen when someone is found guilty of multiple crimes. Sentences involving multiple convictions can be either concurrent or cumulative. Often, the law the defendant broke will specify whether the sentence should be concurrent or cumulative. Background As an example of the latter, if a defendant is convicted of four cumulative ...


11

Cohen plead guilty to a number of charges. If you plead guilty with any charges, then there is no need to go forward with a trial.


10

The president alone has power, under Article II, Section 2, Clause 1, to grant pardons for federal offenses. Many states have an analogous power for governors, to pardon state offenses. In some states, though (for example Minnesota), there is a board in charge of the process (made up, in Minnesota, of the Governor, Chief Justice and Attorney General). ...


9

The circuits all over the place on this one but I don't see these facts fitting according to the strictest rule. It is within the discretion of the police to decide whether delaying the arrest of the suspect will help ensnare co-conspirators, as exemplified by this case, will give the police greater understanding of the nature of the criminal ...


8

If you can be revived, you are not legally dead. To be declared dead you must be in cardio-pulmonary failure and have all attempts at resuscitation cease or be brain dead - no one has ever recovered from these conditions. Notwithstanding, if you are declared legally dead and show up alive, that declaration can be nullified i.e. you were never dead.


6

The short answer is that this is because the Florida legislature decided to do so. Why would they do that? Prosecutors are perceived to be more consistently in favor of "tough on crime policies" than judges, so allocating the authority to prosecutors makes it likely that waivers will be granted more sparingly. Prosecutors have the authority to plea bargain ...


6

This would be illegal in Australia (Criminal Code Act 1995 part 10.7: any unauthorised impairment of electronic communication to or from a computer), the US (Computer Fraud and Abuse Act) and any other jurisdiction that I can think of. There is no exception allowing vigilante action in case a person has a reasonable belief that the material on a website is ...


5

Medical life extension, ie treatments for common age-related causes of death, is increasing at a surprisingly fast pace, and life expectancy is only increasing. An 18 year old now might possibly live to be 125. The law doesn't, and shouldn't have to, take life expectancy into account when considering prison terms. Many sentences allow for consecutive or ...


4

I am not a lawyer either, though I have been through Pennsylvania a few times. The relevant law is 18 Pa.C.S. 5703, which prohibits recording without consent of all parties (Penna is a "two-party consent" state, like Florida and Washington). Unfortunately, violation of that law is a third degree felony, which has a maximum of 7 year prison. A specific ...


4

If someone was charged with 15 counts of a crime but was only indicted on 2 counts, can the prosecutor introduce evidence at sentencing of charges that the person was not indicted on? In federal court, yes. This has been the case since Williams v. New York, 337 U.S. 241 (1949) which held that evidence such as counts and conduct upon which the defendant ...


4

There was no actual child who was caused to view the material, so there was no offense under that provision. By contrast, inciting a child under 13 to engage in sexual activity is an inchoate offense, so it is not necessary for any harm to an actual victim to have occurred. Note that the relevant section of the Sexual Offenses Act 2003 concerns "causing or ...


3

In the first case, under US law, you are not considered guilty in most cases where you are forced to commit a crime under duress (gun to your head would certainly qualify). Murder is a rare exception to this rule, and the patron can be tried for the murder of the prostitute. Given the nature of Doe, who uses situations of duress to force a no win scenario ...


3

As you said, "serious" is a subjective description of a crime, but most lawyers would probably have the same first reaction when asked to make the distinction: Is it a felony or a misdemeanor? Felonies are objectively more serious because they come with longer sentences, as well as a variety of awful collateral consequences -- lost voting rights, ...


2

The main reason is that, if that criminal plead not guilty in the first trial, and the judgement entered against him, he can appeal conviction and sentence. If he plead guilty, he cannot appeal against conviction but can only appeal against sentence. Therefore, to ensure a chance of setting aside judgement, they will normally plead not guilty as advised by ...


2

The first step in the judicial process is arraignment. That's where the bail is set. You can plead guilty right there. Either you can get sentence then there or (for more serious crimes) there is a later hearing. It's extremely rare to plead guilty at an arraignment. At that point you don't even know the evidence against you. If someone represented by the ...


2

In the U.S. there are two categories of life imprisonment. Life imprisonment with possibility of parole (often after a certain number of years such as 25 or 40 years), and life imprisonment without possibility of parole (a.k.a. LWOP). If there is a possibility of parole, once you reach the eligibility point a parole board is allowed to release you subject ...


2

In England and Wales, "life imprisonment" usually does not mean "will die in jail". At the time a person is given a term of "life imprisonment" (most often for murder, where it is mandatory, but it can also be given for other crimes), the sentencing judge will also specify a "tariff". This is the minimum period they can spend in jail. After the tariff ...


2

There are several questions in U.S. law. Most likely none of them would provide a criminal defendant with a helpful remedy. 1. Was the attorney-client privilege actually breached? An attorney is authorized to disclose secrets in the furtherance of a representation, and it isn't clear if this did or did not further the representation. It isn't at all ...


2

Because Florida has felony murder laws. If you participate (including being an accessory) in the specified list of felonies (including armed robbery) and a murder is committed in the course of that felony, you are guilt of first degree murder. It is a prerequisite that she would also have been convicted for the robbery.


2

The maximum sentences available will depend on the specific crimes each was convicted of, noting that every jurisdiction defines crimes differently and has different maximum sentences for the same or similar crimes. The reason why the judge gave a particular sentence will be in the judgement - read them. If you still have questions post them. I note that ...


1

Here is one answer, comparing Jan Slomp with Ulbricht. Slomp took a plea deal, cooperated with the authorities, and helped to build the case against Ulbricht. His sentence reflected this. Meanwhile Ulbricht insisted on going to trial despite overwhelming evidence, challenged every aspect of the case against him, and tried to argue that he should be let off ...


1

This is the question of whether the sentences are to run consecutively or concurrently, and it's part of the sentencing decision. In many cases, the judge may have the discretion to make this decision based on the circumstances of the crime, the defendant's history, and so on. Some jurisdictions might have sentencing guidelines to help ensure consistency; ...


1

Ridiculously long prison sentences don't come about arbitrarily -- they come about because the defendant was convicted of a huge number of crimes, and each instance of the crime is punishable by time in prison. If you murder 10 people, and murder gets you at least 10 years, then you've earned 100 years. Frankly, there's no good reason to turn that into "...


1

Not a life sentence, but close enough to post it. After all, once you are dead you stop serving time; you no longer are a prisoner. Recently in Spain a prisoner was found in a deep coma (apparently he attempted to suicide) and was certified dead, only to be revived later (http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-42609239). And no, he was not freed because of ...


1

Alright after a lot of searching before hand I finally phrased the search right to find this.. Sorry to sound like I don't google things, but I'd been searching for a while. I do hope this helps others looking for this, as it is tricky to find. "A serious youth offender (SYO) sentence combines a sentence typically given to a juvenile with a sentence that is ...


1

contempt of court can hold an indefinite sentence until you abide by the court's wishes. There is currently (by currently I mean last time I looked up his status) a man in prison in Scotland for being naked and attending his court proceedings naked. He is known as the naked rambler as he likes to walk around the uk countryside naked. So what I would ...


1

some thinks, which crossed my mind: justice - if one kills like 5 people and is sentenced to life, than another, who killed brutally maybe 20 people should be senteced more. And if torture/execution is not possible, than to say "over this line you can do crimes without additional penalty, because it no longer matters what you do" simply does not feel right. ...


1

According to the Florida Statutes, section 810.02, this is probably a felony in the second degree, although there are circumstances you have not covered (using a vehicle to make entry, or causing sufficient damage, or assaulting an occupant of the structure, or during a state of emergency) that could make it a felony in the first degree. The relevant ...


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